September 25, 2021

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Spotlight

Ryan Ball
“Every student I met with the following day made it a point to say it went viral, and I didn’t even know what that meant.”

— Ryan Ball, clinical assistant professor of business administration in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business who used a potato filter in a recent study session and a student posted videos of it to TikTok

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U-M Heritage

Mary Henrietta Graham

Of splendid ability

When she stepped foot on the Michigan campus in September 1876, Mary Henrietta Graham became the first Black woman to attend the university. Her senior year, Professor Alexander Winchell published a book claiming Black people were inferior.

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Michigan in the news

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    • Headshot of Kristin Seefeldt

    Despite the pandemic’s economic hardships, the percentage of Michiganders living in poverty dropped from 11.7 percent in 2019 to 8.8 percent last year, thanks mostly to stimulus checks and expanded unemployment benefits, says Kristin Seefeldt, associate professor of social work and public policy: “The fact that we made these payments available really helped families out and probably kept things from being worse than they could have been.”

    Michigan Radio
    • Photo of Jeremy Kress

    “Wall Street banks should brace for a more aggressive supervisory and enforcement environment,” said Jeremy Kress, assistant professor of business law. “Banks have gotten the benefit of the doubt for the last four years. That’s probably over.” 

    Bloomberg
    • Photo of Jenny Radesky

    “When your overall business plan is really more about profits, and children are an afterthought, those are not the people that I want designing my next product that has lots of high-stakes risks about children’s development in terms of how they develop their sense of self, their social interactions, and their online presence and their privacy,” said Jenny Radesky, assistant professor of pediatrics, on Facebook’s plans to launch an Instagram for kids under 13. 

    The Hill