April 12, 2021

In the News

  1. April 12, 2021
    • Photo of Paul Fleming

    “We need to envision alternatives that do not include firearms, surveillance and harassment, and take a more humane approach to public safety. We need to re-orient our public safety system away from punitive and violent policing and punishment systems and towards more supportive public health-focused social services,” said Paul Fleming, associate professor of health behavior and health education.

    Michigan Radio
  2. April 12, 2021
    • Photo of Aubree Gordon

    “I think a lot of people have worries about the safety of the vaccine for their children,” said Aubree Gordon, associate professor of epidemiology, stressing that any vaccine for kids will go through a rigorous vetting process: “You’re going to get immunity one way or another — either through vaccination or infection — and really to end this pandemic in a timely fashion … we really need a vaccine for children.”

    WXYZ
  3. April 12, 2021
    • Headshot of Jessica Finley

    Jessica Finlay, research fellow at the U-M Institute for Social Research, fears the pandemic will be the death knell for a large population of brick-and-mortar “third places” — locations where people gather that are not home or work: “I am worried that, long term, our neighborhoods and our communities will look completely different.” 

    Bloomberg
  4. April 9, 2021
    • Headshot of Afton Branche

    Many women workers who have lost their jobs may never return to the workforce. “We see two phenomenons at work,” said Afton Branche-Wilson, assistant director of community initiatives at U-M’s Poverty Solutions. “Women, and especially women of color, are more likely to work in industries that have been hit by the pandemic. … The second piece of this is women, particularly single mothers, have been forced to leave the workforce to take care of children not in school.”  

    Michigan Advance
  5. April 9, 2021
    • Photo of Daniel Crane

    “It’s like a dog chasing a car. What does the dog do when it catches the car? There aren’t natural seam-lines for breaking up Google; you’re not going to split it into an operating system and browser when the two were always integrated. So what’s your endgame?” said Daniel Crane, professor of law.

    Foreign Policy
  6. April 9, 2021
    • Headshot of Jessica Mellinger

    Alcohol-related liver disease is on the rise among young women amid increased pandemic drinking, says hepatologist Jessica Mellinger, assistant professor of internal medicine: “This is what we’re seeing a lot of in our young people and our young women. They have been, we think because of COVID and isolation and the myriad, diverse stressors that have happened as a consequence of lockdown, turning to alcohol.”

    ABC News
  7. April 9, 2021
    • Headshot of Rashmi Menon

    Rashmi Menon, entrepreneur in residence at the Ross School of Business, says while governments do, to an extent, encourage investing in contractors from underrepresented groups, more economic incentives could be put in place: “How do we change hearts and minds? Government programs are extrinsic motivations. I’d love to see more intrinsic motivations.”
    (The Record inadvertently ran a previously published In the News item featuring this faculty member in Thursday’s email. We are including the correct item today.)

    Crain's Detroit Business
  8. April 8, 2021
    • Brian Gilchrist

    “None of the students involved in this project had ever built a spacecraft before,” said Brian Gilchrist, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and climate and space sciences and engineering, whose class built a small satellite to test using the Earth’s magnetic field for propulsion — which would allow small satellites to orbit Earth without having to carry fuel, allowing them to stay aloft for longer periods of time.

    The Washington Post
  9. April 8, 2021
    • Headshot of Rashmi Menon

    Rashmi Menon, entrepreneur in residence at the Ross School of Business, says while governments do, to an extent, encourage investing in contractors from underrepresented groups, more economic incentives could be put in place: “How do we change hearts and minds? Government programs are extrinsic motivations. I’d love to see more intrinsic motivations.”

    Crain's Detroit Business
  10. April 8, 2021
    • Robert Sellers

    “We make it clear that this is a core value of the institution. If this isn’t something that’s important to (job candidates), then Michigan is probably not the place that you want to be,” said Robert Sellers, vice provost for equity, chief diversity officer and professor of education and psychology, on the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion at U-M.

    The Chronicle of Higher Education