September 30, 2020

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Coming Events

  • Sep 28

    Attend at Home — Week of Sept. 28

    Photo of Jen Shyu

    Each week, U-M’s Arts & Culture website highlights selected virtual events or exhibitions around the university.

    This week includes: U-M Library Open Access workshop; women’s suffrage lecture; Digital Artist Residencies; Race and Gender in Politics and Protest; Center for World Performance Studies series.

  • Oct 1

    Virtual Exhibition Tour with Heidi Kumao

    In conjunction with the exhibition “Real and Imagined: Fabric Works and Video Animations by Heidi Kumao,” 12:30-1:30 p.m.

  • Oct 2

    Ken Burns & Isabel Wilkerson: In Conversation

    Part of the Penny Stamps Speaker Series and the Democracy & Debate theme semester, 8-9:30 p.m.

More Events at Happening@Michigan

Faculty/Staff Spotlight

Ron Eglash, professor of information in the School of Information, and professor of art and design in the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design
“I was thrilled to be a part of this team. … Africa not only has an amazing art and humanities heritage, but also a mathematical heritage.”

— Ron Eglash, professor of information in the School of Information, and professor of art and design in the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design

Read more about Ron Eglash

This Week in U-M History

On Sept. 29, 1817, Native American tribes ceded land to the new "college at Detroit," or the University of Michigania, as part of the Treaty of Fort Meigs.

Land for ‘college at Detroit’

On Sept. 29, 1817, Native American tribes ceded land to the new “college at Detroit,” or the University of Michigania, as part of the Treaty of Fort Meigs. Read about some of the other things that happened in U-M history during the week of Sept. 28-Oct. 4.

Read more about U-M in History

Michigan in the news

    • Anne Ehlers

    “This operation is not a magic pill. It’s a tool to be used in combination with a proper diet and physical activity. Prior to surgery, patients should be taught how to eat, and after surgery they need to learn how much they can eat before feeling sick. Most people can tolerate any food in small amounts, but they may never be able to eat a full Thanksgiving dinner again,” said Anne Ehlers, assistant professor of surgery, noting that only one-half of 1 percent of people eligible for bariatric surgery currently undergo it.

    The New York Times
    • Lydia Kelow-Bennet

    While some may call summer 2020 a turning point for the country — with a raging pandemic and surging activism — Lydia Kelow-Bennett, assistant professor of Afroamerican and African studies, likens it to a broken leg that continues to heal improperly, and the only way to fully repair the limb is to break it again: “We keep trying to heal these breaks but they’re not set right in the first place, and so the reason then why these issues keep coming up, the reason why we have not addressed racial justice effectively in this country, is because we never set the break.” 

    NBC News
    • Headshot of Leah Litman

    “Although the election is not technically until November 3, election season is already well under way—most significantly in the dozens of election-litigation cases that are determining how people can vote, whether they can vote, and whether their votes will be counted. … While election law and voting rights might seem to have become nakedly partisan, only one side is actually favoring democracy,” wrote Leah Litman, assistant professor of law.

    The Atlantic