The National Center for Institutional Diversity at the University of Michigan will welcome three new NCID Postdoctoral Fellows in the 2020 academic year.

They come from across the country as early-career diversity scholars whose work advances the understanding of historical and contemporary social issues related to identity, difference, culture, representation, power, oppression and inequality.

This year’s fellows — Christina S. Morton, Sy Stokes and Cobretti D. Williams — bring academic backgrounds in higher education, as well as foundations that are as wide-ranging as engineering, African-American studies, and finance.

The NCID Postdoctoral Fellows’ scholarship aligns with NCID’s mission to produce, catalyze and elevate diversity research and scholarship, and to build intergenerational communities of scholars and leaders to integrate these evidence-based approaches to address contemporary issues.

“This program and the fellows it appoints are unique in its interdisciplinarity and the strong community of scholarly and professional support that it offers to outstanding scholars who are contributing to our knowledge on diversity and equity,” said NCID Director Tabbye Chavous.

Christina S. Morton

Christina S. Morton
Christina S. Morton

Morton’s work explores how cultural resources, such as spirituality, contribute to the success of students of color in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Her current project examines the role of spirituality in the lives of black women pursuing engineering doctorates. She plans to continue this line of research for black women in various STEM fields as they relate to persistence and success.

Morton earned her bachelor’s degree in industrial and operations engineering from U-M, her master’s degree in higher education from North Carolina State University, and her doctorate in higher education at U-M.

Sy Stokes

Sy Stokes
Sy Stokes

Stokes’ research focuses on the intersections of three key areas: exploring the relationship between presidential rhetoric and political decision-making on college students’ racialized experiences, developing and expanding critical theories of race to interrogate the systemic manifestations of white supremacy in education contexts, and examining the ways that college students respond to campus racism through activism and political engagement. His current primary research is focused on campus racial climates during the Trump presidency.

Stokes earned his bachelor’s degree in African-American studies from the University of California, Los Angeles, a master’s degree in higher education at the University of Pennsylvania, and Ph.D. in education from the University of Southern California.

Cobretti D. Williams

Cobretti D. Williams
Cobretti D. Williams

Williams’ scholarship critically analyzes policy, governance and practice within higher education institutions. He leverages the voices, experiences and historical perspectives of students, staff and faculty across the spectrum of race, gender and sexual identity. His research and practice center the experiences of underrepresented populations in higher education with a concerted focus on history, policy and governance.

Williams earned his bachelor’s degree in finance from Florida State University, his master’s degree in student development administration at Seattle University, and his Ph.D. in higher education at Loyola University Chicago.

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