The Board of Regents approved the following items at its Dec. 3 meeting:

Laser lab expansion planned at Gerstacker

A $9.4 million project will expand the Gerald Mourou Center for Ultrafast Optical Science at the Carl A. Gerstacker Building to accommodate a new zettawatt-equivalent ultrashort pulse laser system that is part of a long-term cooperative agreement award from the National Science Foundation. The project will renovate approximately 14,000 gross square feet within Gerstacker for the new laser and approximately 10,000 gross square feet in the Herbert H. Dow Building to accommodate relocation of two materials science and engineering laboratories from Gerstacker to provide space for the new laser. College of Engineering resources will fund the project that is scheduled to be completed in the winter of 2022.

Brighton Center for Specialty Care boiler system to be upgraded

The boiler system at the Michigan Medicine Brighton Center for Specialty Care will be upgraded to increase steam capacity, quality and reliability, alleviating issues with steam demand associated with sterilization and building humidification. Health System resources will fund the $3.2 million project that is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2021.

Academic calendars updated to reflect support for campus well-being 

The University of Michigan has revised its 2020-21 academic calendars for the Ann Arbor, Dearborn and Flint campuses to include two well-being days to provide students a break during the winter 2021, term. The updated academic calendars address the challenges posed by COVID-19. For the Ann Arbor and UM-Flint campuses, well-being breaks will be Feb. 24 and March 23, and Feb. 25-26 at UM-Dearborn. In addition to the well-being days, the Ann Arbor campus has rescheduled its University Honors Convocation, which will take place as a virtual ceremony March 31. Classes also will end one day later, on April 21. The revised academic calendars still ensure that the university adheres to the federal definition of a credit hour. 

Academic building name changed to School of Kinesiology Building

The newly renovated Edward Henry Kraus Building will be called the School of Kinesiology Building, effective immediately. The School of Kinesiology’s faculty, students and staff plan to move into the new space during the winter term. The Kraus Building, constructed in 1915, was named in honor of Edward Henry Kraus, the sixth dean of LSA. The new name reflects relocation of academic units. The building previously housed the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Department of Molecular, Cellular and Development Biology in LSA. Both have moved to the Biological Sciences Building, and the Kraus Building no longer houses any LSA functions. LSA is considering a variety of options for recognizing the Kraus name and legacy in coordination with members of the Kraus family.

V.P. Wilbanks honored as she retires after 25 years

Cynthia H. Wilbanks, U-M’s vice president for government relations for the past 22 years, was recognized with a Board of Regents’ resolution showing “deep appreciation and recognition for her dedication and service” to the university since 1995. Wilbanks, also a U-M graduate, joined the university as associate vice president for university relations in 1995 and was appointed vice president for government relations in 1998. The board resolution said she used her relationship-building and collaborative skills to promote and advance the university in a multitude of ways. Among many accomplishments, she helped create the University Research Corridor with Michigan State University and Wayne State University and helped enhance the university’s presence in Detroit. She retires Dec. 31.

Resolution recognizes Regent Shauna Ryder Diggs

Members of the Board of Regents extended their collective appreciation to Regent Shauna Ryder Diggs with a resolution praising her eight years of exemplary service as a board member. Dec. 3 was her last meeting as a regent. Diggs’ ties to the university began with her matriculation in the Inteflex Program and completion of her internal medicine internship and dermatology residency at Michigan Medicine (formerly the U-M Health System). She is a lifetime member of the U-M Alumni Association and many organizations that support the university and higher education, including her current service as chair of the Association of Governing Boards of Colleges and Universities. The resolution said Diggs’ perspective as a practicing physician was invaluable to her work as chair of the board’s Health Affairs Committee and in her thoughtful advice helping university leaders navigate through a global pandemic. Her Board of Regents colleagues said Diggs showed her deep care for ensuring access and affordability for all students by supporting the Go Blue Guarantee and other programs such as the LEAD Scholars program at the Alumni Association. 

Ann Arbor campus

Named professorships

N.M. Mosharaf Kabir Chowdhury, Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2022.

*Karen B. Farris, Charles R. Walgreen III Professor of Pharmacy Administration, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2025.

*Jeffrey A. Fessler, William L. Root Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, effective March 1, 2021, through Feb. 28, 2026.

*Ronald M. Gilgenbach, Chihiro Kikuchi Collegiate Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2025.

Meredith Morgan, Theodore S. Lawrence, M.D., Ph.D., and Patricia Krause Research Professor of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Brahmajee K. Nallamothu, Stevo Julius Research Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Anna A.S. Schwendeman, William I. Higuchi Collegiate Professor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2025.

*Steven P. Schwendeman, Ara G. Paul Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, and effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2025.

Emily E. Scott, F.F. Blicke Collegiate Professor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2025.

Ananda Sen, Lee A. Green Collegiate Research Professor, Office of the Vice President for Research, effective Nov. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Administrative appointments

*Debra Barton, associate dean for research, School of Nursing, effective Sept. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2024.

*Joseph A. Himle, associate dean for faculty affairs, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2023.

Teri A. Grieb, associate dean for research strategy, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2020.

David C. Miller, president, U-M Health System; and executive vice dean of clinical affairs, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2021.

Mark H. Nornes, interim chair, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021.

Other transactions

Rogério Pinto, change in title to associate dean for research and innovation, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2023.

Matthew B. Soellner, correction of effective dates, William R. Roush Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2023.

Dearborn campus

*Ann Yolanda Lampkin-Williams, dean, College of Education, Health, and Human Services, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021.

*Mitchel A. Sollenberger, associate provost for undergraduate education and student success, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2023.

*Karen S. Strandholm, interim chair, Department of Management Studies, College of Business, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Flint campus

Stephen D. Bernstein, acting chair, Department of English, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021.

Cynthia A. McCurren, dean, School of Nursing, effective March 1, 2021, through Dec. 31, 2025.

Sapna Thwaite, interim dean, School of Education and Human Services, effective Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021.

*Reappointments

Retirements

George C. Alter, research professor, Population Studies Center and Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research in the Institute for Social Research, and professor of history in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Alter received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971 and his Ph.D. in 1978 from the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Master of Arts degree in 1978 from the University of Michigan. Alter was a professor of history and director of the Population Institute for Research and Training at Indiana University before joining U-M as a research professor, professor and associate director of ICPSR in 2007. Alter served as executive director of ICPSR from 2011-16. His research integrated theory and methods from demography, economics and family history with historical sources to understand demographic behaviors in the past. His book “Family and the Female Life Course” was one of the first applications of event history analysis to historical data, and he was a founder of the Eurasia Project on Population and Family History. Alter was also known for work on historical trends in fertility, stature and morbidity. He was the president of the Social Science History Association in 2011.

Daniel W. Berland, clinical associate professor of internal medicine and clinical associate professor of anesthesiology in the Medical School, Dec. 30, 2020. Berland received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1977 from the University of Michigan and his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1980 from The Ohio State University. He completed his postgraduate training in internal medicine at the Henry Ford Health System. He worked for one year at the former Michael Reese Medical Center in Chicago before joining the University of Chicago internal medicine faculty, where he remained as associate clinical professor until 1996. From 1996-2003, Berland was a faculty member at Mount Sinai Hospital and the Chicago Medical School, and then worked for the Advocate system. He joined U-M as a clinical assistant professor in 2006 and was promoted to clinical associate professor in 2017. He attended on inpatient service and in clinics, was a leader in the development of online order entry at Michigan Medicine, completed board certification in addiction medicine, and joined the Department of Anesthesiology as key faculty in the Back and Pain Clinic. He published several papers and has been the principle investigator on two significant grants, including an AHRQ grant that is funded through August 2023.

Lawrence F. Bielak, associate research scientist, epidemiology in the School of Public Health, Dec. 31, 2020. Bielak received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1972 from Wayne State University, and his Doctor of Dental Surgery and Master of Public Health degrees from the University of Michigan in 1976 and 1993, respectively. He joined U-M as a graduate student instructor and visiting research investigator in 1993. He was promoted to research investigator in 1994, to assistant research scientist in 2003 and to associate research scientist in 2013. He served as an adjunct lecturer in 1995. Bielak’s research explored the epidemiology and genetics of atherosclerosis. He was involved in international collaborations investigating genetic determinants of cardiometabolic risk factors and target organ damage to the heart and liver. These efforts included the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine Program. Bielak was among the first researchers to investigate the epidemiology of coronary artery calcification, and he developed methods to establish guidelines for the interpretation of computed tomography scans of arterial calcification. He was an affiliate of the Center for Midlife Science. Additionally, he investigated the association of prenatal exposures to toxic heavy metals with birth outcomes and the infant gut microbiota. His work resulted in more than 120 published articles.

John C. Burkhardt, clinical professor of education in the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education in the School of Education, Dec. 31, 2020. Burkhardt received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1972 from Oakland University and a Master of Arts degree in 1974 from Michigan State University. He earned a Master of Arts degree and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1985 and 1986, respectively. From 1993-2000, he served as the program director for leadership and higher education at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. He joined U-M as a clinical professor and director of the National Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good in 2000. He also was director of the National Center for Institutional Diversity from 2013-16. Burkhardt’s scholarship advanced his field’s knowledge of leadership and transformation, organizational culture and the role of philanthropy in U.S. society and higher education. He published four co-edited books during his career at U-M, including “Inspiration for Servant Leaders: Lessons from Fifty Years of Research and Practice.” He received the National Leadership Award for Outstanding Support of Hispanic Issues from the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education in 2019. He was a senior policy adviser on the Governor’s Commission on Higher Education and Michigan’s Future and was a member of the Michigan House of Representatives Blue Ribbon Panel on Higher Education as a Public Good.

Ming Chen, clinical associate professor of pediatrics in the Medical School, Dec. 30, 2020. Chen received his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1983 from the Beijing Medical College, his Master of Science degree in 1986 from the Beijing Medical University and his Ph.D. in 1992 from the University of Heidelberg. He completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada, followed by a residency from the State University of New York – Health Science Center at Brooklyn, New York, and a clinical fellowship in pediatric endocrinology from New York Hospital Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He joined U-M as a clinical assistant professor in 2003 and was promoted to clinical associate professor in 2013. Chen’s contributions have included expanding clinical programs to include the complex and challenging population of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and establishing the Michigan Center for CAH. Chen served on the Michigan Interdisciplinary Committee on Disorders of Sex Development, the Steering Committee of the Michigan Interdisciplinary Committee on DSD and the Michigan Multidisciplinary Committee on Thyroid Eye Diseases. Within the Department of Pediatrics, Chen was associate director of the Pediatric Endocrinology Fellowship Program from 2004-16. He has 17 peer-reviewed publications, four book chapters and one U.S. patent.

Paul Conway, associate professor of information in the School of Information, Dec. 31, 2020. Conway received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Indiana University, and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1980 and 1991, respectively. Prior to joining U-M as an associate professor in 2006, Conway held leadership positions in several academic libraries, including director of Information Technology Services at Duke University and head of the Preservation Department at Yale University. Conway was known for his expertise in the preservation of cultural materials, particularly in the area of digitization. He was involved in standards-setting activities around digitization, and was one of the first to research their efficacy. His research explored the quality assessment in digital surrogates and digitization error and its consequences in the HathiTrust. He worked with Ann Arbor’s The Ark music venue organizing, preserving and digitizing recorded sound music from several decades, and worked with the Leo Sarkisian Collection “Music Time in Africa” broadcast on Voice of America. The Sarkisian collection contains unique recordings documenting sub-Saharan African music traditions that are endangered, or now lost.

Constance J. Creech, interim dean and professor of nursing in the UM-Flint School of Nursing, Feb. 1, 2021. Creech received her diploma in nursing in 1977 from Hurley Medical Center School of Nursing, her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in 1980 from UM-Flint, and her Master of Science in Nursing and Doctor of Education degrees from Wayne State University in 1987 and 2005, respectively. She was an adjunct clinical preceptor in the Ann Arbor campus’ School of Nursing from 1990-94. Creech joined UM-Flint as an adjunct lecturer in 1995. She was promoted to lecturer in 1999, to assistant professor in 2006, to associate professor in 2012 and to professor in 2018. Creech was director of the Graduate Nursing Programs in the School of Health Professions and Studies from 2005-17, and director of Graduate Nursing Affairs in the UM-Flint School of Nursing from 2017-20. She was appointed interim dean of the UM-Flint School of Nursing in 2020. As director of graduate nursing programs, Creech established the nationally accredited doctor of nursing practice programs to prepare primary and acute care adult-gerontology, psychiatric mental health and family nurse practitioners. She also established Master of Science nursing concentrations to prepare nurse leaders in management, administration and nursing education. Her scholarship in workforce diversity and delivery of culturally competent care for underserved populations provided a frequently emulated model for graduate nursing education.

Catherine A. Davy, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, and professor of English, and of women’s and gender studies in the College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, UM-Dearborn, Dec. 31, 2020. Davy received her Bachelor of Arts degree in speech and drama in 1971 from Clarke College. She earned a Master of Arts degree and Ph.D., both in drama and performance studies, from New York University in 1975 and 1979, respectively. Before being appointed provost and professor at UM-Dearborn in 2009, Davy held administrative and teaching positions at Bentley University, Adelphi University, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of California, Irvine. As provost, she led a successful reaccreditation effort, implemented a revision of the Dearborn campus general education curriculum, created a new College of Health and Human Services, established a campuswide advising office, and launched innovative programs such as the Talent Gateway. She was named the recipient of the 2015 Leader of Change Award by the Network for Change and Continuous Innovation in Higher Education. Davy’s seminal work, “Lady Dicks and Lesbian Brothers: Staging the Unimaginable at the WOW Café Theater,” explores the history and impact of the WOW Café Theater in New York. She has served on the board of directors for First Step, a women’s shelter in Detroit, Starfish Family Services and New Center Community Services.

Raymond G. De Vries, professor of learning health sciences, and of obstetrics and gynecology in the Medical School, and professor of sociology in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. De Vries received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1973 from Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California, and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis in 1978 and 1981, respectively. He became an assistant professor at Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts, and then moved in 1983 to Westmont College, where he was promoted to associate professor and named chair of the Department of Sociology in 1986. He went to St. Olaf College where he was promoted to full professor in 1993 and chaired the Department of Sociology and Anthropology from 1993-96. De Vries joined U-M as an associate professor in 2006 and was promoted to professor in 2008. He assumed the co-director position of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine in 2013, and was named associate director in 2016. De Vries was a visiting professor at the CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care at Maastricht University in The Netherlands from 2010-20. His research focused on the comparative study of health care and maternity care systems and the sociology of bioethics, with a particular concentration on research ethics and the integrity of research. He published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. 

Nancy K. Florida, professor of Indonesian languages and literatures in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Florida received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Connecticut College and her Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1982 and 1990, respectively. She joined U-M as a lecturer in 1987 and was appointed an instructor in 1989. She was promoted to assistant professor in 1990, to associate professor in 1995 and to professor in 2003. At U-M, Florida gained international renown as a scholar of Indonesian and Javanese literature. Her first book, “Writing the Past, Inscribing the Future: History as Prophecy in Colonial Java,” was awarded the Harry J. Benda Prize, the Association of Asian Studies’ prize for the best new book on Southeast Asia. She was also respected for her three-volume “Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts.” Her contributions to the field of Indonesian studies earned her numerous awards from the government of Indonesia, including a royal title in 1999. Florida served as associate chair and chair of the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures and as director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies and the Islamic Studies Program. She also was appointed as a senior fellow of the Michigan Society of Fellows.

Thomas E. Fricke, professor of anthropology in LSA, and research professor in the Survey Research Center and Population Studies Center, Institute for Social Research, Dec. 31, 2020. Fricke received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1977 from Moorhead State University in Minnesota and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1978 and 1984, respectively. He was a research fellow at the East-West Population Institute from 1984-85. He joined U-M as an assistant research scientist and adjunct assistant professor in 1985. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1986, to associate professor in 1993 and to professor in 2003. He was named research professor in ISR in 2003. Fricke was involved in the 1980s renewal of anthropological demography. His contributions to this area have been methodological in merging survey and ethnographic approaches to field research; theoretical in developing cultural and political models for studying demographic shifts; and empirical in the longitudinal study of social cultural transformation in a remote Nepali village across 39 years. The results of his research appear in journals, edited volumes and book-length publications such as “Himalayan Households: Tamang Demography and Domestic Processes” and the co-edited volume “Anthropological Demography: Toward a New Synthesis.” Fricke chaired the Department of Anthropology from 2009-15.

Brenda K. Gunderson, lecturer IV in statistics in LSA, June 30, 2020. Gunderson received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1984 from St. Olaf College, her Master of Science degree in 1986 from Iowa State University and her Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Michigan. She joined U-M in 1989 and was appointed lecturer II in the Department of Statistics in 1993. She was promoted to lecturer IV in 2005 and was appointed senior lecturer in 2002. Gunderson’s research focused on statistical education and the use of technology to enhance teaching and learning. She was a leader in the integration of instructional technologies into the undergraduate statistics curriculum. She also led the statistics department’s training of GSIs and served on various committees, including the Foundational Course Initiative Faculty Board, the Academic Innovation Advisory Committee and the Provost Task Force on a Michigan Undergraduate Education in the Third Century. Gunderson received the Golden Apple Award, multiple LSA Excellence in Education Awards, the LSA Mentorship Service Award, the U-M Teaching Innovation Prize and the Council for Disability Concerns Certificate of Appreciation.

Christopher Kendall, professor of music in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, Dec. 31, 2020. Kendall received his Bachelor of Music degree in 1972 from Antioch College and his Master of Music degree in orchestral conducting in 1974 from the University of Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of Music. Kendall joined U-M as a professor of music and dean of SMTD in 2005. As dean from 2005-15, Kendall was instrumental in establishing the Gershwin critical edition project and the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti El Sistema program; securing funding and leading the design process for the expansion and renovation of the Earl V. Moore building; and launching a fundraising campaign to build scholarship resources for students. He also helped initiate U-M’s Arts Engine and the National Alliance for the Arts at Research Universities. Prior to joining U-M, Kendall directed the School of Music at the University of Maryland, the Music Division and Tanglewood Institute of the Boston University School of the Arts, and was artistic director of the arts production company Millennium Inc. He was a conductor and artistic director of the 21st Century Consort, ensemble-in-residence at the Smithsonian Institution, and founded the Folger Consort, early music-in-residence at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. His awards include the Emmy, Smithson and Washington Area Music (Wammie) Awards with the 20th Century Consort; the Woolson Award; and Wammie Awards with the Folger Consort.

John Yoshihisa Kuwada, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Kuwada received his Bachelor of Science degree from Case Western Reserve University in 1970 and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1980. He performed postdoctoral research at the University of California, San Diego and Stanford University. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1987, was promoted to associate professor in 1992 and to professor in 1999. Kuwada served in various administrative capacities, was the director of Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies and helped form the neuroscience major. In 2012, he co-founded Biology Education in Cambodia, which trains faculty and students at the Royal University of Phnom Penh. Kuwada’s research used genetic model animals to study the nervous system. His lab was one of the earliest to adopt zebrafish to study biological processes, and his experiments helped establish that neurons form connections using specific molecular cues in vertebrate embryos. The lab also used a genetic approach to identify genes important for the development and function of the nervous system. Kuwada received the March of Dimes’ Basil O’Connor Scholar Award, the LSA Excellence in Education Award and the Japan Science and Technology Agency Senior Fellowship.

Rita Karen Loch-Caruso, professor of toxicology in the School of Public Health, and professor of Program in the Environment in the School for Environment and Sustainability, Dec. 31, 2020. Loch-Caruso received Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees in 1976 and a Ph.D. in 1982, all from the University of Cincinnati. She joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1986. She was promoted to associate professor in 1993 and to professor in 2001. She directed the Toxicology Program from 1999-2012 and was interim chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences from 2004-05. Loch-Caruso was an expert in reproductive and developmental toxicology. She began her research career working on lead neurodevelopmental toxicity, contributing to the early understanding of lead’s effects on brain and behavior. As a postdoctoral fellow, she became interested in toxicant impacts on labor and delivery. Her subsequent work expanded the understanding of toxicant actions on the placenta as a mechanism underlying adverse birth outcomes. She led numerous research projects funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. From 2011-19, she directed the Michigan Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease Center. She also directed a highly productive training grant from NIEHS from 1999-2018, overseeing the training of scores of other predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees. She received the Society of Toxicology’s Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award.

Janine R. Maddock, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Maddock received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1980 from the University of California, Davis, her Master of Science degree in 1983 from San Diego State University and her Ph.D. in 1990 from Carnegie Mellon University. She was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. She joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1995. She was promoted to associate professor in 2001 and to professor in 2009. Maddock served as associate chair in the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology in 2004 and from 2008-09. She also served on the LSA Executive Committee from 2015-18. Maddock designed and taught numerous courses for graduate students and undergraduates, especially in the fields of molecular biology and microbiology. She chaired the Graduate Admissions Committee from 2009-10 and the Graduate Studies Committee from 2005-07. In addition, she served on scientific review panels, was chair for Division J of the American Society for Microbiology in 2002 and was on key editorial boards in the field of microbiology. Her research focused on delineating how the macromolecular machines that make proteins, called ribosomes, assemble. A second line of research focused on how proteins are positioned within cells. Maddock published more than 50 scientific papers and reviews. She received the Imes and Moore Faculty Award and three LSA Excellence in Education awards. 

Tomoko Masuzawa, professor of comparative literature and professor of history in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Masuzawa received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from the International Christian University, Tokyo, her Master of Arts degree in 1979 from Yale University and her Ph.D. in 1985 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She joined U-M as an associate professor in 1999 and was promoted to professor in 2005. Masuzawa was a pre-eminent scholar in religious studies, specializing in 19th-century discourses on religion, critical theory and hermeneutics, and history of the human sciences. She authored “In Search of Dreamtime: The Quest for the Origin of Religion” and “The Invention of World Religions: Or, How European Universalism Was Preserved in the Language of Pluralism.” Masuzawa received U-M’s Humanities Award in 2000. She was awarded fellowships by the Guggenheim Foundation and by the School of Social Science at the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study. She also received the Association of American Publishers’ 2005 Award for Excellence in Professional and Academic Publishing. From 2005-08, she was president of the North American Association for the Study of Religion, and was a member of the American Academy of Religion.

Henry I. Mosberg, Tom D. Rowe Collegiate Professor of Pharmacy and professor of medicinal chemistry in the College of Pharmacy, Jan. 31, 2021. Mosberg received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1971 from the University of Illinois, Chicago, and his Ph.D. in 1976 from the University of Illinois, Urbana. He was a research assistant professor at the University of Arizona before joining U-M as an assistant professor in 1983. He was promoted to associate professor in 1988 and to professor in 1995. He served as associate dean for research and graduate education from 1999-2011 and as senior associate dean from 2011-12. Mosberg was a leader in medicinal chemistry and drug design, as evidenced by his election as a fellow in both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. His research focused primarily on molecular recognition between small- to medium-size ligands, such as peptides, and their macromolecular targets. He was a member of the university’s Substance Abuse Research Center and served as the director of the college’s Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Core from 2000-20. He was instrumental in the establishment of the Vahlteich Medicinal Chemistry Core, a key component of Michigan Drug Discovery, and was selected as the college’s first associate dean for research and graduate education.

Knute J. Nadelhoffer, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Nadelhoffer received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1972 from Carroll College and his Bachelor of Science in Education degree and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1977 and 1983, respectively. He joined the University of Chicago’s Marine Biological Laboratory Ecosystems Center as a postdoctoral fellow and was promoted to senior scientist in 1999. Nadelhoffer served as program director of the National Science Foundation’s Ecosystems Studies Program from 2002-03. He joined U-M in 2002 as the director of the university’s Biological Station and was appointed a professor in 2003. He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2019 and a fellow of the Ecological Society of America in 2020. Nadelhoffer was internationally recognized for his work in ecosystem ecology. He was a world authority on the cycling of nitrogen in ecological systems and the consequences of human activity for nitrogen pollution. He published more than 150 research papers and provided his expertise in testimony to Congress and to international panels. He transformed the research, education and outreach of the Biological Station, expanding the diversity of courses offered and the diversity of students who participate in them.

Helene Neu, lecturer IV in French and director of the Elementary French Program in LSA, May 31, 2013. Neu received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1970 and a Master of Arts degree in 1972 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She joined U-M as a lecturer I in 1976. She was promoted to senior lecturer in 1982, to lecturer III in 1992 and to lecturer IV in 2005. She was named a Regents’ Lecturer in 1988. Neu taught each of the courses within the French language program, as well as courses in teaching and learning romance languages. She developed a popular course in French phonetics that gave students the opportunity to apply theory to practice, improve their own pronunciation and learn how to teach others. As coordinator of first-year French, then as director of the elementary French program, she oversaw the professional development of many graduate students and lecturers as teachers. Neu led the transition from a grammar- and drill-based language program to one that is built around development of communicative skills, group interaction, critical thinking and a process approach to writing. Neu co-authored “Parle-moi un peu! Information Gap Activities for Beginning French Classes” and several other books on English grammar for French and Spanish students. She received LSA’s Excellence in Education Award.

Martin S. Pernick, professor of history in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Pernick received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968 from Brandeis University and his Ph.D. in 1979 from Columbia University. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1979. He was promoted to associate professor in 1985 and to professor in 1992. Pernick studied the history of medicine, primarily writing about the history of medicine in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries, especially the history of disease and disability, the meaning and control of pain, gender and medicine, the ethics of medical practice, and the role of health care professionals in society. He was a leader in the Inteflex Medical Program and the author of many scholarly articles and book chapters. He wrote the “The Black Stork: Eugenics and the Death of ‘Defective’ Babies in American Medicine and Motion Pictures since 1915” and “A Calculus of Suffering: Pain, Professionalism, and Anesthesia in Nineteenth-Century America.” Pernick played a major role in leadership within the Department of History and was active in the leadership of national history of medicine organizations, including serving as president of the Sigerist Circle. He received the university’s Matthews Underclass Teaching Award.

Stephen C. Rand, professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the College of Engineering, and professor of applied physics in the Department of Physics in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Rand received his Bachelor of Science degree from McMaster University in 1972 and his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1974 and 1978, respectively. Rand held positions at the IBM Research Laboratory as a World Trade Postdoctoral Fellow, as a research associate in the Department of Physics at Stanford University and as a member of the technical staff at Hughes Research Laboratory. He joined U-M as an associate professor in 1987 and was promoted to professor in 1996. Rand conducted research that was explored interactions between light and matter. He invented the diamond laser and reported ultrafast, laser-induced radiant magnetism. His group’s recent work addressed optical magnetism and laser cooling of solids, and led to the establishment of U-M’s Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics, of which Rand served as founding director from 2014-20. Rand published more than 135 papers and was granted 18 patents. He authored “Lectures on Light: Nonlinear and Quantum Optics using the Density Matrix.” In addition, Rand was an editor of the Journal of the Optical Society of America. He was named a Senior Fulbright Scholar and an Erskine Fellow, and served as general chair of the 16th International Conference on Luminescence. He was a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Institute of Physics and the Optical Society of America.

Raymond A. Silverman, professor of history of art, and of Afroamerican and African studies in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Silverman received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1977 and 1983, respectively. After teaching at Michigan State University, Silverman joined U-M as professor in 2002. He was the founding director of the Museum Studies Program from 2002-12, interim co-director of the Museum of Art from 2009-10 and an adjunct curator of African art at the museum from 2010-18. As director of GalleryDAAS from 2013-16, he brought international recognition to one of the few university galleries in the United States dedicated to the arts of Africa and its diasporas. Silverman’s research addressed transcultural exchange; the histories of metal technologies and commodification of culture in Ghana and Ethiopia; the contemporary visual cultures of religion in Ethiopia; and the history of museum representations of Africa and Africans. His publications include “Painting Ethiopia: The Life and Work of Qes Adamu Tesfaw” and “Ethiopia: Traditions of Creativity.” Silverman served on editorial boards and advisory councils for many African arts institutions and was the founding president of the Ghana Studies Association from 1988-92. His proudest achievement is Nkwantananso, the first cultural center in Techiman State, Ghana.

Richard O. Straub, professor of psychology in the College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, UM-Dearborn, Dec. 31, 2020. Straub received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1975 from Florida Southern College and his Master of Arts degree in 1976, a Master of Philosophy degree in 1978 and his Ph.D. in 1979 from Columbia University. He joined UM-Dearborn as an assistant professor in 1979. He was promoted to associate professor in 1984 and to professor in 1994. Straub received UM-Dearborn’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 1982 and was selected as Faculty Member of the Year by the UM-Dearborn Alumni Society in 2006. He and renowned psychologist J.E. Singer were awarded a National Institutes of Health research grant to study “Bio-behavioral Investigations Using Type A and B Animals,” which led to the development of an animal model of Type A behavior. Straub is the sole author of the seminal textbook in the field, “Health Psychology.” He began the first of five three-year terms as chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences in 1992. He was also the founder and first director of the M.S. Program in Health Psychology and served as associate provost at UM-Dearborn from 2007-08. In 1991-92, he chaired the Academic Affairs Advisory Council and co-chaired the Joint Committee on Faculty Governance that created a new faculty governance structure at UM-Dearborn.

Marita G. Titler, professor of nursing in the School of Nursing, Dec. 31, 2020. Titler received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1974 from Mount Mercy College and her Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1978 and 1992, respectively. Titler joined U-M as the Rhetaugh Graves Dumas Professor of Nursing, professor of nursing and associate dean for practice and clinical scholarship in 2009. She was department chair in the School of Nursing from 2011-18 and associate director in the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research from 2009-14. Titler’s focus was on implementation science and outcomes effectiveness research with an emphasis in older adults. She has more than 200 publications in referred journals and was on the National Advisory Council for AHRQ and the Committee on Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Institute of Medicine. She was a member of the NCI Symptom Management and Health-related Quality of Life Steering Committee and the NCI Central IRB for Cancer Prevention and Control. She received the American Organization of Nurse Executives’ National Researcher Award, the Sigma Theta Tau International’s Elizabeth McWilliams Miller Award for Excellence in Research and the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research’s President’s Award. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and member of the National Academy of Medicine. 

Susan E. Waltz, professor of public policy in the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Dec. 31, 2020. Waltz received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1973 from Oklahoma Baptist University and her Ph.D. in 1980 from the University of Denver. From 1984-2000, she was on the faculty at Florida International University in the Department of International Relations. She joined U-M as a professor in 2001. Waltz was an expert in human rights and international affairs, with a focus on arms transfer policy and regional expertise on North Africa.She authored “Human Rights and Reform: Changing the Face of North African Politics” and a series of articles on the historical origins of international human rights instruments.Waltz created the Human Rights Advocacy and the History of International Human Rights Standards website, which serves as a portal for people interested in the advocacy work of the international human rights movement. She served on the national boards of the American Friends Service Committee, Amnesty International USA, and on the executive committee overseeing the work of the Quaker United Nations Office in New York.Waltz developed and co-led an international study opportunity to Costa Rica for Ford School undergraduate students. She won the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies’ Master’s Mentoring Award. 

Wang Zheng, professor of women’s and gender studies, and of history in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Wang Zheng earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis in 1995. She arrived at U-M in 2002 as a faculty associate in the Center for Chinese Studies, was promoted to associate professor of women’s and gender studies with tenure in 2005 and held a courtesy appointment in history since 2008. She was promoted to professor of women’s and gender studies and history in 2016. Wang Zheng is a leading scholar in Chinese women’s studies and institution building. Through two influential books, “Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories” and “Finding Women in the State: A Socialist Feminist Revolution in the People’s Republic of China, 1949-1964,” and essays appearing in the feminist studies journals in the U.S. and China, she has recovered, reanimated and rehistoricized the lives and achievements of Chinese women activists and leaders for gender equality and gendered agency across the 20th century. Wang Zheng has been instrumental in advancing the study of gender in China. With faculty training grants funded by the Ford and Henry Luce Foundations, she transformed the lives of feminist scholars who have taught the graduate program offered by the UM-Fudan Joint Institute for Gender Studies that she founded and directed at Fudan University in Shanghai.

David J. Winter, professor of mathematics in LSA, Dec. 31, 2020. Winter received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1961 from Antioch College and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Yale University in 1963 and 1965, respectively. After receiving his doctorate, he was an instructor at Yale University, a National Science Foundation lecturer at Bowdoin College and an NSF postdoctoral fellow at the Universität Bonn. Winter joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1968. He was promoted to associate professor in 1969 and to professor in 1974. He also served as a visiting faculty member at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Chicago. Winter’s research is primarily in algebra, where ongoing research areas include Lie algebras, algebraic groups, birings, Galois theory of fields and rings (commutative and noncommutative), and foundations of mathematics. Winter published 55 articles in leading scholarly journals. He also authored three books and coauthored two books in the areas of Lie algebras, structure of fields, matrix theory and linear algebra. He had long-standing assignments as the Master’s Committee chair and as faculty secretary. He served as associate chair of graduate studies in 1984-85.

Edward T. Zellers, professor of environmental health sciences in the School of Public Health, Dec. 31, 2020. Zellers received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1978 from Rutgers University and his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1984 and 1987, respectively. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1987. He was promoted to associate professor in 1994 and to professor in 2002. As director of the Industrial Hygiene Program in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences since 1999, Zellers led that program through three ABET accreditation renewals and four competitive NIOSH center grant renewals. From 2000-16, he served as group leader of environmental sensing in the Center for Wireless Integrated MicroSensing and Systems in the College of Engineering. He was a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene and Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, and initiated or participated in numerous global occupational health efforts. In 2010, he received the SPH Teacher of the Year Award and (with colleagues) the CoE Ted Kennedy Family Team Excellence Award. Zellers was an internationally recognized expert in micro-electro-mechanical systems technologies applied to the analysis of organic vapor mixtures. Most of his work in this domain has concerned gas chromatographic microsystems comprising microfabricated devices for vapor preconcentration, separation and detection. 

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