February 20, 2020

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Faculty/Staff Spotlight

Samya Nasr, director of the Cystic Fibrosis Center and a professor of pediatrics
“Over time, we will have a global reach that will touch more lives than we will ever be able to count.”

Samya Nasr, director of the Cystic Fibrosis Center and a professor of pediatrics who is leading a team of volunteer staff and physicians dedicated to improving CF care around the world

Read more about Samya Nasr

This Week in U-M History

On Feb. 18, 1975, African-American students met with President Robben Fleming to demand increased black enrollment.

Taking a stand

On Feb. 18, 1975, African-American students met with President Robben Fleming to demand increased black enrollment. Read about some of the other things that happened in U-M history during the week of Feb. 17-23.

Read more about U-M in History

Michigan in the news

    • Headshot of Sarah Mills

    Farmers who own and farm land with turbines are more likely to have a succession plan in place on their property, said Sarah Mills, senior project manager at the Ford School’s Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy: “What they told me was that the guaranteed income that comes from hosting a turbine was convincing their kids that farming wasn’t such a risky business.”

    USA Today
    • Headshot of Josh Ackerman

    “It turns out that people are much more scared of things like shark attacks than vending machines despite the fact that people are more likely to die from a vending machine falling on them than a shark attack,” said Josh Ackerman, associate professor of psychology, explaining the fear surrounding the coronavirus.

    CNBC
    • Headshot of Ellen Brennan
    • Headshot of Omar Ahmed

    Ellen Brennan, doctoral student in neuroscience, and Omar Ahmed, assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience, have identified a previously unrecognized excitatory neuron in mouse brains that may aid scientists’ understanding of how the part of the brain responsible for navigation — the retrosplenial cortex — goes about navigating prolonged distances. “The retrosplenial cortex is critical for spatial orientation, but is one of the earliest brain regions to show dysfunctional activity in (people with Alzheimer’s),” Ahmed said.

    Medical News Today