University of Michigan
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June 17, 2019

In The News

June 12, 2019

Justin Kasper, associate professor of climate and space sciences and engineering, and colleagues believe they know why the sun’s outer atmosphere is hotter than its surface, and hope to prove it with help from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe: “Whatever the physics is behind this superheating, it’s a puzzle that has been staring us in the eye for 500 years.”

Newsweek

June 12, 2019

“They’re extraordinarily radical. Even the most conservative ones would have seemed almost inconceivable, I would say, as short as five years ago,” said Reuven Avi-Yonah, professor of law, commenting on G20 proposals that would upend a global tax system that lets many of the world’s corporate giants get away with paying little to no tax.

Quartz India

June 12, 2019

Research by Aubree Gordon, assistant professor of epidemiology, and colleagues found for the first time that targeting a specific portion of the flu virus that varies relatively little from strain to strain offers protection in humans — moving the search for a universal flu vaccine one step closer to fruition.

Scientific American

June 12, 2019

Vincent Hutchings, professor of political science and Afroamerican and African studies, says automatic and same-day registration increase registered voters but they do not address racial discrepancies in voter turnout, and even if all 50 states adopted these policies to encourage participation, “we have to encourage more equity in a whole range of other dimensions.”

HuffPost

June 12, 2019

H. Luke Shaefer, director of Poverty Solutions and associate professor of social work and public policy, said Congress should keep the earned-income tax credit as a work inducement for poor Americans and include a separate plan to help those who have fallen out of the labor market: “The work incentive is good, but we should layer something on top of that so we’re not leaving out the poorest families.”

The Washington Post

June 5, 2019

“The supply of well-prepared teachers is probably the most crucial issue facing the entire state. It’s already a challenge in our more challenged districts. But it will become an even greater challenge across the state as teachers retire,” said Elizabeth Birr Moje, professor and dean of the School of Education.

The Detroit News

June 5, 2019

“I have been so thrilled seeing these operas coming out now, writing blackness into history in this unlikely place: on the opera stage,” said Naomi André, associate professor of Afroamerican and African studies, women’s studies and the Residential College, on the “The Central Park Five” opera and other new works that explore the Black Lives Matter era, identity and more issues long ignored by the art form.

The New York Times

June 5, 2019

“This has been part of the sensationalist rhetoric of anti-abortion activists for a long time. What is striking about this is that this is now in an opinion by a Supreme Court justice,” said Alexandra Minna Stern, professor of American culture, history, women’s studies, and obstetrics and gynecology, on remarks made by Justice Clarence Thomas that linked abortion rights to the eugenics movement of the early 20th century.

The Washington Post

June 5, 2019

A column on the inclusivity of Asian “spaces” online and in the media features comments by Melissa Borja, assistant professor of American culture, and Lisa Nakamura, director of the Digital Studies Institute and professor of American culture, women’s studies, English language and literature, and film, television and media. “How we define ‘Asian American’ and how we imagine the category, and belonging to this category, continues to be powerfully shaped by East Asian Americans,” Borja said.

Bustle

June 5, 2019

“I am very concerned that parents and educators may be wasting money and time using ineffective learning tools. ... The prevalence of the learning style myth and commercial products means that it is very easy to spend money and time on programs or strategies that may not be helping children learn,” said Shaylene Nancekivell, visiting scholar in psychology.

Newsweek

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