September 27, 2020

marijuana

  1. September 15, 2020

    Dramatic increases in vaping marijuana, nicotine among young adults

    Vaping marijuana and vaping nicotine have increased dramatically among 19- to 22-year-olds, both more than doubling between 2017 and 2019, according to U-M’s annual national Monitoring the Future Panel Study.

  2. September 5, 2019

    Marijuana use among U.S. college students hits 35-year high

    College students’ use of marijuana in 2018 was at the highest level seen in the past three-and-a-half decades, according to findings in U-M’s annual national Monitoring the Future study.

  3. November 8, 2018

    What Proposal 1’s passage means for U-M employees

    Tuesday’s vote to legalize recreational marijuana use by adults will not change U-M policy or federal law, both of which prohibit the drug’s possession and use on university premises.

  4. September 5, 2018

    Marijuana use among U.S. college students remains at three-decade high

    College students’ use of marijuana was at the highest levels seen in the past three decades in 2016, and that trend remained true in 2017, the annual national Monitoring the Future Panel Study shows.

  5. September 8, 2017

    Marijuana use among college students at highest level in 30 years

    Marijuana use among U.S. college students in 2016 was at the highest level seen in the past three decades, according to the most recent Monitoring the Future follow-up study.

  6. April 20, 2017

    First-time marijuana use in college at highest level in three decades

    Levels of first-time marijuana use in college have increased sharply in the past three years to the highest levels recorded in the past three decades, U-M researchers have found.

  7. December 13, 2016

    Teen use of illicit drugs besides marijuana at new low; same for alcohol

    Teenagers’ use of drugs, alcohol and tobacco declined significantly in 2016 at rates that are at their lowest since the 1990s, a new national study by U-M shows.

  8. March 24, 2016

    Medical marijuana reduces use of opioid pain medications

    Patients using medical marijuana to control chronic pain reported a 64 percent reduction in their use of more traditional prescription pain medications known as opioids, a U-M study finds.