June 23, 2021

Today's Headlines

More Headlines

Coming Events

  • Jun 21

    Attend at Home — For the Week of June 21

    "Considering Matthew Shephard" performed by Conspirare | A Company of Voices, is one of the performances streaming this week as part of the new UMS Digital Pride.

    Each week, U-M’s Arts & Culture website highlights selected virtual events or exhibitions around the university. This week includes: “Considering Matthew Shephard” as part of the new UMS Digital Pride; Ann Arbor Summer Festival (A2SF) and The Ark Concert Series; Anti-Asian Hate & the Mental Health Crisis on College Campuses; Arts and the Public Good.

    The Record is suspending most daily Coming Events and its print-edition events calendar for the summer. All submitted campus events can be found at Happening @ Michigan.

More Events at Happening@Michigan

Spotlight

Darin Leese
“I like to pride myself as having the biggest collection of Ogunquit art in Michigan.”

— Darin Leese, a business systems analyst for My LINC through Information and Technology Services and an art collector

Read more about Darin Leese

This Week in U-M History

The Supreme Court of the United States upheld U-M's right to consider race in admissions decisions in a June 23, 2003, ruling. Read about some of the other things that happened in U-M history during the weeks of June 21-July 18.

High court’s decision

The Supreme Court of the United States upheld U-M’s right to consider race in admissions decisions in a June 23, 2003, ruling. Read about some of the other things that happened in U-M history during the weeks of June 21-July 18.

Read more about U-M in History

Michigan in the news

Some publications may require registration or a paid subscription for full access.

    • Photo of Earl Lewis

    “George Floyd’s death reminded us that our inability to control what happens means that we’re all vulnerable. … That’s the power and the future of American democracy — our ability to remind one another that we are connected and that democracy in all of its forms is pretty fragile,” said Earl Lewis, professor of history, Afroamerican and African studies, and public policy, and founding director of the Center for Social Solutions.

    The Associated Press
    • Jonathan Overpeck

    “The Southwest is getting hammered by climate change harder than almost any other part of the country, apart from perhaps coastal cities. And as bad as it might seem today, this is about as good as it’s going to get if we don’t get global warming under control,” said Jonathan Overpeck, dean of the School for Environment and Sustainability, commenting on a combination of the worst drought in two decades and a record-breaking heat wave in the American West.

    The New York Times
    • Photo of Jennifer-Erb Downward

    Research by Jennifer Erb-Downward, senior research associate at Poverty Solutions, found that homeless students face disciplinary action in Michigan public schools at a higher rate than their always-housed peers: “When you suspend or expel a child from school who’s homeless or housing unstable, you’re really removing from them the one location of consistency and stability that they have.” 

    Bridge Michigan
    • Robin Jacob
    • Elizabeth Koschmann

    More than half of Detroit public school students said they experienced symptoms of anxiety or depression and 23 percent considered attempting suicide before the pandemic. “Given the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on communities of color, the need for mental health support for Detroit students is even greater now,” said Robin Jacob, co-director of the U-M Youth Policy Lab. Elizabeth Koschmann, director of U-M’s TRAILS program, said leveraging school and community resources already in place may be an effective strategy.

    The Detroit News