The Board of Regents approved the following items at its May 21 meeting:

2022-23 academic calendar continues pre-Labor Day start

The 2022-23 academic calendar for the U-M Ann Arbor campus will follow the model used for the 2020-21 and 2021-22 calendars, including a pre-Labor Day start date of Aug. 29. The pre-Labor Day start allows for a one-week break between the end of the summer term and the start of the fall term. The fall term includes a fall break, Oct. 17-18, and no classes Nov. 23, the day before Thanksgiving. Classes will end Dec. 9 with exams concluding Dec. 19, providing two full weeks between the fall and winter semesters. The fall and winter terms have 69 days each and have no conflicts with religious holidays. The academic calendar was vetted by faculty and administrative groups, following the university’s well-established academic calendar guidelines.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

**Jiande Chen, professor of internal medicine, effective April 1, 2020.

Angela D. Dillard, professor of history, LSA effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Margaret Foster, associate professor of classical studies, LSA, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

David M. Fresco, professor of psychiatry, Medical School, effective June 1, 2020.

Alla Karnovsky, associate professor of computational medicine and bioinformatics, Medical School, effective June 1, 2020.

Aaron A. King, professor of complex systems, LSA, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

**Dawn O. Kleindorfer, professor of neurology, effective May 1, 2020, and Robert W. Brear Professor of Neurology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Jamaal Sharif Matthews, associate professor of education, School of Education, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Jonathan L. Ready, professor of classical studies, LSA, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

David Zerkel, professor of music, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Named professorships

*Sami J. Barmada, Angela Dobson Welch and Lyndon Welch Research Professor, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*David A. Bloom, Jack Lapides Professor of Urology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Thomas J. Giordano, Henry Clay Bryant Professor of Pathology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*James C. Hathaway, James E. and Sarah A. Degan Professor of Law, Law School, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Catherine E. H. Keegan, Charles E. Lytle, Jr. Research Professor of Pediatrics, Medical School, effective May 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Janet L. Larson, Shaké Ketefian Collegiate Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Jack M. Parent, William J. Herdman Professor of Neurology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Yehoash Raphael, R. Jamison and Betty J. Williams Professor of Otolaryngology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*R. Kevin Reynolds, George W. Morley Collegiate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Caroline R. Richardson, Dr. Max and Buena Lichter Research Professor of Family Medicine, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Leslie S. Satin, Joanne I. Moore Research Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Patrick D. Schloss, Frederick G. Novy Collegiate Professor of Microbiome Research, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Dorceta E. Taylor, James E. Crowfoot Collegiate Professor of Environmental Justice, School for Environment and Sustainability, effective June 1, 2020, through May 31, 2025.

*B. Gregory Thompson, Jr., John E. McGillicuddy Collegiate Professor of Neurosurgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Peter Todd, Bucky and Patti Harris Career Development Professor of Neurology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Administrative appointments

*Edwin A. Bergin, chair, Department of Astronomy, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2024.

*Anthony M. Bloch, chair, Department of Mathematics, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Amy K. Dittmar, senior vice provost for academic and budgetary affairs, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective Aug. 1, 2020, through July 31, 2025.

Carlos González-Cabezas, associate dean for academic affairs, School of Dentistry, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Jacqueline S. Jeruss, associate dean for regulatory affairs, Medical School, effective May 1, 2020.

*Robert T. Kennedy, chair, Department of Chemistry, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

**Dawn O. Kleindorfer, chair, Department of Neurology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2020.

*David A. Lam, director, Institute for Social Research, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Priscilla Lindsay, chair, Department of Theatre and Drama, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

Elizaveta Levina, chair, Department of Statistics, LSA effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Christian Matijas-Mecca, chair, Department of Dance, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Karin A. Martin, chair, Department of Sociology, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Patricia A. Reuter-Lorenz, chair, Department of Psychology, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Yeidy M. Rivero, chair, Department of Film, Television, and Media, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Arthur M. Verhoogt, associate dean for academic programs and initiatives, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Elizabeth Yakel, senior associate dean for academic affairs, School of Information, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Other transactions

Gary B. Huffnagle, transfer of tenure to professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology, with tenure, LSA; professor of internal medicine, without tenure, and professor of microbiology and immunology, without tenure, Medical School, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Hwaji Shin, Toyota Visiting Professor of Japanese Studies, LSA, effective Aug. 31, 2020, through March 31, 2021.

Geoffrey Thün, change in title to senior associate dean for research and creative practice, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, effective June 1, 2020, through May, 31 2023.

Dearborn campus

Jorge González del Pozo, chair, Department of Literature, Philosophy and the Arts, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Georgina S. Hickey, chair, Department of Social Sciences, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Ghassan T. Kridli, associate dean for undergraduate education, College of Engineering and Computer Science, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2022. Also interim dean, College of Engineering and Computer Science, effective Sept. 1, 2020. (reappointment is for associate dean for undergraduate education)

Ann Yolonda Lampkin-Williams, correction to effective dates of appointment as dean, College of Education, Health, and Human Services, effective July 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

*Maria Gabriella Scarlatta, associate dean, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Mitchel A. Sollenberger, associate provost for undergraduate education and student success, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective July 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

Karen S. Strandholm, interim chair, Department of Management Studies, College of Business, effective April 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

Flint campus

Marilyn R. McFarland, David M. French Professor, effective July 1, 2020.

Jeannette Stein, acting associate dean, College of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Sapna V. Thwaite, associate dean, School of Education and Human Services, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Annie N. Whitlock, chair, Department of Education, School of Education and Human Services, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Matthew F. Wyneken, acting associate dean, School of Education and Human Services, effective July 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

*Reappointments
**Interim approval granted
***Reappointment and interim approval granted

Retirements

Kevork B. Bardakjian, Marie Manoogian Professor of Armenian languages and literatures and professor of Armenian languages and literatures, Department of Middle East Studies, and professor of Slavic languages and literatures, LSA, May 31, 2020. Bardakjian received his Master of Arts degree from the State University of Yerevan in 1969 and his Ph.D. from the University of Oxford in 1979. He joined U-M in 1987 as an associate professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. He went on to join the then-Department of Near Eastern Studies in 1997 and was promoted to professor in 2001. Bardakjian directed the Armenian Studies Program from 1995-2007. He was a true universalist in Armenian studies, philologist, literary scholar and historian who published groundbreaking work on modern Armenian literature, the Armenian church under the Ottomans, Hitler and the Armenians, the Mekhitarist fathers and the Armenian apocalyptic tradition. Bardakjian was a pivotal figure in his field in Armenia, Turkey and elsewhere, and he was respected in diaspora communities around the world. His work was supported by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and he was recognized with two honorary doctorates. Bardakjian was elected a fellow of the Armenian National Academy of Sciences in 2011. 

Tomasz K. Baumiller, professor of earth and environmental sciences and curator, Museum of Paleontology, LSA, May 31, 2020. Baumiller received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Chicago in 1979, his Master of Science degree from the University of Illinois in 1984, and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1990. He joined U-M as an assistant professor and assistant curator in 1996. He was promoted to associate professor and associate curator in 1999, and to professor and curator in 2005. Baumiller’s research involved three broad areas of paleobiology: the documentation and interpretation of biotic interactions, such as predation and parasitism, and their role in evolution; the reconstruction of the function and ecology of extinct organisms; and the quality of the fossil record — how to use constructively the biological information lost during fossilization. His approach involved combining experimental studies of living organisms with data gathered from fossils. His work on modern invertebrate faunas included some 20 submersible expeditions to deep marine environments of the Caribbean, as well as scuba-based studies of the shallow reefs of Palau, Australia, and Jamaica. Baumiller’s scholarly efforts resulted in more than 100 publications. He held visiting positions at the University of Tübingen from May-August 1992 and the National Museum of Natural History in Paris from April-July 2002. He was a recipient of Fulbright Research Awards for Poland in 2002-03, New Zealand in 2010, and Austria in 2016-17. Baumiller was elected a fellow of the Paleontological Society in 2014.

Elizabeth J. Brough, clinical assistant professor of nursing, School of Nursing, May 31, 2020. Brough received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in 1975 from The Ohio State University, her Master of Science in Nursing degree in 1991 from Case Western Reserve University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2009. Brough was a clinical instructor in the University of Detroit Mercy’s McAuley School of Nursing in 2009 and joined U-M as a clinical instructor that same year. In 2019, she was promoted to clinical assistant professor. In the School of Nursing, Brough served as the cluster lead from 2012-14 and as assistant director for educational excellence and coordination of the undergraduate program from 2016-20. She had a variety of professional, clinical, administrative and teaching roles over the course of her 30-year nursing career. Her teaching included clinical instruction of Michigan Medicine’s undergraduate adult acute care courses. Brough used innovative approaches to engage students in learning, including the use of simulation, audience response systems, point of care electronic and computer devices, and case-based education using actual scenarios and virtual communities. As a scholar, Brough’s expertise included developing knowledge of the role that positive emotions play in health and illness. She focused on understanding the role of emotions in chronic illness, specifically in women with hypertension.

Richard K. J. Brown, clinical professor of radiology, Medical School, May 31, 2020. Brown received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1976 and his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1980 from the University of Michigan. He completed his diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine training at the University of California, Los Angeles. Following a successful career in private practice from 1986-2004, Brown joined U-M as a clinical associate professor in 2004. He was promoted to clinical professor in 2010. He served as the director of clinical nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the Division of Nuclear Medicine from 2004-20. Brown made significant contributions to the field of radiology and to Michigan Medicine. He was nationally recognized for his work in both imaging and quality initiatives. He served as the co-chair of the American College of Radiology’s Committee on Practice Parameters & Standards-Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging. Brown authored 80 peer-reviewed publications and served as the editor of the Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging section of RadioGraphics. He also served on the Medical Advisory Board of Covera Health. At U-M, Brown was on several committees, including the Advisory Committee on Clinical Track Appointments, the Radioactive Drug Research Committee and the Subcommittee on the Human Use of Radioisotopes. He was an innovator in education and the founding chair of the Radiology Innovations Collaborative Committee. In collaboration with the team at the Duderstadt Emerging Technology Group, he co-developed a virtual reality tool to identify MRI patients at risk of claustrophobia. He received three Department of Radiology’s Excellence in Teaching Awards in 2012, 2013 and 2015, and the U-M Health System’s Outstanding Clinician Award in 2014.  

Sergey M. Chernyak, associate research scientist, environment health sciences, School of Public Health, April 20, 2020. Chernyak received his Master of Science degree in 1971 from Moscow State University and his Ph.D. in 1979 from the State Oceanographic Institute, Moscow – Hydrochemical Institution. He joined U-M as an associate research scientist in 2003. Chernyak was an international authority in environmental chemistry with 50 years of research experience in laboratory methods for the analysis of several thousand organic compounds in both biological and non-biological samples that bridge environmental, environmental health and occupational health areas. He served as analytical chemist and scientist for the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Ministry of Geology and Environment Protection of the U.S.S.R. and Russian Federation. He was a member of several editorial boards, including the U.S. Department of the Interior, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Russian Meteorological Committee. At U-M, much of Chernyak’s work focused on persistent compounds, including chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls and other halogenated (i.e. brominated) hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, furanes and other compounds. He was one of the first investigators to test a large group of organic contaminants in the remote coral ecosystems of the South Pacific and first to conduct a large-scale survey of these pollutants in plankton and bottom-dwelling organisms from the Arctic and Antarctic Seas.

Paul N. Courant, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Edward M. Gramlich Distinguished University Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Harold T. Shapiro Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, and professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy; professor of economics, LSA; professor of information, School of Information; and faculty associate, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research within the Institute for Social Research, May 31, 2020. Courant received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968 from Swarthmore College, and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1973 and 1974, respectively. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1973. He was promoted to associate professor in 1978 and to professor in 1984. Courant served as director of the Institute for Public Policy Studies (now the Ford School) from 1983-87 and 1989-90, and as chair of the Department of Economics from 1995-97. He made major contributions to U-M and higher education nationally, holding several key administrative positions, including associate provost for academic and budgetary affairs from 1997-2001; provost and executive vice president for academic affairs from 2002-05, and as interim provost in 2017; and university librarian and dean of libraries from 2007-13. Courant guided the design and implementation of U-M’s budget model, the development of the digital library, the creation of HathiTrust and the approval of the Go Blue Guarantee. He authored six books and more than 70 papers on topics including tax policy, local economic development, gender differences in pay, housing, radon and public health, and university budgeting systems.

Ernest N. Emenyonu, professor of Africana studies, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2020.Emenyonu received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1966 from the University of Nigeria, his Master of Arts degree in 1967 from Columbia University, and his Ph.D. in 1972 from the University of Wisconsin. He joined UM-Flint as a professor and chair of the Department of Africana Studies in 2002. Emenyonu published extensively in the field of African Literature, including nine books. Appointed editor of African Literature Today in 2000, Emenyonu has edited 14 volumes since 2002. His reputation as a prolific author, inspiring teacher and visionary administrator is well known in colleges and universities in Nigeria and the United States. He has led study abroad trips to Africa and Jamaica. Over the past 18 years, he designed and taught several courses in African and African American literature, as well as a seminal general education course titled, “Sites and Sounds of Africa.” As chair of the department from 2002-08 and 2014-17, Emenyonu introduced and organized the renowned “African Writers Visit Series,” which brought world-class writers to Flint to interact with faculty, students, staff and community members. He was a fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Letters, the Nigerian Academy of Education and the Literary Society of Nigeria.

William Fulton, Oscar Zariski Distinguished University Professor of Mathematics and professor of mathematics, LSA, May 31, 2020. Fulton received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1961 from Brown University and his Ph.D. in 1966 from Princeton University. He joined U-M as the M.S. Keeler II Professor of Mathematics and professor of mathematics in 1998 following a distinguished career at Brown University from 1970-87 and the University of Chicago from 1987-98. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1997 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1998. In 2000, Fulton was named a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Much of Fulton’s research was in the field of algebraic geometry and neighboring areas, and he was considered one of the top leaders in the field at the international level. He made major contributions to many of the most important areas of algebraic geometry, including intersection theory, toric varieties, Schubert calculus and quantum cohomology. Through his research, writing and teaching, Fulton helped shape the landscape of contemporary algebraic geometry. He authored or co-authored 10 books and 59 other publications. His most famous book, “Intersection Theory” (1984), was awarded the 1996 Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition by the American Mathematical Society. In 2010, Fulton received the Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement from the American Mathematical Society. He helped develop U-M’s Department of Mathematics into a leading center of algebraic geometry.

Marva J. Furman, professor of English, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2020. Furman received her Bachelor of Arts degree from the Tuskegee Institute in 1970, her Master of Arts degree from Bucknell University in 1972, and her Ph.D. from Florida State University in 1979. From 1972-76, she was an instructor at Florida A&M University. After serving as an adjunct professor, she joined the UM-Flint faculty as assistant professor in 1988. She was promoted to associate professor in 1996 and to professor in 2004. For 40 years, Furman was a popular, influential instructor for a wide array of courses for undergraduate and graduate students. Her courses ranged from introductory courses in humanism, the environment and literary analysis to upper-level and graduate classes on early and modern American literature. She served on myriad department, college and university committees. She also directed the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program from 2007-20. Aside from her work as a teacher and an administrator, Furman was a steady researcher and writer. She authored several academic articles and four books. Furman received the Alvin D. Loving Junior Faculty Initiative Award in 1994 and the Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Senior Faculty Award in 2006. 

Elaine K. Gazda, professor of classical art and archaeology and curator, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, LSA, May 31, 2020. Gazda received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1964 from Marietta College, her Master of Arts degree in 1966 from the University of Pennsylvania, and her Ph.D. in 1971 from Harvard University. She served as an assistant professor of fine arts at the University of Southern California from 1971-74. Gazda joined U-M as an assistant professor and assistant curator in 1974. She was promoted to associate professor and associate curator in 1978 and to professor and curator in 1988. Gazda held a number of key administrative roles, including director of the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology from 1979-80, 1999-2000 and 2006-09; associate director of the Kelsey Museum from 1981-86; director of the Kelsey Museum from 1986-97; and director of the U-M Program in Florence in 1998. A pre-eminent figure in the field of Roman art, Gazda curated more than 30 exhibitions and co-authored and edited some 19 books and exhibition catalogues, as well as numerous articles and papers, making particular interventions in the study of Roman painting and Roman sculpture. Her collaborative work challenging the 19th century narrative of Roman works as mere “copies” of Greek ideal sculpture revolutionized the field. She received the Charles Eliot Norton Lectureship of the Archaeological Institute of America in 2004-05, election to corresponding membership in the German Archaeological Institute from 2009-present, the John H. D’Arms Faculty Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentoring in the Humanities in 2010 and the American Academy in Rome Trustees’ Medal in 2011.

Bonnie M. Hagerty, associate professor of nursing, School of Nursing, April 30, 2020. Hagerty received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1974 from Russell Sage College, her Master of Science degree in 1977 from the University of Maryland, and her Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Michigan. Hagerty joined U-M as a lecturer in 1987. She was promoted to assistant professor in 1990 and to associate professor in 1997. She served as interim director of the Division of Acute, Chronic, and Long-Term Care from 2006-07. She was also the director of undergraduate studies from 2007-08, assistant dean for undergraduate studies from 2008-11, and associate dean for undergraduate studies beginning in 2011. Hagerty made considerable contributions to the teaching, research and service missions of the School of Nursing. She developed a theory of human relatedness with a focus on the sense of belonging and designed an instrument to measure this concept known as the Sense of Belonging Instrument. This instrument was published, translated into several languages and used worldwide for research relating to belonging, depression, suicide, identity and other indicators of social and psychological functioning. Hagerty also conducted research on depression with a specific focus on depression in the military, adherence to antidepressant medications, self-management of recurrent depression and the relationship between depression and sense of belonging.

John W. Hoard, associate research scientist, mechanical engineering, College of Engineering, Feb. 29, 2020. Hoard received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1970. He worked for Ford Motor Co. as a principal engineer and technical leader from 1970-2007 before joining U-M as an associate research scientist in the Walter E. Lay Automotive Engineering Laboratory in 2007. Hoard’s expertise focused on exhaust emissions, including aftertreatment; deposits and exhaust gas recirculation cooler fouling, models and testing; engine combustion, efficiency and emissions; and alternate fuels and energy policy. Hoard received various awards throughout his career, including being named a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers and an associate of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Internal Combustion Engine Division. He received U-M’s Kenneth M. Reese Outstanding Research Scientist Award for 2017-18, as well as the SAE’s Forest R. McFarland Award as a key contributor to the SAE’s Fuels and Lubricants Section in both 2004 and 2019. He holds 22 patents and was published 115 times.

Janean E. Holden, Barbara A. Therrien Collegiate Professor of Nursing and professor of nursing, School of Nursing, May 31, 2020. Holden received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from the University of Utah in 1974 and her secondary education teacher’s certificate from Weber State College in 1982. She received her Master of Science degree and her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1987 and 1993, respectively. She held a postdoctoral fellowship in pharmacology at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1993-96. Holden joined U-M as an associate professor in 2009 and was promoted to professor in 2012. She served as the School of Nursing’s associate dean for research from 2014-18. Holden made considerable contributions to the teaching, research and service missions of the School of Nursing. Her teaching expertise focused on the areas of pathophysiology and pharmacology. Holden’s preclinical research was built on identifying the mechanisms underlying pain modulation in the spinal cord that alter pain perception in the brain. Holden was funded consistently for most of her career, including three R01 grants from the National Institutes of Health. She received international recognition for her work and was inducted into the American Academy of Nursing in 2009. 

L. Rowell Huesmann, Amos N. Tversky Collegiate Professor of Communication Studies and Psychology, professor of communication and media, and professor of psychology, LSA; and research professor in the Research Center for Group Dynamics within the Institute for Social Research, May 31, 2020. Huesmann received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1964 from the University of Michigan, his Master of Science degree in 1967 from Carnegie Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. in 1969 from Carnegie Mellon University. He was a lecturer from 1968-69, an assistant professor from 1969-73, and an associate professor in 1973 at Yale University. He went on to be an associate professor from 1973-79 and a professor from 1979-1992 before serving as department chair from 1987-90 at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Huesmann joined U-M as a professor in 1992. He was a pre-eminent scholar in the psychological foundations of aggressive behavior and, in particular, understanding how observations of others behaving violently influences the development of a youth’s aggressive and violent behavior and produces a contagion of violence. Huesmannauthored more than 100 widely cited scientific articles and was the editor of the international journal Aggressive Behavior. He was the 2005 recipient of the American Psychological Association’s award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Media Psychology and the 2014 recipient of the International Society for Research on Aggression’s J. Paul Scott Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Aggression Research. Huesmann was a member of the USA National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention from 2010-15. He was also a past president of the International Society for Research on Aggression and a life member of Clare Hall College, Cambridge University. He served as director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics from 2006-12 and as acting chair of the Department of Communication Studies from 1993-94.

James S. Jackson, Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, professor of psychology, and faculty affiliate in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, LSA; and research professor, Research Center for Group Dynamics in the Institute for Social Research, May 31, 2020. Jackson received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1966 from Michigan State University, his Master of Arts degree in 1970 from the University of Toledo, and his Ph.D. in 1972 from Wayne State University. Jackson joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1971. He was promoted to associate professor in 1977 and to professor in 1986. Jackson’s research contributions include founding and directing for more than 40 years the Program for Research on Black Americans, which has become the flagship for research devoted to understanding racial and ethnic influences on physical and mental health of black populations. Jackson was also involved in influential research on aging in underrepresented populations and creative research within the biopsychosocial model. His research program led to more than 17 books and more than 180 research articles. He received the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Award for the Applications of Psychology in 2019 and the Distinguished Service to Psychological Science Award in 2016. Jackson is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine; the National Science Board; and a fellow in several other academic societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Margaret F. Kahn, David M. French Professor and professor of political science, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2020. Kahn received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Oberlin College. She earned her Master of Arts degree and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1976 and 1984, respectively. She joined UM-Flint as an assistant professor in 1984, and was promoted to associate professor in 1989 and to professor in 1998. Kahn’s scholarly research explored the union movement, pay equity and labor and employment, and inequalities in public policy. Kahn taught courses in comparative politics, comparative social welfare and health policy, and gender and employment. She served as chair of the Department of Political Science and on the Executive Committee and Curriculum Committee of the College of Arts and Sciences. She received the U-M Academic Women’s Caucus Sarah Goddard Power Award in 2000, UM-Flint’s Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Senior Faculty Award in 2000, and the Dorothea Wyatt Award in 1991 and 2015. She helped establish the women’s and gender studies minor and the Women’s Educational Center, and in 2010 co-founded the UM-Flint Common Read program. Kahn also participated in advocacy work with national women’s policy networks, U-M’s Center for the Education of Women, the Center for Civil Justice and other Flint and Michigan non-profit organizations. She was a member of the American Sociological Association’s Committee for the Distinguished Career Award for the Practice of Sociology.

Jamile Trueba Lawand, associate professor of foreign languages, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2020.Lawand received her Licenciado degree (Master of Arts equivalent) from the University of Seville in 1985 and her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1992. She joined UM-Flint as an assistant professor in 1995 and was promoted to associate professor in 2000. Lawand had instructional responsibility in several programs: Spanish Language and Literature, Middle Eastern Studies, University Honors Scholar Program and the First Year Experience (General Education Program). She also taught courses in Hispanic culture and 20th-century French literature in translation. She was a member of the Honors Council from 2017-20, an honors representative from 2012-20, a member of the Academic Affairs Advisory Committee from 2008-11, director of the Middle Eastern Studies Program from 2007-20, coordinator of the Comparative and General Literature Program from 2006-20, chair of the Faculty Council from 2005-06, head of the Spanish Section from 2001-05 and 2017-20, member of the CAS Executive Committee from 2001-04 and chair of the Department of Foreign Languages from 2005-08 and 2011-17 (acting chair from fall-summer 2000). In her research, Lawand published a book and articles in a number of refereed journals. She published two refereed articles on Spanish Renaissance rhetoric at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

Vahid Lotfi, professor of management science, UM-Flint School of Management, May 31, 2020. Lotfi received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1976, his Master of Science degree in 1980 and Ph.D. in 1981 from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He served as a visiting assistant professor of industrial engineering from 1981-82 and an assistant professor of management science and systems from 1982-90 at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined UM-Flint as an associate professor in 1990 and was promoted to professor in 1995.

Lotfi held a number of leadership positions at UM-Flint, including interim director of the Flint Information Technology Services from 1996-99, executive director of Flint Information Technology Services from 1999-2001, associate provost and dean of graduate programs from 2001-11 and senior vice provost and dean of graduate programs from 2011-17. He also served as interim provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs from 2007-08 and 2009-10, and as acting dean of the School of Management from 2010-13. As acting dean, he was instrumental in relocating the School of Management to its current home at the Riverfront Building. As vice provost, he founded online learning on the Flint campus, expanded the use of technology and increased collaboration with local K-12 schools. As dean of graduate programs, he increased graduate program offerings. Lotfi’s research focused on multiple criteria decision making and predictive modeling with application in health care services. He authored and co-authored more than 40 scholarly publications and published three books.  

Carl F. Marrs, associate professor of epidemiology, School of Public Health, May 31, 2020. Marrs received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1975 from the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in 1982 from the University of Wisconsin. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1985 and was promoted to associate professor in 1992. Marrs’ primary research efforts have been on the genetics, pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. His research also included more general studies on antibiotic resistance, dental biofilms, oral microbiota and type 4 pili. He co-authored more than 140 research articles. He served U-M for 28 years as chair of admissions for the Department of Epidemiology, and for 28 years as a member, chair, or associate chair of U-M’s Institutional Biosafety Committee. He was also a member of U-M’s Biologics Oversight Task Force. Marrs was a founding member of the Public Health Genetics Interdepartmental Concentration Program in the School of Public Health. He was heavily involved in the development of a multi-school undergraduate microbiology major, and later in the creation of the School of Public Health’s undergraduate degree programs.  

Marianne P. McGrath, professor of psychology, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2020. McGrath received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1980 from the University of Illinois, and her Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Houston in 1984 and 1987, respectively. She joined UM-Flint as an assistant professor in 1991. She was promoted to associate professor in 1996 and to professor in 2012. McGrath, who served as chair of the Department of Psychology from 2013-16, explored a variety of concepts related to developmental psychology and gender differences. Most recently, she assessed gender differences and adult appearance accuracy. Her earlier publications focused on developmental differences in empathy and prosocial behaviors, as well as child abuse. She received the Argus Award for Outstanding Effort in Working to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect in Genesee County in 1996. McGrath took on a variety of leadership roles, including serving as chair of the Institutional Review Board for 13 years. Her work led to improved objectivity and just oversight in providing protection for human participants across disciplines.   

Hugh L. Montgomery, professor of mathematics, LSA, May 31, 2020. Montgomery received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Illinois in 1966. He received a Marshall Scholarship to study at the University of Cambridge in 1966, where he was elected a fellow of Trinity College in 1969 and earned his Ph.D. in pure mathematics in 1972. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1972. He was promoted to associate professor in 1973 and to professor in 1975. Montgomery’s research was in number theory and harmonic analysis. He specialized in analytic number theory, with an emphasis on the distribution of prime numbers, the properties of the Riemann zeta function and the distribution of its zeros. Montgomery has 98 scholarly publications, and authored or coauthored five books. He also co-authored “An Introduction to the Theory of Numbers”(5th edition), which has become a standard introductory text. In the Department of Mathematics, Montgomery mentored several young mathematicians and served in the areas of academic advising, undergraduate scholarships, awards and organizing undergraduate competitions and mathematical problem solving activities. He received a research fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 1974-75 and 1976-77, the Prix Salem from the French Mathematical Society in 1974 and the Henry Russel Award from U-M in 1975. 

Margaret Murray-Wright, clinical assistant professor of nursing, UM-Flint School of Nursing, May 31, 2020. Murray-Wright received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in 1973 from the University of Pittsburgh, and her Master of Science in Nursing degree in 1977 from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Licensed as a professional registered nurse in Michigan, she joined UM-Flint as a lecturer in 2005 and was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 2007. From 2012-16, she was associate director for all undergraduate Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs. Murray-Wright’s contributions include the development, implementation and evaluation of curricula that led to a successful onsite accreditation review of all B.S.N. programs by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education in 2015. She also played an integral role in the nursing leadership team that ultimately garnered the support of the executive officers of the university in creating a School of Nursing as the fifth academic unit on the UM-Flint campus in 2016. Prior to her arrival at UM-Flint, Murray-Wright served as the vice president for patient care services at Memorial Healthcare in Owosso, Michigan. Murray-Wright is a scholar in genetics, genomics and pathophysiology. She actively engaged students in service to medically underserved domestic communities. In addition, she mentored students during international service-learning trips to Cambodia in 2009 and 2017, and to Bolivia in 2014. 

Kirk Philipich, associate professor of accounting and finance, UM-Dearborn College of Business, Dec. 31, 2019. Philipich received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree in 1977 from Saint Louis University, and his Master of Business Administration and Doctor of Business Administration degree from Indiana University in 1981 and 1984, respectively. Philipich served on the faculties of the University of Notre Dame, Saint Louis University and The Ohio State University. He joined UM-Dearborn as an assistant professor in 2005 and was promoted to associate professor in 2011. Philipich published articles in a number of journals, including the Journal of Accounting Research, Financial Analysts Journal, Financial Management, Accounting Horizons, Advances in Accounting, CPA Journal, Journal of Business Cases and Applications and Oil, Gas & Energy Quarterly. He taught a wide variety of courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In the College of Business, he served as chair of the Curriculum Committee from 2010-11, as a member of the Executive Committee from 2010-11 and as chair of the Graduate Curriculum Committee from 2012-13.  

Becky J. Rodda, clinical professor of physical therapy, UM-Flint College of Health Sciences, July 31, 2020. Rodda received her Bachelor of Science degree in natural sciences in 1977 from Northern Michigan University, her Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy in 1980 from Texas Women’s University, her Master of Health Science degree in 1993 from Washington University in St. Louis, and her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in 2006 from Drexel University. Rodda has been a certified physical therapist in Michigan since 1981. She has been certified from the American Physical Therapy Association as a clinical specialist, a credentialed clinical instructor and an advanced credentialed clinical instructor since 1995, 1996 and 2009, respectively. Rodda has also been certified in orthopedic manual physical therapy since 1995. She joined UM-Flint as a lecturer in 1996. She was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 1999, to clinical associate professor in 2008 and to clinical professor in 2016. Rodda’s research focused on the clinical application of strength and mobility tests applied within the athletic and neurologic patient populations. Rodda served on several unit and universitywide committees, including the Chancellor’s Fee Policy Committee, the Student Concerns Committee, the Thompson Center Teaching and Learning Advisory Board, the Library Committee, the Curriculum Development Committee, the Accreditation Task Force and the Alumni/Development and Scholarship/Awards/Grants Committee.

Carl P. Simon, professor of mathematics and professor of complex systems, LSA; professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, May 31, 2020. Simon received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1966 from the University of Chicago and his Master of Science degree and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1967 and 1970, respectively. He joined U-M an assistant professor in 1972. He was promoted to associate professor in 1978 and to professor in 1988. From 1999-2009, Simon was the founding director of the Center for the Study of Complex Systems. He was the director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program in the Ford School from 2011-16. Simon’s research centered on the theory and application of dynamical systems. He published research in many fields, including the theory of chaotic dynamical systems, economic mechanisms for price adjustment, optimal presidential term length, evolution of ecological systems and of literary genres, sex-differences in smoking initiation, a systems approach to the spread of crime, and the spread of communicable diseases such as HIV, influenza, malaria and gonorrhea. He and his research group were among the first to estimate the contagiousness of HIV. Their work was recognized with the 1995 Howard M. Temin Award in Epidemiology for Scientific Excellence in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS and the 2005 Kenneth Rothman Epidemiology Prize. He co-authored the popular textbook “Mathematics for Economists.” He was named the LSA Distinguished Senior Lecturer for 2007 and received the U-M Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award in 2012.

John R. Stembridge, professor of mathematics, LSA, May 31, 2020. Stembridge received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1981 from the California Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in 1985 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, receiving a Sloan Pre-doctoral Fellowship his final year. He served as an E.R. Hedrick Assistant Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, from 1985-88. Stembridge joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1988. He was promoted to associate professor in 1990 and to professor in 1995. Recognized as a leader in the field of algebraic combinatorics, he had a special interest in representation theory, Coxeter groups, root systems, symmetric functions and enumeration. In 2007, he was a member of an international team of 18 mathematicians and computer scientists who successfully mapped the Lie group E8, one of the largest and most complicated structures in mathematics. Within the Department of Mathematics, Stembridge was active in mentoring young mathematicians and served many years on the Doctoral Committee, including a term as doctoral chair. He was associate chair for regular faculty from 2015-17 and a long-serving member of the Computer Committee. He held editorial board positions on numerous mathematics journals and published more than 66 research papers. Stembridge was also the author of several Maple software packages for the study of symmetric functions, partially ordered sets, root systems and finite Coxeter groups.

Edward L. Stuenkel, professor of molecular and integrative physiology, Medical School, April 30, 2020. Stuenkel received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1976 from South Dakota State University, his Master of Science degree in 1978 from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and his Ph.D. in 1983 from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He completed postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Michigan. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1990. He was promoted to associate professor in 1996 and to professor in 2002. From 2012-18, Stuenkel served as the director of the interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program. He also participated in founding the College of Health and Life Sciences at Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Qatar, serving temporarily as the founding dean. At U-M, he served on the Biomedical Research Council of the Medical School, the Associate Chairs for Research Committee, the Barbour Fellows Committee and the Taubman Institute Neuroscience White Paper Committee. He also served on several committees in the Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, including the Graduate Committee and the Internal Review Committee, and served as director of Global Graduate Education initiatives. Stuenkel also served on the national Academic Health System Partnership Working Group Committee and as chair of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee at Qatar Foundation. He served on the editorial board of the Biophysical Journal and as a chair of the Exocytosis and Endocytosis Subgroup of the Biophysical Society. He received the Outstanding Faculty Service Award from the U-M Neuroscience Graduate Program in 2011 and was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2015.

Linda Bjork Terrell, clinical assistant professor of internal medicine, Medical School, June 1, 2020. Terrell received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Michigan in 1980 and her Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine in 1987. She completed her postgraduate training in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1990. She joined the Harvard Medical School in Boston as an instructor in medicine and concurrently worked as an emergency medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital from 1990-93. She joined U-M as a clinical instructor in 1993 and was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 1997. For the past five years, Terrell served as the medical director of the Briarwood Medical Group. In 2014, she was elected to the Academiae Laureati Medici (Clinical Excellence Society) and served as the elected officer for three years. She received the Gradwohl Art of Primary Care Award in 2017 and the Steven E. Gradwohl Excellence in Continuity General Medicine Teaching Award from U-M internal medicine residents in 2019. Terrell also served on multiple committees and was an active member of the Clinical Care Review Committee. Over the past year, she was a co-investigator in the Michigan Predictive Analytics and Clinical Trajectories Study sponsored by Apple Inc.

Charles B. Thomas Jr., associate professor of sociology, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2020. Thomas received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1970 from Cornell University, and his Master of Arts degree and his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1973 and 1976, respectively. He worked at several universities as a postdoctoral fellow, research scientist, visiting professor and assistant professor. He joined UM-Flint as an assistant professor in 1987 and was promoted to associate professor in 1998. Thomas served as chair from 1998-2001 and interim chair in 2015 of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice. Thomas’ research on the study of human values led to scholarly publications and conference presentations that examine the ways values shape patterned interactions among groups of people in different settings. He served as a core faculty member in the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and supported the Department of Africana Studies with his teaching service. Thomas received the Campus Compact for Michigan’s Faculty/Staff Service Learning Award in 2004, UM-Flint’s Distinguished Service Award in 2006, and UM-Flint’s Olivia P. Maynard and Olaf Karlstrom Award for Civic Engagement in 2009.

Maureen P. Tippen, clinical associate professor of nursing, UM-Flint School of Nursing, May 31, 2020. Tippen received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in 1978 from Northern Michigan University, and her Master of Science degree in 1986 from Pace University. Licensed as a professional registered nurse in Michigan, Tippen was certified by the American Nurses Association in perinatal nursing and as a hospice trainer. She joined UM-Flint as an adjunct lecturer in 1994. She was promoted to lecturer in 1995, to clinical assistant professor in 1999 and to clinical associate professor in 2017. Her international service spanned 25 years with service-learning trips to Cambodia, India, Kenya, Peru and the Dominican Republic. In honor of her international service and her clinical practice of pediatrics, she received a number of awards, including the Cambodian Parliament Service Award from the Kingdom of Cambodia in 2016 and the Clinical Service Award from the Antonio Musa Hospital in San Pedro, Dominican Republic, in 2010.  

Christine M. Waters, professor of art, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2020. Waters received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1972, her Master of Arts degree in 1975 and her Master of Fine Arts degree in 1977 from the University of Wisconsin. She joined UM-Flint as a visiting professor in 1987. She was appointed assistant professor in 1988 and was promoted to associate professor in 1994 and to professor in 2009. A distinguished painter, Waters’ work was regularly exhibited at regional and national venues. Several of the large oil paintings from her series on the city of Flint grace the halls of the university. Waters was a founding faculty member of the art program at UM-Flint. Under her leadership, the program grew from a few courses to a thriving department that offers four distinct degrees and several minors. During its development, the art program was housed in the music/art department, the communication and visual arts department, and most recently the art and art history department; Waters served as chair of all three departments. In addition to many terms as chair, she served the university in administrative roles, including associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, acting dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, associate provost and dean of graduate studies, and associate provost and dean of undergraduate studies. Waters also served on many committees, as chair of the Faculty Council, and as a member of several search committees. 

Christina B. Whitman, Francis A. Allen Collegiate Professor of Law and professor of law, Law School; and professor of women’s studies, LSA, May 31, 2020. Whitman received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968, her Master of Arts degree in 1970 and her Juris Doctor degree in 1974 from the University of Michigan. She clerked with Judge Harold Leventhal on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. on the Supreme Court of the United States. She joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1976. She was promoted to associate professor in 1979 and to professor in 1982. Whitman wrote broadly in the areas of constitutional law, federal courts and constitutional litigation, with a special focus on the field of constitutional torts, evaluating the success of and values underlying legal liabilities of governmental officers acting within the scope of their official responsibility. Whitman served as U-M’s vice provost for academic and faculty affairs, special counsel to the provost for the policy on conflicts of interest and conflicts of commitment, the Law School’s associate dean for academic affairs, and as chair of Law School Admissions Council Board of Trustees. Whitman has twice won the Law School’s prestigious L. Hart Wright Award for Excellence in Teaching, most recently in 2014.

J. Frank Yates, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and professor of psychology, LSA; and professor of business administration in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business, May 31, 2020. Yates received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1967 from the University of Notre Dame and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1969 and 1971, respectively. Yates joined U-M as a lecturer in 1969. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1971, to associate professor in 1977 and to professor in 1986. He held additional appointments in the Ross School. Yates was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2017 and received the James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award from the Association for Psychological Science in 2011. Yates’ service advanced intellectual excellence and equality across diverse ethnic and social groups. As a graduate student in 1970, he wrote proposals for a service to improve black students’ academic success (now the Comprehensive Studies Program) and for a black studies center, which evolved into the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies. In 2005, he founded and directed the Preparation Initiative in the Ross School, a learning community for diverse groups of first-year undergraduates.

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