University of Michigan
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April 20, 2019

Victors for Michigan final results show $5.28 billion total

February 5, 2019

Victors for Michigan final results show $5.28 billion total

Topic: Campus News

The University of Michigan has released the final results of its Victors for Michigan campaign, which closed Dec. 31, 2018, with more than 398,000 donors giving 2.4 million gifts over seven and a half years, totaling $5.28 billion.

In October 2018, the university became the first public university to raise more than $5 billion in the most successful fundraising campaign in its history.

The gift total includes:

• $1.22 billion for student support, enabling U-M to expand opportunities and enrich the educational experience for all students, regardless of background.

• $1.71 billion for innovative programs in areas such as engaged learning, patient care, music, arts, libraries and more.

• $1.47 billion for distinguished faculty and research across all 19 schools and colleges, UM-Dearborn and UM-Flint.

• $676 million for world-class facilities, including research laboratories, student housing, classrooms, music and arts venues, athletics and recreation.

Of nearly 400,000 donors:

• 94 percent gave less than $5,000.

• Almost half made their very first gift to Michigan in this campaign.

• 55 percent did not attend U-M.

• 11,948 students gave nearly $2.49 million.

• 22,740 faculty, staff and retirees gave more than $201 million.

• A network of 1,655 volunteer donors around the world helped expand the cause.

The funds raised span all of Ann Arbor's 19 schools and colleges, UM-Dearborn and UM-Flint.

“I am grateful for the leadership of my predecessor, Jerry May, the vision and support of presidents Mary Sue Coleman and Mark Schlissel, the deans, directors and regents who championed this campaign along the way, and the dedication of the U-M development team,” said Tom Baird, vice president for development.

“Most importantly, we could not have achieved this without the tireless efforts of more than 1,600 volunteers around the world. It took nearly 400,000 of us working together to get here, and it’s a moment worth celebrating.”

(Editor’s note: This article has been updated from a previous version.)