May 24, 2020

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Coming Events

  • May 18

    Attend at Home — Week of May 18

    Simon McBurney's "The Encounter" will be available for one week at ums.org. Photo by Joan Marcus.

    Each week, U-M’s Arts & Culture website highlights selected virtual events or exhibitions around the university.

    This week includes: “The Encounter,” Arts Engines with Aaron Dworkin, “Exposing the Past,” and “Museum at Home.”

    The Record is sharing Attend at Home while its print and online event listings are temporarily suspended. Read more

Check Happening@Michigan for events and cancellations

Faculty/Staff Spotlight

Nilay Chakraborty
“As an engineer, I have great respect for nature — there really is no better designer. Living things are extremely complex organic machines that got optimized in such a beautiful way over a long period of time.”

Nilay Chakraborty, associate professor of mechanical engineering at UM-Dearborn

Read more about Nilay Chakraborty

This Week in U-M History

On May 19, 1972, students dug bomb craters on campus to protest the Vietnam War. Read about some of the other things that happened in U-M history during the weeks of May 4-25.

Vietnam War protest

On May 19, 1972, students dug bomb craters on campus to protest the Vietnam War. Read about some of the other things that happened in U-M history during the weeks of May 4-25.

Read more about U-M in History

Michigan in the news

    • Headshot of Rashmi Menon

    “Downturns or challenging times are seen as good times to start a business for two reasons. One is, there is less competition for resources. The second reason is that whatever changes we face, positive or negative, bring up new customer needs. And customer needs are at the core of any business,” said Rashmi Menon, entrepreneur in residence at the Zell Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies.

    The New York Times
    • Allen Burton

    The flooding in Midland this week likely will pose a significant setback to the cleanup of a federal Superfund site caused by Dow Chemical’s release of dioxins in the last century, which contaminated areas along the Tittabawassee and Saginaw rivers, says Allen Burton, professor of environment and sustainability, and earth and environmental sciences: “They knew where all that stuff was, but the power of water is unbelievable and it’s going to move things around.”

    The Associated Press
    • Headshot of Emily Martin

    “A safe, effective vaccine is the only way to safely build herd immunity to this virus now. This is not just about getting through the current crisis. If this virus stays around, we need a vaccine to prevent resurgences in future generations,” said Emily Toth Martin, associate professor of epidemiology.

    Business Insider