In the News

  1. January 25, 2022
    • Image of Will Thomas

    “Were you sloppy, lazy or overoptimistic about your prospects? If you were, that may be bad business, but it doesn’t necessarily rise to fraud,” said Will Thomas, assistant professor of business law, commenting on a potential lawsuit alleging fraud against former President Trump for regularly fudging the value of assets on financial statements given to banks, insurers and tax authorities.

    The Associated Press
  2. January 25, 2022
    • Image of Emily Somers

    “That negative PCR from a specimen that was taken three days before travel may not be any better than a rapid on the day of travel,” said Emily Somers, professor of environmental health sciences and rheumatology, on the requirement by some countries that travelers show proof of a negative PCR test for COVID-19, rather than a rapid antigen test, before entering.

    CNN
  3. January 25, 2022
    • Picture of Sarah Elizabeth Patterson

    Seniors who need help with daily care and activities are more than twice as likely to get that help from their own biological children as opposed to stepchildren, according to Sarah Patterson, research investigator at the Institute for Social Research: “We know that older adults today are much more likely to be in stepfamilies than they were in previous generations.”

    NewsNation
  4. January 25, 2022
    • Image of Will Thomas

    “Were you sloppy, lazy or overoptimistic about your prospects? If you were, that may be bad business, but it doesn’t necessarily rise to fraud,” said Will Thomas, assistant professor of business law, commenting on a potential lawsuit against former President Trump alleging fraud for regularly fudging the value of assets on financial statements given to banks, insurers and tax authorities.

    The Associated Press
  5. January 25, 2022
    • Image of Emily Somers

    “That negative PCR from a specimen that was taken three days before travel may not be any better than a rapid on the day of travel,” said Emily Somers, professor of environmental health sciences and rheumatology, on the requirement by some countries that travelers show proof of a negative PCR test for COVID-19, rather than a rapid antigen test, before entering.

    CNN
  6. January 24, 2022
    • Photo of Ella Atkins

    Although wireless carriers will limit 5G service near airports, airlines are still pushing back, maintaining 5G could interfere with aviation equipment. Ella Atkins, professor of aerospace engineering, says airlines might sue if they think 5G causes flight disruptions: “Every time you cause a plane to not fly because of something like an interference problem or you cause it to divert to an alternate airport, that’s really expensive.”

    Marketplace
  7. January 24, 2022
    • Photo of Jonathan Levine

    “The safer states have implemented a bundle of policies that are oriented toward controlling the motor vehicle, while the dangerous states are more oriented toward accommodating it,” Jonathan Levine, professor of urban and regional planning. “The difference between the two suggests that policies that encourage driving make the transportation system more dangerous simply by exposing people to more travel.”

    Midland Daily News
  8. January 24, 2022
    • Headshot of Kao-Ping Chua
    • Headshot of Nora Becker

    Ivermectin prescriptions can cost private and Medicare insurance plans some $2.5 million a week, say Kao-Ping Chua, assistant professor of pediatrics and health management and policy, and Nora Becker, assistant professor of internal medicine. “The true amount of waste may be higher because we didn’t consider Medicaid spending. Also, by reducing barriers to an ineffective drug that some use as a substitute for COVID-19 vaccination, insurers may raise their spending on COVID-19 complications,” Chua said.

    Forbes
  9. January 21, 2022
    • Headshot of Howard Markel

    “Public health experts maintain that after the epidemiological curve plummets from hundreds (or more) cases and deaths per day per 100,000 people to fewer than five cases and deaths per day, for many successive days, officials will have a pretty good chance of declaring that COVID is no longer a pandemic. But as omicron continues to swell, we’re not even close to that,” wrote Howard Markel, professor and director of the Center for the History of Medicine.

    WIRED
  10. January 21, 2022
    • Photo of Aubree Gordon

    While experts predict the omicron wave will fall almost as quickly as it rose, just how fast cases fall will depend on how much a community abides by public health measures after that. “It depends on how high the peak is. And on whether or not when people see the case count numbers coming down, if they kind of loosen things up,” said Aubree Gordon, associate professor of epidemiology.

    CNBC