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Kelly Miltimore

“I have this drive to fight for this population because I know how hard it was for us to get services when he was a cute kid.”

— Kelly Miltimore, a registered nurse who works in the Central Staffing Resources at Michigan Medicine and wrote a book about raising a special-needs child

Read more about Kelly Miltimore

U-M Heritage

Already flourishing with students, professors and facilities, U-M was also determined to be the state's agricultural school. It was a headiness that would fuel heated rhetoric and an animated rivalry that continues today between U-M and the school that prevailed as the agricultural school, Michigan State University.

Seeds of discontent

Already flourishing with students, professors and facilities, U-M was also determined to be the state’s agricultural school. It was a headiness that would fuel heated rhetoric and an animated rivalry that continues today between U-M and the school that prevailed as the agricultural school, Michigan State University.

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Michigan in the news

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    • Photo of Hitomi Tonomura

    “If he were a singer or artist, it would be fine, but people think he is not ‘lawyer-like’ nor looking appropriate for a person who will wed a royal woman,” said Hitomi Tonomura, professor of history and women’s and gender studies, commenting on the ponytail worn by the fiance of Japan’s royal princess when he arrived in Japan for their wedding this week.

    CNN
    • Photo of Vincent Hutchings

    Vincent Hutchings, professor of political science and Afroamerican and African studies, says Democrats’ attempts to get Republicans on board with voting rights legislation are counterproductive, and that eliminating or altering the filibuster may be the only way to pass federal legislation targeting voter suppression and gerrymandering.

    TIME
    • Photo of Daniel Fisher

    More than 11,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers in North America would bring down a mammoth the size of an African elephant and put the leftovers into ponds to keep it for later use. “The pond offers a place to stash carcass parts. What is the alternative when there are other predators and scavengers on the landscape who will gladly partake of a meal?” said Daniel Fisher, professor and curator of the U-M Museum of Paleontology.

    Live Science