University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

October 19, 2018

In The News

October 19, 2018

“With high-resolution cameras and all the other remote-sensing instruments at different wavelengths, it’s quite possible we’re going to find very new features that we have not thought about possibly existing on Europa,” said Xianzhe Jia, associate professor of climate and space sciences and engineering, who has found evidence of vapor plumes on Jupiter’s moon Europa.

The Atlantic

October 19, 2018

Molly Welch-Marahar, policy fellowship program manager for the Center for Healthcare Research & Transformation, says proposed regulations could jeopardize an invaluable component to the substance abuse treatment network — recovering addicts helping those in treatment: “There’s more and more support for the mode of peer support being critical in engaging people in recovering and ensuring long-term stability.”

Bridge Magazine

October 19, 2018

Matt Bernhard, doctoral student in computer science and engineering, has shown in videos how he can defeat plastic security ties that counties across Michigan use to protect ballot bags, the cases that store voting machines and the ports that store the memory cards on optical-scan machines, which record paper ballots scanned into them.

Motherboard

October 18, 2018

“They’re just computers at the end of the day. Often with voting machines, when you open it up, it’s not that different from a desktop PC or mobile device. The only difference is that it’s going to be 10 years out of date, or sometimes 20 years,” said J. Alex Halderman, professor of electrical engineering and computer science.

ABC News

October 18, 2018

Research led by Devin Gill, stakeholder engagement specialist at the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, found that harmful algal blooms have changed the way many Lake Erie recreational anglers and charter captains fish: “For some of them, it looks unnatural. It looks like the lake is sick.”

Great Lakes Echo

October 18, 2018

“If you were here in 1817, Michigan would have seemed an entirely indigenous space. It was dominated by native peoples. … There’s still (a) significant native population in the state of Michigan. There are 14 reservations, 14 communities,” said Michael Witgen, associate professor of history and American culture, and director of Native American studies.

Michigan Radio

October 17, 2018

“Most poor people are white. Putting a thumb on the scale for low-income students will help far more white students than black or Hispanic students,” said Susan Dynarski, professor of public policy, education and economics, raising doubts that pursuing socioeconomic diversity in admissions practices will help racially diversify a campus.

The Atlantic

October 17, 2018

“The abundance of programming and commercial viability of smaller audiences is making it possible for storytelling from a much wider range of experiences to finally be available,” said Amanda Lotz, professor of communication studies, on the plethora of streaming video services and niche programming.

Wired

October 17, 2018

David Moran, clinical professor of law, says a 2006 Supreme Court case he argued, but lost, permits police who violate the knock-and-announce rule to use incriminating evidence they find: “We couldn’t find a single case in which a jury had returned anything other than nominal damages for a violation of the knock-and-announce rule. … There’s really been no deterrent, no incentive to prevent the police from kicking down doors, even when it’s illegal.”

The Washington Post

October 16, 2018

“Partisanship is now a very important part of the average citizens’ compass for determining how they feel about not just issues but about each other,” said Nicholas Valentino, professor of political science and research professor at ISR’s Center for Political Studies.

The New York Times

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