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Dara Hill, associate professor of reading and language arts in the College of Education, Health, and Human Services at UM-Dearborn who made a documentary about her research

“I’m very appreciative that we have internal grants that allow folks to use their creativity and do research-based work that’s a little nontraditional.”

— Dara Hill, associate professor of reading and language arts in the College of Education, Health, and Human Services at UM-Dearborn who made a documentary about her research

Read more about Dara Hill

U-M Heritage

In the days following the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, U-M students — both male and female — had decisions to make regarding their response to the United States entering World War II. Their options were to serve in the armed forces or remain in school to continue their education before being called into service.

The campus at war

In the days following the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, U-M students — both male and female — had decisions to make regarding their response to the United States entering World War II. Their options were to serve in the armed forces or remain in school to continue their education before being called into service.

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Michigan in the news

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    • Headshot of Jennifer Read

    Low-income households in Detroit spend at least a quarter of their disposable incomes on water and sewer bills, putting the city’s poorest residents among the hardest hit by rising water costs in Michigan, according to research by Jennifer Read, director of the U-M Water Center, and colleagues. “If we continue on this trajectory, more people are going to have challenges affording their water and more communities are going to run into problems,” she said.

    The Detroit News
    • Photo by Marc Zimmerman

    Marc Zimmerman, professor of public health and director of the Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center, says the COVID-19 pandemic could be partially responsible for an uptick in school violence: “The pandemic has created isolation, has created stress in families and in kids, and it’s all just coming to a head when school reopened. … We’re talking about lots of violence more broadly, not just firearm violence, but lots of incidents of bullying and fighting.”  

    Michigan Radio
    • Photo of Tony Reames

    “We can transition away from our current energy system, make communities cleaner while improving health outcomes and building jobs,” said Tony Reames, assistant professor of environment and sustainability and senior adviser to the U.S. Department of Energy, whose research suggests that new zoning codes could “reduce future energy needs and related carbon emissions for the tens of millions of homes that will be built in the U.S. in coming decades.”

    Grist