UM-Dearborn team helping modernize DoD engineering ecosystem

Topics:

The U.S. Department of Defense is in the midst of a big modernization push and is enlisting an interdisciplinary faculty team from UM-Dearborn to reimagine how it designs, tests and manufactures new systems.

Led by Pravansu Mohanty, professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering and Computer Science, the 18-month, $3.5 million project will focus on helping the Defense Department adopt the iterative design-build strategies and secure cloud technologies that have become the gold standard in modern manufacturing.

Photo of Pravansu Mohanty, professor of mechanical engineering at UM-Dearborn
Pravansu Mohanty, professor of mechanical engineering at UM-Dearborn, is leading the team working with the Defense Department. (Photo by Emily Barret-Adkins)

“The key challenge is that a lot of things at the DoD still happen in silos,” Mohanty said. “But in today’s manufacturing environment, you want the design teams, and the testing and validation people and the people working in the field to be communicating with each other and sharing information so they can make continuous improvements.”

At the heart of the UM-Dearborn team’s reimagined Defense Department engineering ecosystem is an integrated approach to design, testing and manufacturing.

The process of creating something often is viewed as progressing sequentially from an initial concept stage to a final building stage. But, Mohanty said, in a modern manufacturing environment, information is continuously flowing in many directions.

For example, after an initial design for a physical component is created, that design can be subjected, through simulation, to various technical and material analyses. If any issues are discovered, the design team can make improvements before moving on to the next stage.

Similarly, manufacturing processes, like 3D printing, can use sensors and machine-learning algorithms, giving testing and validation teams opportunities to identify issues long before parts are ever tested in the field.

Mohanty said manufacturing strategies like this yield time and cost savings, as well as higher quality products.

Security is the other major focus for the UM-Dearborn team.

Anytime information is allowed to flow more freely among people, especially if that involves cloud-based sharing and outside contractors, there are potential security risks. For the Defense Department, these are also national security risks. To protect against cybersecurity threats, Mohanty’s team and collaborators are building the information-sharing ecosystems around secure cloud technologies.

Photo of Chris Pannier (left), assistant professor of mechanical engineering, and graduate student Maximilian Ullrich
The interdisciplinary team from UM-Dearborn includes Chris Pannier (left), assistant professor of mechanical engineering, and graduate student Maximilian Ullrich.
(Photo by Emily Barrett-Adkins)

In a design challenge model that will be familiar to many engineering students, the initiative will be centered around a surrogate project: creating an optionally manned fighting vehicle.

The UM-Dearborn team won’t actually be creating anything quite so flashy, but Mohanty said it will work with real designs and manufacturing, and will test actual components to ensure the team’s design-build system can stand up to the rigors of the real world.

In addition to Mohanty, UM-Dearborn faculty involved in the project include:

  • Chris Pannier, assistant professor of mechanical engineering.
  • Georges Ayoub, associate professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering.
  • Zhen Hu, associate professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering.
  • Abdallah Chehade, associate professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering.
  • Xuan (Joe) Zhou, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering.
  • Lei Chen, assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

Additional industry and academic partners include the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technologies, the University of Maryland and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences.

Tags:

Leave a comment

Please read our comment guidelines.