University of Michigan
News for faculty, staff and retirees

December 10, 2018

In The News

December 10, 2018

Andrew Hoffman, professor of management and organizations, and of environment and sustainability, discussed the risk climate change poses to the economy, and how that risk might help convince people skeptical about climate change to change their mind: “A lot can happen between now and 2100.”

Michigan Radio

December 10, 2018

James Hathaway, professor of law and director of the Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, said the United Nations’ Global Compact for Migration is not only nonbinding but is also not a treaty: “No government has to do anything here other than show up for meetings.”

The Globe and Mail (Canada)

December 10, 2018

“Since 2016, there has been an increase again in the demand for light duty trucks, which, combined with lower oil prices, created more supply in the SUV market. We need to do much more to electrify those vehicles if we are to meet targets,” said Greg Keoleian, professor of environment and sustainability and director of the Center for Sustainable Systems.

Wired

December 7, 2018

“Racism has not ended in Cuba, and many feel it has increased with the rise of private enterprise … But one of the revolution’s lasting achievements is to have instilled a strong national pride in Cuba’s African heritage, giving black Cubans a voice that continues to push for greater equality and the right to black self-expression,” wrote Ruth Behar, professor of anthropology.

The New York Times

December 7, 2018

“I think it remains to be seen what the truth is regarding coordination with WikiLeaks. But if the truth could be found, I think Robert Mueller will find it, and President Trump could find himself in trouble, either related to the alleged collusion or obstruction to impede the investigation,” said Barbara McQuade, professor from practice at the Law School, on the alleged link between Trump adviser Roger Stone and WikiLeaks.

The Guardian (U.K.)

December 7, 2018

Kevin Stange, associate professor of public policy, and colleagues found that colleges and universities spend more money on providing courses in pre-professional programs and high-paying academic fields in science and engineering than on courses in the humanities and social sciences: “This variation in costs is a function of large differences in class size and, to a lesser extent, differences in average faculty pay.”

Inside Higher Ed

December 6, 2018

“Since the 1960s, the noise level in hospitals has gone up,” said Mojtaba Navvab, associate professor of architecture, who helped design acoustical changes to the university’s hospital corridors by adding acoustic tiles to hallway walls.

The New York Times

December 6, 2018

Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy, said it remains to be seen how well China’s promised crackdown on fentanyl will be implemented: “(Overdoses) are still increasing and show few signs of falling down, so whatever we can do on that front to really stem the supply, almost all of which is from illicit manufacturing, should be helpful and impactful.”

TIME

December 6, 2018

“Are Trump’s tweets admissible evidence of witness tampering? Yes. Period. Would they be enough to convict a president who lies and cheats in plain view every week of the year, about matters small and huge, and gets away with it? Who knows?” said Samuel Gross, professor emeritus of law.

Vox

December 5, 2018

“We’re going a little bit more in the crazy direction, off into the unknown,” said Louise Willingale, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science, referring to experiments using U-M’s HERCULES, the world’s most intense laser, which can produce conditions like what one would see flaring off sources like pulsars, the rapidly spinning corpses of dead stars.

National Geographic

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