The Board of Regents approved the following items at its June 25 meeting:

UM-Dearborn 2022-23 academic calendar approved

The Board of Regents approved UM-Dearborn’s academic calendar for the 2022-23 school year. The calendar calls for 70 class days during the fall term and 69 class days during the winter term. Fall 2022 classes will begin Aug. 29, winter 2023 classes begin Jan. 9, and classes for the 2023 summer sessions begin May 3. Winter Commencement is Dec. 17 and Spring Commencement is April 30. The calendar meets the established campus criteria for developing the academic calendar.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

Peter J.H. Scott, associate professor of radiology, Medical School, effective June 1, 2020.

Celeste Watkins-Hayes, professor of sociology, LSA; and professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Basit Zafar, professor of economics, LSA, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Named professorships

*James R. Baker, Jr., Ruth Dow Doan Professor of Biologic Nanotechnology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2021.

*Terrill D. Bravender, David S. Rosen, M.D. Collegiate Professor of Adolescent Medicine, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*James E. Carpenter, Harold W. and Helen L. Gehring Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2021.

*Eric R. Fearon, Emanuel N. Maisel Professor of Oncology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Kirk A. Frey, David E. Kuhl Collegiate Professor of Radiology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Jeffrey W. Innis, Morton S. and Henrietta K. Sellner Professor of Human Genetics, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Lori L. Isom, Maurice H. Seevers Collegiate Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Karl J. Jepsen, Henry Ruppenthal Family Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Timothy M. Johnson, Lewis and Lillian Becker Professor of Dermatology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Marc L. Kessler, Allen S. Lichter, M.D. Professor of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*William S. Lovejoy, Raymond T.J. Perring Family Professor of Business Administration, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective June 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

*Ormond A. MacDougald, John A. Faulkner Collegiate Professor of Physiology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Harry L.T. Mobley, Frederick G. Novy Collegiate Professor of Microbiology, Medical School, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Sara K. Pasquali, Janette Ferrantino Professor of Pediatrics, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Steven W. Pipe, Laurence A. Boxer, M.D. Research Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Linda C. Samuelson, John A. Williams Collegiate Professor of Gastrointestinal Physiology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Rebecca J. Scott, Richard Hudson Research Professor of History, LSA, effective Aug. 31, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

*Catherine Shakespeare, Arthur Andersen Professor of Accounting, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

*John R. Traynor, Edward F. Domino Research Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*James O. Woolliscroft, Lyle C. Roll Professor of Medicine, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Gregory A. Yanik, Leland and Elaine Blatt Family Professor of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Gowoon Yu, Arthur Andersen Professor of Accounting, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

Administrative appointments

Angela J. Beck, associate dean for student engagement and practice, School of Public Health, effective June 1, 2020, through May 31, 2023.

*Norman D. Bishara, associate dean for undergraduate programs, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Sara B. Blair, vice provost for academic and faculty affairs, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective Sept. 1, 2021, through Aug. 31, 2022.

Steven P. Broglio, associate dean for graduate affairs, School of Kinesiology, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

*Charles L. Brooks III, director, program in biophysics, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Thomas C. Buchmueller, senior associate dean for faculty and research, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Gregory D. Cartee, associate dean for research, School of Kinesiology, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

Peter M. Chen, chair, division of computer science and engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Matthew J. Countryman, chair, Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Gaurav G. Desai, chair, Department of English Language and Literature, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Gregory E. Dowd, chair, Department of American Culture, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

Mary E. Gallagher, director, International Institute, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Bradley L. Killaly, associate dean for MBA programs, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Susan M. Juster, chair, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

*Mayuram S. Krishnan, associate dean for executive programs, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Francine Lafontaine, associate dean for business + impact, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Artemis S. Leontis, chair, Department of Classical Studies, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Preeti N. Malani, chief health officer, Office of the President, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

Karla Mallette, chair, Department of Middle East Studies, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Bruce A. Mueller, interim dean, College of Pharmacy, effective July 1, 2020.

*Mark S. Mizruchi, director, Organizational Studies Program, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

Manjunath P. Pai, chair, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

*Paul J. Resnick, associate dean for research and faculty affairs, School of Information, effective Aug. 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Harry Luke Shaefer, associate dean for research and policy engagement, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Catherine Shakespeare, associate dean for teaching and learning, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Gretchen M. Spreitzer, associate dean for engaged learning and professional development, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Melvin Stephens, Jr., chair, Department of Economics, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

Nicola Terrenato, director, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Patricia J. Wittkopp, chair, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, LSA, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

David B. Wooten, associate dean for one-year masters programs, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Other transactions

A. Van Jordan, correction to effective date of additional appointment, professor in the Residential College, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2024.

Sofia D. Merajver, GreaterGood Breast Cancer Research Professor, Medical School, effective June 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Dearborn campus

*Stein Brunvand, associate dean, College of Education, Health, and Human Services, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Susan A. Everett, chair, Department of Education, College of Education, Health, and Human Services, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

H. James Gilmore, acting chair, Department of Language, Culture, and Communication, and acting chair, Department of Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

*Jorge González del Pozo, chair, Department of Language, Culture, and Communication, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Lisa A. Martin, interim chair, Department of Health and Human Services, College of Education, Health, and Human Services, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021.

Flint campus

*Dauda Abubakar, chair, Department of Africana Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Nicole L. Broughton, acting chair, Department of Theatre and Dance, College of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

Constance J. Creech, interim dean, School of Nursing, effective Aug. 1, 2020, through Jan. 31, 2021.

Sonja Feist-Price, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective Aug. 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

Hillary J. Heinze, chair, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Keith J. Kelley, acting chair, Department of Accounting, Finance, and International Business, School of Management, effective July 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

*Yener Kandogan, associate dean, School of Management, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

*Reappointments

Retirements

Jane F. Fulcher, professor of music in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, June 30, 2020. Fulcher received her Bachelor of Music degree in 1972 from the Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts (since renamed The University of the Arts) and her Master of Arts degree in 1974 and her Ph.D. in 1977 from Columbia University. She served on the faculties of Syracuse University and Indiana University. Fulcher joined U-M as a professor in 2007. She taught courses and seminars that focused on 19th– and particularly 20th-century music within its larger cultural, social, political and intellectual contexts. A specialist in French music, she was especially interested in the relation between music and cultural theory from a sociological, anthropological, historical and literary perspective. The founder and editor-in-chief of the monograph series “The Oxford Handbook of The New Cultural History of Music at Oxford University Press,” she authored several books and published at least 52 journal articles. Fulcher was awarded fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin), the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris and the National Humanities Center.

Tamara L. Gay, clinical associate professor of psychiatry in the Medical School, July 1, 2020. Gay received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1976 and her Doctor of Medicine degree in 1980 from the University of Kentucky. She completed her psychiatry residency from 1980-84 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she then served as a clinical instructor from 1984-85. She was on the faculty of the University of Kentucky from 1985-86 and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1989-93. Gay joined U-M as a lecturer in 1993. She was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 1996 and to clinical associate professor in 2011. Gay has had a long-standing interest in developmental trajectories of young adults as they navigate significant milestones. In 1994, she co-founded and served as the first director of the U-M Medical Student Mental Health Consultation Service. She co-founded a similar program for physicians in training, the U-M House Officer Mental Health Program, in 1996. In 1998, she joined the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry and served multiple leadership positions, including president in 2013. In 2012, Gay was named the assistant dean for student services at the Medical School.

Stephen S. Gebarski, professor of radiology in the Medical School, June 30, 2020. Gebarski received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1978. He completed his internal medicine internship from 1978-79, radiology residency from 1979-82 and neuroradiology fellowship from 1981-83 at the University of Michigan. He joined U-M as an instructor in 1982. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1983, to associate professor in 1987 and to professor in 1996. Gebarski was a pre-eminent scholar in the field of neuroradiology. His research focused on the correlation of imaging alterations with clinical and pathologic findings, especially in neuro-oncology and inflammatory central neurologic diseases. Gebarski’s 1985 study of MRI in multiple sclerosis was one of the earliest systematic investigations of imaging findings in this disease. His investigations of pituitary volumetrics in Cushing’s disease stimulated extensive studies by worldwide investigators using pituitary volumetrics in numerous other diseases affecting the pituitary gland. He served as chair of the Medical School Institutional Review Board, division director of neuroradiology, chair of the American Society of Neuroradiology’s Scientific Exhibits Committee and associate editor of the journal Radiology. 

James A. Goulet, professor of orthopaedic surgery in the Medical School, June 30, 2020. Goulet received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the Cornell University Medical College in 1981. He completed his general surgery internship in 1981-82 at St. Luke’s Hospital (Roosevelt Medical Center), his orthopaedic surgery residency from 1982-86 at the Hospital for Special Surgery and his orthopaedic traumatology fellowship from 1986-87 at the University of California, Davis Medical Center. He joined U-M as an instructor in 1987, was promoted to assistant professor in 1989, to associate professor in 1994 and to professor in 2000. He held several leadership roles in the Department of Surgery and the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He was appointed founder and chief of the Division of Orthopaedic Trauma in 1987, founder and chief of the Bone Health Service in 2012, and founder and chief of the co-managed Geriatric Fracture Service in 2015. He held leadership roles in the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Orthopaedic Association, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and the Michigan Orthopaedic Society. Goulet received the Medical School’s William S. Smith, M.D. Outstanding Teacher Award, the Senior Award, the Outstanding Clinician Award and the Waldomar M. Roeser Golden Scalpel Award, and was inducted into the League of Clinical Excellence.

Margaret R. Gyetko, professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, June 30, 2020. Gyetko received her Bachelor of Arts degree from U-M in 1975 and her Doctor of Medicine degree from Michigan State University in 1981. She completed her internal medicine internship from 1981-82, her internal medicine residency from 1982-84 and her pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship from 1985-88 at U-M. She also served as the internal medicine chief resident from 1984-85. Gyetko joined U-M and the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System as a clinical instructor in 1988. She was promoted to assistant professor in 1991, to associate professor in 1997 and to professor in 2007. Gyetko was a leader in the field of pulmonary and critical care, with special expertise in the areas of immunologic lung disease, pulmonary fibrosis and asthma COPD. She served as assistant chief of internal medicine at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System from 1996-2007, associate dean for faculty affairs in the Medical School from 2007-11 and senior associate dean for faculty and faculty development in the Medical School from 2011-20. She was a member of the American Association of Immunologists, the Association of American Medical Colleges, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Thoracic Society. 

Jessica M. Hahn, professor of theatre and drama in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, June 30, 2020. Hahn received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1970 from the University of Illinois and her Master of Fine Arts degree in 1992 from Carnegie Mellon University. She joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1994. She was promoted to associate professor in 1997 and to professor in 2011. Hahn headed the Design & Production area for 19 years. She came to Michigan from the world of professional theatre, having worked predominantly in the Midwest with numerous world premieres in drama, musical theatre, dance, opera, ice shows and corporate industrial shows. At U-M, Hahn designed more than 60 shows. For the past 23 years, Hahn has led the preservation and cataloging of the Department of Theatre & Drama’s historical costume collection. She received Chicago’s Joseph Jefferson Award in 1977, 1978 and 1982, and a Charles MacArthur Award in 1973, for her costume designs. She is the curator of the Historic Costume Collection. In addition, Hahn has tried her hand at restaurant design, including Bella Italia, for which she was awarded an Excellence in Design by the Port Angeles, Washington Chamber of Commerce. 

Karen S. Harlow-Rosentraub, research associate professor in the School of Social Work, June 30, 2020. Harlow-Rosentraub earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969 and her Master of Arts degree in 1971 from Texas A&M University-Commerce in Commerce, Texas. She received her Ph.D. in 1981 from The University of Texas at Arlington in Arlington, Texas. She joined U-M as an assistant research scientist in May 2010 and was appointed research associate professor that September. Harlow-Rosentraub’s research focused on program evaluation, aging policy, community-based needs assessment for national and community service, lifelong learning and older citizens. She specialized in evaluation research and aging policy. She directed the national, multisite evaluation efforts for the Legacy Corps for Health and Independent Living, a national demonstration for the Corporation for National and Community Service. Her work focused on developing evidence-based policy recommendations for best practices in using baby boomer and older volunteers to address health challenges and sustainable, community problem-solving projects. Harlow-Rosentraub worked throughout the United States and Europe to shape policy initiatives supporting active engagement and lifelong learning for older citizens.

Craig Harris, Dow Professor of Toxicology, professor of toxicology, and professor of nutritional sciences in the School of Public Health, May 31, 2020. Harris received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1978 and his Master of Science degree in 1980 from Brigham Young University, and his Ph.D. in 1985 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From 1985-88, he carried out postdoctoral research in developmental toxicology in the Department of Pharmacology in the School of Medicine at the University of Washington, and was appointed as a research assistant professor. Harris joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1988, was promoted to associate professor in 1995 and to professor in 2003. Harris was an international authority in toxicology and mechanisms of developmental toxicology and birth defects. He served on Public Health’s Executive Committee and was director of the Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship curriculum. He also served as the director of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences’ Toxicology Program, and was the NSF International Chair of Environmental Health Sciences from 2014-17. Harris served on editorial boards of toxicology journals, edited books and published book chapters and scientific articles. From 2000-01, he was president of the Michigan Chapter of the Society of Toxicology.

Jeffrey M. Jentzen, clinical professor of pathology in the Medical School, July 1, 2020. Jentzen received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1975 from Michigan Technological University and his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1980 from Wayne State University. He received a Master of Science degree in 1997 and a Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He completed his anatomic and clinical pathology residency at the Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis and a forensic pathology fellowship at the Hennepin County Medical Examiner Office. Jentzen is board-certified in anatomic, clinical and forensic pathology. He served as medical examiner of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, from 1987-2008, as well as on the faculties of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Medical College of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He joined U-M as a clinical professor in 2008. Jentzen has been the medical examiner of Washtenaw County, Michigan, since 2008. In 1996, he authored “Medicolegal Death Investigator: A Systematic Training Program for the Professional Death Investigator,” and has published on numerous historical topics of death investigation, including a forthcoming book titled “Instruments of Empire: Death Investigation in the Colonial Perspective.” Jentzen was the 2018 recipient of the Milton Helpern Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Association of Medical Examiners.

Fritz A. Kaenzig, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and professor of music in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, May 31, 2020. Kaenzig received his Bachelor of Music Education degree in 1974 from The Ohio State University and his Master of Music degree in 1975 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He taught on the faculties of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Northern Iowa. He joined U-M as associate professor in 1989 and was promoted to professor in 1995. Kaenzig is a past president of the Tubists Universal Brotherhood Association, now known as the International Tuba Euphonium Association, and currently serves on its Board of Advisors. He served as principal tubist of the Florida Symphony Orchestra and as additional or substitute tubist with Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw Orchestra and the symphony orchestras of Detroit, San Francisco, Houston, Chicago, Los Angeles and St. Louis. In May 2019, Kaenzig performed as substitute principal tubist of the Chicago Symphony. From 1984-2018, he was principal tubist in the Grant Park (Chicago) Orchestra. Kaenzig received SMTD’s Harold Haugh Award in 1999, The Ohio State University School of Music’s Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2012 and the International Tuba Euphonium Association’s Teaching Award in 2019. 

Elijah Kannatey-Asibu, Jr., professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering, June 30, 2020. Kannatey-Asibu received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, Ghana, in 1974. He received a Master of Science degree and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1977 and 1980, respectively. Kannatey-Asibu served on the faculty of the General Motors Institute from 1980-82 before joining U-M as an assistant professor in 1983. He was promoted to associate professor in 1988 and to professor in 1994. Kannatey-Asibu’s expertise focused on the multi-sensor monitoring of manufacturing processes, the laser processing of materials and the acoustic emission investigation of manufacturing processes. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Kannatey-Asibu received the ASME’s Blackall Machine Tool and Gage Award in 1986, the American Foundrymen Society’s Best Paper Award in 1995, the American Welding Society’s A.F. Davis Silver Medal Award in 1998, the SME’s Education Award in 2015, the Department of Mechanical Engineering’s Excellence in Service Award in 1997 and the Excellence in Research Award in 1998, and the College of Engineering’s Outreach and Diversity Award in 2009-10. He also received U-M’s Robert Caddell Memorial Award in 2000 and Harold Johnson Diversity Service Award in 2010.

Nikolaos D. Katopodes, professor of civil and environmental engineering in the College of Engineering, June 30, 2020. Katopodes received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1972 from Aristotle University in Greece, and a Bachelor of Science degree in 1976, a Master of Science degree in 1974 and a Ph.D. in 1977 from the University of California, Davis. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1981, was promoted to associate professor in 1987 and to professor in 1996. Katopodes chaired the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering from 2001-06. He also held several visiting positions and served as a consultant to several federal and state agencies, foreign governments and corporations. Katopodes’ research covered a wide range of topics varying from environmental fluid mechanics to surface hydrology, to wave mechanics and industrial multiphase flows. Katopodes published three books and his research resulted in more than 200 publications and several software packages. He received the Karl Emil Hilgard Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1990, the Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award from U-M in 2010 and an honorary doctorate from the University of Thessaly in Greece in 2013. He was a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

David E. Kieras, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the College of Engineering and professor of psychology in LSA, June 30, 2020. Kieras received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969 from Rice University and his Ph.D. in 1974 from U-M. He had an R.K. Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship from 1974-76 at Carnegie Mellon University. Kieras was on the faculty of the University of Arizona before joining U-M as an associate professor in 1985. He was promoted to professor in 2002. His research focused on applied and theoretical cognitive psychology, particularly in human-computer interaction, cognitive simulation modeling, human performance, complex human learning and natural language processing. His approach has been to construct computational models for the cognitive processes involved in tasks that have practical importance, to validate the models against empirical data, and to prepare them for practical application. Starting in 1994, Kieras and his collaborators developed the Executive-Process Interactive Control computational cognitive architecture for modeling human cognition and performance. Kieras received the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society’s Jack A. Kraft Innovator Award in 2010 and the College of Engineering’s Education Excellence Award in 2007. He was elected a member of the SIGCHI Academy in 2010.

Mary D. Kleaveland, clinical assistant professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, June 30, 2020. Kleaveland received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1978, her Master of Public Health degree in 1979 and her Doctor of Medicine degree in 1983 from U-M. She completed her postgraduate training at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York, in 1987. She was on the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Indiana University School of Medicine, before joining U-M as a clinical assistant professor in 1996. In her role as an outpatient clinician at the West Ann Arbor Health Center, Kleaveland managed a large, complex panel of general internal medicine patients, consistently maintaining excellent scores on multiple quality indicators and outstanding patient satisfaction scores. She was chosen as a faculty mentor for U-M medical students participating in the Home Healthcare Pilot Program in 2016. Kleaveland received the Richard D. Judge Award for Excellence in Medical Student Teaching in 2011. She was elected to the Academic Laureati Medici (Clinical Excellence Society) in 2017. Kleaveland also served as a member of the Clinical Guidelines Committee on Venous Thromboembolism for 16 years, and was an active member of the Gradwohl Art of Primary Care Committee for four years.  

Ronald J. Koenig, professor of internal medicine and director of the Medical Scientist Training Program in the Medical School, May 31, 2020. Koenig received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1972 from Yale University, his Ph.D. in 1977 from Rockefeller University and his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1978 from the Cornell Medical College. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine and fellowship training in endocrinology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. He was on the faculty at Harvard Medical School before joining U-M as an associate professor in 1988. He was promoted to professor in 1995. Koenig was the director of the Medical Scientist Training Program from 1995-2020 and was an internationally recognized leader in his field whose research spanned diabetes and thyroid disease. Koenig has nearly 100 peer-reviewed publications, was an editor of the current edition of “Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” and had an outstanding record of extramural funding. He received numerous awards and served as chair of the NIH Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology Study Section. In addition, he was an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians, as well as a committed educator.

William R. Martin, professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences in the College of Engineering, May 31, 2020. Martin received his Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree in 1967 from U-M and his Master of Science degree in 1968 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received an Master of Science in Engineering degree in 1975 and a Ph.D. in 1976 from U-M. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1977, was promoted to associate professor in 1983 and to professor in 1988. Martin was associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Engineering from 1994-99 and chair of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences from 1990-94 and 2004-10. He was founding director of the Laboratory for Scientific Computations from 1986-91, founding director of the Center for Parallel Computing from 1993-94, director of the Center for Advanced Computing from 2002-04 and interim director of the Michigan Grid Research and Infrastructure Development Center from 2002-04. He chaired or served on advisory boards and review panels for the nation’s nuclear weapons laboratories and the National Academy of Engineering, and was an American Nuclear Society fellow. Martin received the American Society for Engineering Education’s Glenn Murphy Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award from the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the College of Engineering.

Vincent Mountain, professor of theatre and drama in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, June 30, 2020. Mountain received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1986 from Pennsylvania State University and his Master of Fine Arts degree in 1992 from the University of California, San Diego. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1994, was promoted to associate professor in 2002 and to professor in 2011. As a member of the design faculty, Mountain designed scenery for 52 productions, including theatre, dance, musical theatre and opera. He also headed the Design & Production area from 2000-07 and on the SMTD Executive Committee from 2015-18. Mountain worked professionally as a scenic designer for small experimental companies, regional theatres, opera companies, commercial theatres, television and film. His notable American companies include the Alley Theatre, Geffen Playhouse, La Jolla Playhouse, Philadelphia Theatre Company, Seattle Repertory Theatre, Williamstown Theatre Festival and Wolf Trap Opera Company. Mountain received a National Endowment for the Arts/Theatre Communications Group Design Fellowship and served as an adjudicator for the NEA/TCG Career Development Program for Designers. He also chaired the International Activities Committee for the United States Institute for Theatre Technology and was associate curator for the Prague Quadrennial 2019 USA National Exhibit.

Carmen Pelton, professor of music in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, June 30, 2020. Pelton received her Bachelor of Music degree in 1977 from the University of Wisconsin and her Performer’s Certificate in 1980 from The Eastman School. She joined U-M as an associate professor in 2001 and was promoted to professor in 2015. Pelton was recognized in the field of vocal performance with awards from the Metropolitan Opera Guild, the George Sullivan Foundation and the Liederkranz Foundation. She was a pre-eminent performer in the field of classical vocal performance, confirmed through her participation as featured soprano soloist on two Grammy Award-winning “Best Classical Album” recordings. As a scholar, her approach to an integrative and holistic vocal pedagogy resulted in the pioneering and groundbreaking exploration of Dalcroze Eurythmics, Yi Ren Qigong, Hatha Yoga and Feldenkreis as each applied to professional performance pedagogy in the classical vocal arts. Pelton was regularly invited to be a vocal soloist with distinguished music festivals, including the Aspen Music Festival, the Shen-Yang International Chamber Music Festival of China, the Brevard Music Festival, the Aldeburgh Music Festival and the Berkshire Choral Festival. She won the U-M Harold Haugh Award for excellence in studio teaching in 2008.  

Gregory Poggi, professor of theatre and drama in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, June 30, 2020. Poggi received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968 degree from Iona College, and his Master of Arts degree in 1969 and Ph.D. in 1977 from Indiana University. He joined U-M as a professor in 2005. Poggi successfully led resident professional theatres in the United States and Canada for more than 22 years. He was a founder of the Indiana Repertory Theatre, served as managing director of the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre in Winnipeg, was the founding chair of the Professional Association of Canadian Theatres in Toronto, and was artistic and producing director of the Philadelphia Drama Guild at the Annenberg Center of the University of Pennsylvania. Poggi’s production history spans more than 120 works. He has collaborated with many Tony Award-winning actors, directors and designers, and was chair of the Division of Arts Administration in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas for 15 years. From 2005-10, Poggi chaired the U-M Department of Theatre & Drama. In 2011, he founded the minor in performing arts management, now established as the Department of Performing Arts Management and Entrepreneurship, and MPulse Theatre, a summer program for high school students.

Brian P. Rowan, professor of education in the School of Education, professor of sociology in LSA, and research professor in the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research, June 30, 2020. Rowan received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Rutgers University in 1972 and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1978.  He was an associate research scientist, senior research scientist and senior research director at Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development in San Francisco, California, and on the faculty of Michigan State University. Rowan joined U-M as associate professor in 1991 and was promoted to professor in 1994. Rowan made pioneering contributions to organization theory and to education research on school and teaching effectiveness. At U-M, he focused mainly on the study of education practice, directed large-scale studies of school improvement interventions, conducted descriptive studies of teaching practice and studied teacher evaluation practices in schools. He consulted with government and private research organizations, philanthropic organizations, professional organizations and scholarly societies. Rowan was a member of the U.S. National Academy of Education and a past recipient of the William J. Davis Award for outstanding scholarship in the field of educational administration from the University Council on Educational Administration.

Yi Sun, Theodore S. Lawrence, M.D., Ph.D. and Patricia Krause Research Professor of Radiation Oncology, andprofessor of radiation oncology in the Medical School, April 13, 2020. Sun received his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1982 from Jiangxi Medical College in Nanchang, China, his Master of Science degree in 1986 from Zhejiang Medical University in Hangzhou, China, and his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Iowa. He continued his training as a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Rochester in New York through 1990, then completed a fellowship at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland in 1992. He held various positions at the National Cancer Institute, Parke-Davis and Pfizer Global Research & Development. Sun joined U-M as an associate professor in 2003 and was promoted to professor in 2008. Sun’s research focused on validation of SAG (Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene)-Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL) as a promising cancer target for anti-cancer drug discovery. Sun authored more than 200 publications in scientific peer-reviewed journals and published 11 book chapters. His work supported pioneering technologies and continued improvements in clinical outcomes for patients with lung tumors.

June Manning Thomas, Mary Frances Berry Distinguished University Professor of Urban Planning, and professor of urban and regional planning in the A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, June 30, 2020. Thomas received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Michigan State University in 1970 and her Ph.D. from U-M in 1977.  She was on the faculties of Michigan State and Cleveland State University and was director of the MSU Urban and Regional Planning Program. Thomas joined U-M as a Centennial Professor and professor of urban planning in 2007. She is a fellow in the American Institute of Certified Planners and was president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning. She co-founded and co-chaired the Planners of Color Interest Group, whose mission is to advance the interests and concerns of people and communities of color within the planning academia and the profession. Thomas was named the Mary Frances Berry Distinguished University Professor in 2016. She was awarded the ACSP’s annual Paul Davidoff Award in 1999 for her book, “Redevelopment and Race: Planning A Finer City in Postwar Detroit.” Thomas was also honored with the Laurence Gerckens Prize for Sustained Excellence in the Teaching of Planning History, presented by the Society for American City and Regional Planning History. 

James K. Wight, F.E. Richart, Jr. Collegiate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and professor of civil and environmental engineering in the College of Engineering, June 30, 2020. Wight received his Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree in 1969 and his Master of Science in Engineering degree in 1970 from Michigan State University. He received his Ph.D. in 1973 from the University of Illinois. He joined U-M as assistant professor in 1973, was promoted to associate professor in 1979 and to professor in 1986. Wight was well-known for his work in earthquake-resistant design and seismic upgrading of concrete structures. Wight was an active member of the American Concrete Institute and named a fellow of the institute in 1984. He held several positions within ACI, including president from 2012-13. He won several awards from ACI including the Structural Research Award, the Wason Medal for the most meritorious paper in 2012, the Joe W. Kelly Award for educational excellence and the Delmar Bloem Award for Distinguished Service. Wight also received many U-M awards, including the CoE 38E Award, the CoE Teaching Excellence Award, the CoE Excellence in Faculty Service Award and the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies’ Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award.

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