Regents Roundup — December 2021

Topics:

The following items also were approved Dec. 9 at the Board of Regents meeting:

Regents update asset allocation ranges for long-term investment portfolio

An updated “model portfolio” allows the University of Michigan’s long-term investment portfolio, which consists mostly of the endowment, to include a greater amount of venture and private equity investments — a maximum of 45 percent, up from 35 percent last year. The model portfolio provides investment allocation ranges for each individual asset class, such as real estate, equities and cash. Venture and private equity investments are ones in which U-M commits a fixed amount to be invested by the investment managers directly into companies that the managers will work to grow and ultimately sell over a 15- to 20-year period. The university’s portfolio of these investments is mature, and investment managers expect a substantial number of sales in investee companies in the coming years that will reduce the overall allocation to this asset class. The increase in the maximum allowable allocation to venture and private equity — one of the university’s alternative, or illiquid, asset classes — required regents to also approve an increase in the maximum allowable allocation for its total alternative assets, from 55 to 65 percent.

U-M submits capital outlay request for Church Street building

The university submitted a request through the state’s capital outlay process earlier this fall to fund the renovation of a building at 428 Church St. on the Ann Arbor campus. Geoffrey Chatas, executive vice president and chief financial officer, wrote in a memo to regents that the Church Street building renovation project would cost an estimated $50 million and would enable U-M to address updates to the Chemistry Building complex in a longer-term initiative. U-M also submitted five-year master plans for the Ann Arbor, Dearborn and Flint campuses as part of the process devoted to planning and financing the acquisition, construction and renovation of facilities used by universities and community colleges. When a project is made possible through the capital outlay process, the investment is shared between the university and the state. The Dearborn and Flint campuses did not submit project funding requests for consideration this year.

Chiller replacement approved for East University

The East University Chiller Plant, which is part of the water loop that serves several Central Campus buildings, will be replaced to increase reliability, reduce operational and maintenance costs and support the university’s goal to use renewable electricity. The $7.8 million project will replace outdated electric chillers along with related pumps and substations to maintain required redundancy for current cooling loads. The architectural firm of Tower, Pinkster, Titus Associates Inc. will design the project, which is scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2023.

Electrical upgrades planned for University Hospital 

An $11.7 million project planned for University Hospital will move forward with installing an electrical substation, penthouse mechanical enclosure and associated systems to provide increased electrical capacity to the hospital. While the new substation is installed, the hospital cafeteria ceiling will be removed and replaced with a reinforced steel structure to handle the increased weight. The current substation is more than 30 years old and is nearing the capacity limit required to support future facility upgrades. The project, which will be designed by the architectural firm of Stanley Consultants, is scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2024. There will be no impact on parking around the facility. 

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

Hero K. Hussain, professor of radiology, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2022.

Named professorships

Joshi J. Alumkal, Wicha Family Professor of Oncology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2021, through Aug. 31, 2026.

Jennifer Bridwell-Rabb, William R. Roush Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2024.

*Mark A. Burns, T.C. Chang Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2026.

Joshua A. Buss, Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2024.

*Sherman J. Clark, Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, Law School, effective Dec. 1, 2021, through Nov. 30, 2026.

Andrew C. Grogan-Kaylor, Sandra K. Danziger Collegiate Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work, effective Nov. 1, 2021, through Oct. 31, 2026.

Hitinder S. Gurm, Park Willis III Collegiate Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2021, through Aug. 31, 2026.

Lorraine M. Gutiérrez, Edith A. Lewis Collegiate Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work, effective Nov. 1, 2021, through Oct. 31, 2026.

Baris C.C. Kasikci, Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2023.

*Nicholas Kotov, Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2026.

*Paul P. Lee, F. Bruce Fralick Professor of Ophthalmology, Medical School, effective March 1, 2022, through Feb. 28, 2025.

Ann Chih Lin, Richard H. Rogel Professor of Chinese Studies, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2025.

***Kevin J. Maki, Richard B. Couch Development Professor of Marine Hydrodynamics, College of Engineering, effective Oct. 1, 2021, through Sept. 30, 2022.

**Arnold S. Monto, Thomas Francis, Jr. Collegiate Professor of Public Health, School of Public Health, effective Nov. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2021.

Katherine M. Moxley, George W. Morley Collegiate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Aug. 31, 2026.

*Trevor N. Mudge, Bredt Family Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2026.

Alison R.H. Narayan, Mary Sue Coleman Collegiate Professor in the Life Sciences, LSA, effective Dec. 1, 2021, through Aug. 31, 2026.

Andrew J. Putnam, Robert C. Leland, Jr. and Donna D. Leland Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Cardiovascular Medicine, College of Engineering and Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2026.

Lori Quinlan Riegger, Sujit and Uma A. Pandit Professor of Pediatric Anesthesiology, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Aug. 31, 2026.

Deborah Rivas-Drake, Stephanie Johnson Rowley Collegiate Professor of Education, School of Education, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2026.

*Armin W. Troesch, ABS Professor of Marine and Offshore Design Performance, College of Engineering, effective March 1, 2022, through Feb. 28, 2027.

Administrative appointments

George A. Garcia, interim chair, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Aug. 31, 2023.

Joseph A. Himle, interim dean, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2022.

Kyle D. Logue, associate dean for faculty and research, Law School, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Aug. 31, 2023.

**Ekaterina Velikov, associate dean for research and creative practice, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, effective Oct. 1, 2021, through Aug. 31, 2024.

Other transactions

Heidi Huber-Stearns, Theodore Roosevelt Visiting Professor of Ecosystem Management, School for Environment and Sustainability, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2023.

**Janet Leahy, John H. Mitchell Visiting Professor in Media Entertainment, Department of Film, Television, and Media, LSA, effective Oct. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2021.

Chandan Reddy, Norman Freehling Visiting Professor, Institute for the Humanities, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through April 30, 2022.

Flint campus

Aneil Mishra, dean, effective Jan. 1, 2022, through Dec. 31, 2026, and professor of management, with tenure, School of Management, effective Jan. 1, 2022.

Syagnik Banerjee, interim vice provost for academic affairs, Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2022.

*Reappointments
**Interim approval granted
***Reappointment and interim approval granted

Retirements

David S. Bach, Park W. Willis III Collegiate Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and clinical professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, Nov. 12, 2021. Bach received his B.A. from Kalamazoo College in 1980 and his M.D. from the University of Michigan in 1986. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Chicago and his fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at U-M. Bach joined U-M’s Department of Internal Medicine as a clinical assistant professor in 1992. He was promoted to clinical associate professor in 1997 and to clinical professor in 2004. Bach’s clinical and research interests focused on the diagnosis and management of patients with heart valve disease. He was an advocate for patient education informing individualized clinical decision making. In recognition of his clinical work, he was inducted in U-M’s Department of Internal Medicine Academiae Laureati MediciClinical Excellence Society in 2014. Bach authored or co-authored 135 peer-reviewed publications and 16 book chapters, lectured extensively on six continents and served on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, the Journal of Heart Valve Disease, Structural Heart and ACC.org Journal Scan.

Rosario Ceballo, professor of psychology, and of women’s and gender studies in LSA, Dec. 31, 2021. Ceballo received her B.A. in 1987 from Yale University. She received her M.A. in 1992 and her Ph.D. in 1995 from the University of Michigan. Ceballo joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1997. She was promoted to associate professor in 2004 and to professor in 2014. Ceballo has investigated how living in poverty affects women, children and families, conducted research on Latino families and examined the experience of infertility among women of color. She received the 2004 William and Janet Cassebaum Scholarship Award for Research and the 2010 Committee on Women in Psychology Leadership Award from the American Psychological Association. Ceballo also received the 2014 John Dewey Award from LSA. She received a 2020 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award and worked on ADVANCE’s LIFT Program, the President’s Advisory Committee on Women’s Issues, the Provost’s Office Detroit Center Task Force, the Center for the Education of Women, the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the Firearm Injury Prevention Steering Committee. She chaired the Department of Women’s Studies from 2015-18 and was associate dean for social sciences in LSA from 2018-21.

Robert J. Denver, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology, and of ecology and evolutionary biology in LSA, Dec. 31, 2021. Denver received his B.S. from Rutgers University in 1984 and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1989. He conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, U-C Berkeley, and the National Institutes of Health. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1994. He was promoted to associate professor in 2000 and to professor in 2006. He has served as associate chair for undergraduate studies, associate chair for research and facilities, and chair of the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. Denver was instrumental in the design, construction and habitation of the Biological Sciences Building. He is recognized for discoveries on the molecular mechanisms of hormone action during brain development and the pivotal roles of hormones in mediating the interaction between genes and the environment. Denver published more than 130 scientific articles. He co-founded and served as the first president of the North American Society for Comparative Endocrinology and was president of the International Federation of Comparative Endocrinological Societies. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Jonathan E. Freedman, Marvin Felheim Collegiate Professor of English, American Studies and Judaic Studies, professor of English language and literature, of American culture, and of Judaic studies in LSA, Sept. 30, 2021. Freedman earned a B.A. from Northwestern University in 1977, and a Master of Philosophy degree in 1980 and a doctorate in 1985 from Yale University. Freedman was an assistant professor at Yale before joining U-M as an associate professor of English and American studies in 1991. He was promoted to professor in 1999. Freedman is a theorist and interpreter of the cultures and culture making of modernity. His most recent book, “The Jewish Decadence: Jews and the Aesthetics of Modernity,” is an account of Jewish writers, artists and intellectuals making their way into Western European and Anglo-American cultural centers and encountering the avant-garde movement known as decadence. Freedman’s other publications include “Klezmer America: Jewishness, Ethnicity, Modernity,” “The Temple of Culture: Assimilation, and the Making of Literary Anglo-America,” and “Professions of Taste: Henry James, British Aestheticism, and Commodity Culture.” He was a senior fellow at the Michigan Society of Fellows and was associate chair of the Department of English Language and Literature.

Beth Genné, professor of dance in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, and professor of art history in the Residential College, LSA, Dec. 31, 2021. Genné received her B.A. in music literature in 1966, her M.A. in 1968 and her Ph.D. in 1984 in the history of art from U-M. She joined U-M in 1987 and, after serving in a number of positions, was appointed assistant professor in 1994. She was promoted to associate professor in 1997 and to professor in 2009. Her specialties are 20th century ballet in America and Europe and dance in the American musical film. Prior to coming to U-M, Genné taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She worked to establish the discipline of dance history and to encourage the study of dance’s interaction with other art forms. She is a co-founder of U-M’s Center for World Performance Studies. Genné authored the book, “The Making of a Choreographer: Ninette de Valois and Bar aux Folies-Bergère,” and chapters on film dance in several anthologies. Her scholarly articles have appeared in British and American journals such as Discourses in Dance, Dance Chronicle, Dance Research and the Art Journal.

Roma Gianchandani, clinical professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, Dec. 6, 2021. Gianchandani received her medical degree from Topiwala National Medical College in Mumbai, India, in 1986 and completed her internal medicine residency at Wayne State University in 1992. After completing her endocrinology fellowship at U-M, she became a lecturer at the university. She then moved to Dean Clinic in Wisconsin before returning to U-M as a clinical instructor in 2002. She was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 2006, to clinical associate professor in 2014 and to clinical professor in 2019. She was nominated as associate vice chair for quality and innovation in the Department of Internal Medicine in 2020. Gianchandani established the Hospital Diabetes Program, which changed the paradigm of diabetes care in Michigan Medicine. Her work helped establish the U-M Hospital as a national leader in hospital diabetes care. Gianchandani has also been a leader in quality improvement initiatives and support and led the Department of Internal Medicine’s quality team beginning in 2019. Her clinical program won several patient safety awards, and she won the Dean’s Outstanding Clinician Award in 2018. She was inducted into the Department of Internal Medicine’s Clinical Excellence Society in 2013.

Margaret E. Gnegy, professor of pharmacology in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2021. Gnegy received her B.S. in chemistry in 1971 and her Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1975 from West Virginia University. She joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1977, was promoted to associate professor in 1984 and to professor in 1990. Gnegy’s research career focused on the regulation of the dopamine system in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Gnegy served as director of the U-M Substance Research Center, as PI of the NIDA-funded U-M Substance Abuse Interdisciplinary Training Program and as chair of the Graduate Program Committee and associate chair for education in the Department of Pharmacology. She has served as chair of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Neuropharmacology Division, on the Julius Axelrod Award Committee, a member of the General Awards Committee, a member of the ASPET Surf Award Task Force, a member of the ASPET Travel Award Task Force, and chaired the Awards Committee from 2016-17. She also served on the ASPET Mentoring and Career Development Committee and the ASPET Global Task Force. In 2021, she was elected ASPET president. The Center for the Education of Women endowed a scholarship in honor of Gnegy.

Edie N. Goldenberg, professor of political science in LSA, and professor of public policy in the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Dec. 31, 2021. Goldenberg received her S.B. in political science in 1967 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and her M.A. in 1968 and Ph.D. in 1974 from Stanford University. She joined U-M as an assistant professor of political science in 1974. She spent 1978-80 in the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Goldenberg was promoted to professor of political science and public policy in 1986. She was director of the Institute of Public Policy Studies from 1987-89. From 1989-98, she was dean of LSA, the first woman appointed to the position. During her term, the college established the First-Year Seminar Program and theme semesters, the Sweetland Center for Writing and the International Institute. Her scholarship focused on the role of the mass media in political campaigns and public policy, on the functioning of the federal bureaucracy and on issues related to higher education. Goldenberg was elected to the National Academy of Public Administration in 1987. She received the Goldsmith Research Award from Harvard University, a U-M Faculty Recognition Award and the Sarah Goddard Power Award.

Carmen Renee Green, professor of anesthesiology, and of obstetrics and gynecology in the Medical School, professor of health management and policy in the School of Public Health, and attending physician in the Back and Pain Center, Oct. 1, 2021. Green received her B.S. in 1983 from UM-Flint and her M.D. in 1987 from the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. She joined U-M as a lecturer in 1993. She was promoted to assistant professor in 1996, to associate professor in 2003 and to professor in 2009. As a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy fellow at the National Academy of Medicine and as a health policy analyst in the U.S. Senate’s Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and the Children and Families Subcommittee, Green helped draft several pieces of legislation. She served on advisory committees for the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, the NIH and for public agencies and professional societies. She received the U-M Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service, the Woman of Color of the Year for Human Relations, employee of the year awards, the John Liebeskind Pain Management Research Award and the Elizabeth Narcessian Award for Outstanding Educational Achievements. She was the inaugural associate vice president and associate dean for health equity and inclusion.

Erdogan Gulari, Donald L. Katz Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering and professor of chemical engineering in the College of Engineering, May 31, 2021. Gulari earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from Robert’s College in 1969 and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1973. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1978. He was promoted to associate professor in 1982 and to professor in 1985. He served as a senior associate dean in the College of Engineering from 1986-93. Gulari’s research interests focused on making “biochips” or DNA and peptide chips for gene expression, single nucleotide polymorphism detection, drug-protein interactions and massively parallel polymerase-chain reaction-based detection assays. His patented technology allows for rapid diagnostic applications and was used by Gulari’s company, Arbor Biosciences, to make rapid COVID-19 tests available in large quantities early in the pandemic. Gulari received the Stephen S. Atwood Award for Excellence in Engineering, the College of Engineering’s highest honor, in 2005. He also received the Chemical Engineer of the Year Award from the Detroit Chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the AT&T Foundation Award from the American Society of Engineering Educators. Gulari published more than 220 refereed journal articles, co-founded three startup companies and has eight patents.

Siobán D. Harlow, professor of epidemiology and professor of global public health in the School of Public Health, and professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2021. Harlow earned her B.A. in 1980 from the University of California, Berkeley, and her Ph.D. in 1988 from The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1992, was promoted to associate professor in 1998 and to professor in 2004. She was appointed professor of obstetrics and gynecology in 2015 and professor of global public health in 2017. Harlow has served as director of the Center for Midlife Science since 2011. She was associate director of the International Institute, chaired the President’s Advisory Committee on Labor Standards and Human Rights, and was a member of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Group, Division of Reproductive Health Research, World Health Organization. She was a Fulbright Scholar from 2017-18. She has more than 250 publications. Harlow received the Excellence in Research Award, the Eugene Feingold Excellence in Diversity Award, the Sarah Goddard Power Award, the Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award, the Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award and the Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award.

June Howard, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, professor of English language and literature, of American culture, and of women’s and gender studies in LSA, Dec. 31, 2021. Howard received her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego, in 1979 and joined U-M as an assistant professor that year. She was promoted to associate professor in 1985 and to professor in 2000. Howard’s scholarship made an enduring contribution to the understanding of late 19th and early 20th century literature and culture in the United States. Her first book on literary naturalism in 1985 broke new ground in rethinking the political significance of form and genre. Subsequent explorations of literary sentimentalism culminated in her study “Publishing the Family.” Her work is recognized for its insights into complexities of literary regionalism, a subject analyzed in her book, “The Center of the World: Regional Writing and the Puzzles of Place-Time.” Howard was the first director of the American Culture Program, and its chair when it became a department. She also served as associate dean at the Rackham Graduate School and associate chair of the Department of English Language and Literature, in addition to being named to the Executive Committee of LSA and the Michigan Society of Fellows.

Jeffrey W. Innis, Morton S. and Henrietta K. Sellner Professor of Human Genetics, professor of human genetics, of pediatrics, and of internal medicine in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2021. Innis obtained his Ph.D. and M.D. degrees from the University of Miami School of Medicine in 1983 and 1985, respectively. He completed his training in pediatrics and in molecular and human genetics at Baylor College of Medicine. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1991, was promoted to associate professor in 1998 and to professor in 2007. In 2015, he was appointed professor of internal medicine. Innis developed a long-term research program on skeletal malformations with a focus on Hox gene regulation and function. His research was published in top journals and garnered him numerous grants and awards including the NIGMS James A. Shannon Director’s Award and the U-M Medical School Dean’s Award for Achievement in Basic Science Research. Innis was medical director of the Genetic Counseling Program, founder and director of the Medical Genetics Residency Program, director of the Division of Genetics, Metabolism and Genomic Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics, service chief of the Division of Genetic Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine, and founder and medical director of the Michigan Medical Genetics Laboratories.

Craig A. Jaffe, clinical associate professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, Jan. 1, 2022. Jaffe received his M.D. from the University of Michigan in 1986. He completed his internship and residency at the University of Pittsburgh and then completed an endocrinology and metabolism fellowship at U-M. Jaffe joined U-M as a clinical lecturer in 1993, was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 1995 and to clinical associate professor in 2003. In 1996, he was recruited as a staff physician for the Ann Arbor Veteran’s Affairs Health System. At U-M, Jaffe contributed to many programs within the Department of Internal Medicine’s Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes. From 2003-18, he served as the clinical service chief for the division at U-M and at the VA Ann Arbor, overseeing physician operations in the endocrine practice at all outpatient clinic locations. Jaffe also served as the director of the Hypopituitary Clinic from 2003-17. In 2017, he turned his focus to education as he became the associate chief of staff/education. His received the Endocrine Fellows’ Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award in 2011 and 2021.

Paul R. Kileny, professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery in the Medical School, Dec. 20, 2021. Kileny received his B.S. in 1972 and his M.S. in 1974 in audiology from Tel Aviv University’s Sackler School of Medicine. He earned his Ph.D. in audiology with a neurophysiology emphasis from the University of Iowa in 1978. He joined U-M as an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery and director of the Division of Audiology in 1985. He was promoted to associate professor in 1988 and to professor in 1993. Kileny is a licensed audiologist who co-founded the cochlear implant program and created newborn hearing screening, neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring programs and a fellowship for intraoperative monitoring. He pioneered the use of electrocochleography in the diagnosis and treatment of superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Kileny is the author of more than 150 peer-reviewed publications, more than 30 textbook chapters and “The Audiologist’s Handbook of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring.” Kileny received the Presidential Citation of the American Otological Society, the American Academy of Audiology’s Career Award in Hearing, the American Speech Language Hearing Association’s Honors of the Association Award and the University of Iowa’s Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Jon D. Miller, research scientist in the Institute for Social Research, June 30, 2021. Miller received his A.B. in government from Ohio University in 1963, his M.A. in political science from the University of Chicago in 1965 and his Ph.D. in political science from Northwestern University in 1970. He was the John A. Hannah Professor of Integrative Studies at Michigan State University before joining U-M 2010 as a research scientist and director of the International Center for the Advancement of Scientific Literacy at the Center for Political Studies. Miller conducted research on the development and deployment of survey instruments for notable longitudinal studies funded by NASA, NIH, NSF and many other sponsors. The key foci of Miller’s studies included the measurement of civic scientific literacy and the information acquisition activities and retention of information of citizens seeking to understand current science issues. Miller is a member of the Board of Directors of the Chicago Council on Science and Technology. He is also an expert panelist of Canada’s State of Science Culture for the Council of Canadian Academies, and has served on the editorial boards for the Journal of the Public Understanding of Science and Science Popularization.

Arnold S. Monto, Thomas Francis Collegiate Professor of Public Health, professor of epidemiology, and professor of global public health in the School of Public Health, Dec. 31, 2021. Monto received his B.S. in 1954 from Cornell University and his M.D. in 1958 from Cornell University Medical College. He completed a medical residency at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a postdoctoral fellowship in infectious diseases at Stanford University Medical Center and a national service commitment in Panama at Middle America Research Unit, National Institutes of Health. He joined U-M as a research associate in 1965, and was appointed assistant professor in 1967, associate professor in 1971, and professor in 1976. He served as chair of U-M’s Department of Population Planning and International Health and Center for Population Planning from 1993-96 and as director of the Bioterrorism Preparedness Initiative from 2002-04. He founded the UM-Israel Public Health Partnership and co-directed the Michigan Center for Respiratory Virus Research and Response. An international expert on pandemic planning and emergency response to respiratory virus outbreaks, he was selected to chair the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee on COVID-19. He is the author of more than 350 research papers.

Jun Ni, Shien-Ming (Sam) Wu Collegiate Professor of Manufacturing Science and professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering, co-director of the Multi-Campus National Science Foundation Center for Intelligent Maintenance Systems, deputy director of the NSF-Engineering Research Center for Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems, and director of the S.M. Wu Manufacturing Research Center, Aug. 31, 2021. Ni received his B.S. in mechanical and production engineering from Shanghai Jiaotong University, China, in 1982 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin in 1984 and 1987, respectively. He was hired as a research fellow at U-M in 1987 and appointed assistant research scientist in 1989. He was appointed associate professor in 1993, and professor in 1997. Ni is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the International Society of Nanomanufacturing. He received the Society of Manufacturing Engineers’ Outstanding Young Manufacturing Award, the Presidential Faculty Fellow Award, and the Institute of International Education’s Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovation in International Education. Ni completed 152 grants and contracts, published more than 300 technical papers and co-authored a textbook titled “Data-Driven Cognitive Manufacturing Applications in Predictive Maintenance and Zero Defect Manufacturing.”He is the inventor or co-inventor of several patents.

Eran Pichersky, Michael M. Martin Collegiate Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology in LSA, Dec. 31, 2021. Pichersky received his B.Sc. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1980 and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis, in 1984. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1986. He was promoted to associate professor in 1992 and to professor in 1998. Pichersky’s research programs have focused on the characterization of genes and proteins that catalyze reactions that are unique to plants. His research has resulted in about 250 publications, four patents, two co-edited collections of research papers and a book, “Plants and Human Conflict,” which details the role plant chemicals have played in the history of warfare. Pichersky’s achievements have been recognized by Guggenheim, von Humboldt and Fulbright fellowships, and election as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science  and of the American Society of Plant Biologists. In addition to his service on numerous university and national committees, he served for two years as chair of the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology when it formed during the reorganization of the former Department of Biology.

Richard L. Prager, Richard and Norma Sarns Research Professor of Cardiac Surgery and professor of cardiac surgery in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2021. Prager received his A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1967 and his M.D. from State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in 1971. He completed his general and thoracic surgery residencies at the University of Michigan in 1976 and 1978, respectively. He began his career as an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University and joined St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor five years later as a cardiac and thoracic surgeon. He joined U-M as a clinical professor in 1999. Prager’s mastery of the role of data and quality improvement led to the formation of the Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Quality Collaborative. He served as the president of the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Prager is one of the founding directors of the Frankel Cardiovascular Center. He led the cardiac surgery transition from a section to a department and served as interim chair from 2018-20. He received the Mark B. Orringer U-M Thoracic Surgery Residency Teaching Award in 2012 and served as the director of the Thoracic Surgery Residency Program.

R. Kevin Reynolds, George W. Morley Collegiate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2021. Reynolds received his B.S. from Stanford University in 1978 and his M.D. from the University of New Mexico’s School of Medicine in 1982. He completed his obstetrics and gynecology residency at the University of Vermont and his gynecologic oncology fellowship at the University of Michigan. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1991, was promoted to associate professor in 1998 and to professor in 2008. He directed the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship Program and was chief of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology from. Reynolds is the author of the “Overview of Gynecologic Oncology”and its 11 editions. He was awarded the Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology’s National Faculty Award for Excellence in Resident Education four times, won the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology’s Silver Speculum Teaching Award three times, and was the Medical School’s Clinician of the Year in 2015. Reynolds has been a member of the Cervical Cancer and Uterine Cancer Treatment Committees of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and served as a member of the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists’ Membership and Government Relations Committees.

Mary C. Ruffolo, Rosemary A. Sarri Collegiate Professor of Social Work and professor of social work in the School of Social Work, Dec. 31, 2021. Ruffolo earned her B.S. in 1978 from the University of Dayton, her M.S.W. in 1979 from the University of Illinois, Champaign, and her Ph.D. in 1988 from The Ohio State University. After serving as a visiting associate professor, she joined the School of Social Work as an associate professor in 1999 and was promoted to professor in 2014. Ruffolo’s research focuses on integrated behavioral health and primary care, the global impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health and wellbeing, organizational factors that influence sustaining evidence-based interventions/programs in community behavioral health settings, adapting efficacious interventions for children and youth experiencing serious mental health challenges and addressing ways to disseminate interventions with at-risk populations. Ruffolo is the PI on the Health Resources and Services Administration behavioral health workforce training grants in the Detroit community and was the PI on three other HRSA workforce training grants. She served as associate dean for educational programs in SSW from 2006-09 and from 2017-19. She also directed the SSW Office of Global Activities and SSW Continuing Education Programs.

Stephen J. Stefanac, clinical professor of dentistry in the School of Dentistry, Dec. 31, 2021. Stefanac received his B.S. in 1976 from the University of Michigan and his D.D.S. in 1980 from the University of Detroit. He received his M.S. in oral diagnosis in 1987 from the U-M School of Dentistry. He served on the faculty of the University of Detroit Mercy’s School of Dentistry and the University of Iowa’s College of Dentistry before joining U-M in 2004 as a clinical professor and associate dean for patient services of the School of Dentistry. He was senior associate dean of the School of Dentistry from 2014-19. Stefanac’s service and research focused on clinical care management, patient outcomes and care of medically compromised patients. He has authored or co-authored many scholarly publications and is a lead author and editor of “Treatment Planning in Dentistry” third edition. At the School of Dentistry, he was the clinical lead for implementing electronic patient records and digital imaging and led the BlueRenew clinic design and equipment selection for a $140 million schoolwide renovation. He is a member of the Pierre Fauchard Academy and the International College of Dentists. Stefanac has received several student-nominated teaching awards throughout his career.

Jeffrey E. Terrell, professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery in the Medical School, Jan. 7, 2022. Terrell received his B.A. from the University of Chicago in 1984 and his M.D. from Harvard University in 1988. He completed an internship in general surgery at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center and a residency in otolaryngology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. He joined the U-M otolaryngology faculty as a lecturer in 1993, was promoted to assistant professor in 1994, to associate professor in 2001 and to professor in 2009. Terrell’s academic career focused on head and neck cancer and rhinologic/sinus surgery. Early on, he held a research investigator position at the Veterans’ Affairs Hospital Health Services Research Division. This led to funding through NIH Specialized Programs of Research Excellence on molecular markers, health behaviors and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer. He was awarded funding to start the Michigan Multidisciplinary Sinus Center. In 2020, he led the development of a multidisciplinary team at Michigan Medicine for the treatment of a rare blood vessel disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Terrell has served in many committee positions within the health system and as associate chief medical information officer since 2012.

Richmond H. Thomason, professor of philosophy and of linguistics in LSA and professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the College of Engineering, Dec. 31, 2021. Thomason received his B.A. from Wesleyan University in 1961, and his M.A. in 1963 and Ph.D. in 1965 from Yale University. He held positions at Yale, the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie-Mellon University before joining U-M in 1999 as a professor of philosophy, computer science and linguistics. Thomason’s central interests are in logic. He has published more than 35 articles and a textbook. Since 2011, he has served as managing editor of the Studia Logica. His concern with adapting logical theories for applications beyond the purely mathematical sciences led to an interest in linguistics. Since 1986, he and his colleagues have worked to develop and apply a theory of inheritance systems. He engaged in a research project in 1994 concerned with the development of architectures for natural language interpretation and generation. At U-M, he renewed his interests in philosophy and started new projects in philosophy of language, the logic of context, the theory of practical reasoning and the formalization of reasoning about the attitudes of other agents.

Priscilla K. Tucker, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and curator of the Museum of Zoology in LSA, Dec. 31, 2021. Tucker received her B.A. from Colgate University in 1974, and her M.S. in 1980 and Ph.D. in 1984 from Texas A&M University. She was a postdoctoral trainee in the Jackson Laboratory and a visiting instructor in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Science at Texas A&M University before joining U-M as an assistant professor and assistant curator of mammals in 1988. She was promoted to associate professor and associate curator in 1995, and to professor and curator of mammals in 2005. She was a senior fellow for the Sweetland Writing Center and the Learning Analytics Workshop. In 2020, she was appointed program director of the National Science Foundation’s Division of Environmental Biology-Evolutionary Processes and served in that role for one year. Tucker is known for her innovative research in evolutionary biology, focusing primarily on the genetics of hybrid zones and evolution of sex chromosomes. Working with collaborators, she focused her attention on a hybrid zone in house mice across Europe, discovering unusual patterns of sex chromosome distribution and evolution. Her research resulted in key contributions to the field of evolutionary biology.

Ralph T. Yang, John B. Feen Distinguished University Professor of Engineering, Dwight F. Benton Professor of Chemical Engineering, and professor of chemical engineering in the College of Engineering, Aug. 31, 2021. Yang earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from the National Taiwan University, and his M.S. in 1968 and his Ph.D. in 1971 in chemical engineering from Yale University. In 1995, he joined U-M’s Department of Chemical Engineering as department chair and professor. He was the department chair until 2000. Yang’s research interests focused on solid surfaces and their new applications. He is a leading expert on gas adsorption. He published the books, “Gas Separation by Adsorption Processes” and “Adsorbents: Fundamentals and Applications.” Yang and his students have published 450 journal papers, and he holds 33 U.S. patents. Yang was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2005, Academia Sinica in 2008 and as a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering in 2015. He has received several awards, including three from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers: the William H. Walker Award for Excellence in Contribution to Chemical Engineering Literature, the Institute Award for Excellence in Industrial Gases Technology and the AIChE Separations Division’s Clarence Gerhold Award.

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