University of Michigan
News for faculty, staff and retirees

June 20, 2019

Regents Roundup — May 2019

May 16, 2019

Regents Roundup — May 2019

The Board of Regents approved the following items at its meeting Thursday.

Catherine Street infrastructure improvements planned

Work along Catherine Street east of Glen Avenue is planned that includes a partial water main replacement, a new electrical duct bank, refurbishment of a portion of the utility tunnel, sidewalk replacement, lighting improvements, and site restoration. University Utilities resources will fund the $3.8 million project that is scheduled to be completed next spring.

Academic calendar for 2021-22 for Ann Arbor, Dearborn campuses

The 2021-22 academic year for the U-M Ann Arbor campus will start Aug. 30, before the Labor Day holiday, and end with spring commencement April 30. UM-Dearborn will start Sept. 1 and end with spring commencement May 1. The two calendars were developed following the university’s well-established academic calendar guidelines. The Ann Arbor fall term has 69 days and will end Dec. 10. The winter term has 69 days and will start Jan. 5. A pre-Labor Day start allows for a one-week break between the end of the summer term and the start of the fall term. It also provides two full weeks between fall and winter. UM-Dearborn fall term has 67 days and will end Dec. 10. The winter term has 69 days and will start Jan. 10. There will be a Thanksgiving week break in lieu of the fall study break. There are no conflicts with religious holidays for both calendars.

Improvements planned for Michigan HomeMed Pharmacy

A $4.2 million project will improve the layout and operations within the Michigan HomeMed Pharmacy at Eisenhower Corporate Park West. The project was spurred by recent changes in United States Pharmacopeia standards. Architectural, electrical and mechanical work is necessary to accomplish these improvements. Funding for the project will be provided by Health System resources, and construction is scheduled to be completed in the spring of 2020.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

Albert H. Choi, professor of law, Law School, effective Sept. 1, 2019.

Lindred L. Greer, associate professor of management and organizations, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Sept. 1, 2019.

Christopher I. Rider, associate professor of strategy, Ross School, effective Sept. 1, 2019.

Named professorships

*Rajeev Batra, Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing, Ross School, effective June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2024.

*John M. Carethers, John G. Searle Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School, effective July 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

*James E. Carpenter, Harold W. and Helen L. Gehring Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2020.

Hope K. Haefner, Harold A. Furlong Professor of Women’s Health, Medical School, effective May 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

*Ronald G. Larson, George Granger Brown Professor of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

*Theodore S. Lawrence, Isadore Lampe Collegiate Professor of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, effective July 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

*Harry L.T. Mobley, Frederick G. Novy Collegiate Professor of Microbiology, Medical School, effective July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020.

Venkatesh L. Murthy, Melvyn Rubenfire Professor of Preventive Cardiology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

*Valerie P. Opipari, Ravitz Foundation Endowed Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2020.

*Stephen W. Ragsdale, David Ballou Collegiate Professor, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

Yi Sun, Theodore S. Lawrence, M.D., Ph.D. and Patricia Krause Research Professor of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

*Marita G. Titler, Rhetaugh Graves Dumas Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, effective June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2020.

*Kevin K. Tremper, Robert B. Sweet Professor of Anesthesiology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2020.

*David O. Ulrich, Rensis Likert Collegiate Professor of Business Administration, Ross School, effective May 1, 2019 through April 30, 2024.

*James P. Walsh, Gerald and Esther Carey Professor of Business Administration, Ross School, effective June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2024.

Brent B. Ward, Chalmers J. Lyons Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, effective June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2024.

Herbert G. Winful, Joseph E. and Anne P. Rowe Professor of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, effective June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2024.

*Guohua Xi, Richard C. Schneider Research Professor of Neurosurgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

*Donald R. Zak, Burton V. Barnes Collegiate Professor, School for Environment and Sustainability, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

Administrative appointments

Michelle S. Caird, interim chair, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School, effective May 1, 2019.

**Rebecca Cunningham, interim vice president for research, UM Office of Research, effective June 1, 2019.

Justin B. Dimick, chair, Department of Surgery, Medical School, effective June 1, 2019.

**Diane C. Hoelscher, interim associate dean for academic affairs, School of Dentistry, effective June 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020.

Mika LaVaque-Manty, director, Honors Program, LSA, effective July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2022.

*Amit Misra, chair, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2022.

Michael W. Mulholland, senior associate dean of clinical affairs, Medical School, effective June 1, 2019.

Dearborn campus

*Susan A. Everett, chair, Department of Education, College of Education, Health and Human Services, effective July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020.

Yi Lu Murphey, interim vice provost for research, effective May 1, 2019.

Joan C. Remski, chair, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, effective July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2022.

*Reappointments

**Interim approval granted

Retirements

Robert Axelrod, William D. Hamilton Distinguished University Professor, Mary Ann and Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. Professor for the Study of Human Understanding, and professor of political science, LSA; and professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, May 31, 2019. Axelrod received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Chicago in 1964 and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Yale University in 1966 and 1969, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1974. Axelrod was best known for his interdisciplinary work on the evolution of cooperation. His research interests included international security and sense-making. He consulted and lectured on promoting cooperation and harnessing complexity for the United Nations, the World Bank and the U.S. Department of Defense. Axelrod was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1985, and received several awards and fellowships, including the National Medal of Science.

Robert E. Blatz, Jr., professor of taxation in the UM-Dearborn College of Business, Dec. 31, 2018. Blatz received his Bachelor of Arts degree and law degree from the University of Detroit in 1970 and 1973, respectively. He earned his Master of Business Administration degree and a Master of Science degree from the University of Cincinnati in 1980 and 1981, respectively. He received his LL.M. degree in 1991 from New York University, and joined the UM-Dearborn faculty in 2005. Blatz’s teaching and research interests focused on the taxation of business entities, such as corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies. His work also studied the taxation of property transactions, including topics such as the realization and characterization of gains or losses and the use of debt financing. Blatz’s work was published in a number of journals, and he was a member of the American Accounting Association and the American Taxation Association.

Carol J. Boyd, Deborah J. Oakley Collegiate Professor of Nursing and professor of nursing, School of Nursing; professor of women’s studies, LSA; research professor, Medical School; and research professor, Institute for Research on Women and Gender (IRWG), May 31, 2019. She received her Bachelor of General Studies degree in 1973 from U-M, her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in 1978 from Oakland University and her Master of Science in Nursing degree and Ph.D. from Wayne State University in 1982 and 1987, respectively. Boyd joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Boyd held several leadership positions, including director of IRWG from 2005-11. She was the first woman at U-M to be awarded the Golden Apple Award for teaching in 1996. Boyd was a recognized scholar in the studies of gender, vulnerable populations and risky health behavior. She has been a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing since 1996.

Teresa M. Bruggeman, assistant professor of nursing, School of Nursing, May 31, 2019. Bruggeman received her registered nursing degree in 1963 from the Bellevue School of Nursing, her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1967 from Hunter College and her Ph.D. in 1974 from U-M. She joined the U-M faculty in 1979. Bruggeman was particularly interested in the adaptive and maladaptive aspects of the inflammatory and immune responses, and she acquired an extensive background on the normal cellular and chemical mechanism involved in these responses. She applied this information to understand how chronic inflammation underlines the development of atherosclerosis. Bruggeman was primarily responsible for teaching undergraduate anatomy and physiology courses and pathophysiology courses. Through her work on task forces and the curriculum committee, Bruggeman contributed extensively to the development and review of the graduate and undergraduate curriculums of the School of Nursing.

Bruce O. Bublitz, professor of accounting, UM-Dearborn College of Business, Aug. 31, 2018. Bublitz received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1972 from Illinois State University and his Master of Advanced Studies degree and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1975 and 1982, respectively. He joined the UM-Dearborn faculty in 2005, and served as dean of its School of Management from 2005-07. Bublitz was a dedicated teacher with publication in a number of leading journals, including The Accounting Review, the Journal of Accounting Research and Internal Auditing. He taught a wide variety of courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Bublitz also served the profession and community as a member of the board of directors for the Kansas Society of CPAs as well as the Texas Business Hall of Fame.

Judith M. Connett, research assistant professor, pathology, Medical School, May 2, 2019. Connett received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968 from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. in 1979 from Washington University in St. Louis. She joined the U-M faculty as an assistant research scientist in the Department of Surgery in 2002, and joined the Department of Pathology as a research assistant professor in 2006. Connett’s work in the Department of Surgery focused on breast cancer as a researcher, immunologist and cell biologist. In the Department of Pathology, Connett was hired as a science writer, editor and critical reviewer of grant proposal submissions and manuscripts. She was successfully awarded more than 20 grants throughout the course of her academic career, and she helped countless others edit and write all levels of grant proposals. Connett was a member of a number of professional societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Steven N. Dworkin, professor of Romance linguistics and professor of linguistics, LSA, May 31, 2019. Dworkin received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968 from Carleton University, his Master of Arts degree in 1969 from the University of Illinois, and his Ph.D. in 1974 from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the U-M faculty in 1979. Dworkin was chair of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures from 1998-2003 and director of the English Language Institute from 2008-13. He taught undergraduate and graduate courses in Spanish, Romance linguistics and linguistics. He authored three books, and co-edited the volume, “Lexical Studies of Medieval Spanish Texts: A Bibliography of Concordances, Glossaries, Vocabularies and Selected Word Studies.” Dworkin was the author of more than 100 articles on topics in Spanish and Romance historical linguistics in leading journals, collective and homage volumes and encyclopedias. He promoted a culture of cooperative learning in the Department of Linguistics and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.

Anthony Elliott, professor of music (cello), School of Music, Theatre & Dance, May 31, 2019. Elliott received his Bachelor of Music degree from Indiana University in 1970, and he joined the U-M faculty in 1994. He was the winner of the First Emanuel Feuermann Memorial International Cello Solo Competition, and has performed as soloist with a number of respected orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic and the Detroit Symphony. Elliott appeared in chamber music with the present and former concertmasters of the Berlin Philharmonic, the Concertgebouw of Amsterdam, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and the Cleveland Orchestra. As a guest artist, he performed at numerous national and international festivals, and he also appeared as a member of Quartet Canada. At U-M, Elliott served as executive committee member, ombudsperson, interim chair of the Department of Strings, and senior counselor to the senior vice provost for academic affairs.

Katherine Freese, George E. Uhlenbeck Collegiate Professor of Physics and professor of physics, LSA, May 31, 2019. Freese received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1977 from Princeton University, her Master of Arts degree in 1981 from Columbia University, and her Ph.D. in 1984 from the University of Chicago. She joined the U-M faculty in 1991. Freese is a world-renowned theoretical cosmologist whose work at the interface of astrophysics and particle physics includes about 200 papers. Among her achievements, she pioneered the theoretical work that led to the beginning of underground dark matter experiments worldwide, and she put forth the idea of dark stars — a new phase of star powered by dark-matter annihilation instead of nuclear fusion. Freese was a founding member of the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, and served as director of the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics from 2014-16. She was awarded a Simons Foundation Fellowship in 2012 and the Lilienfeld Award from the American Physical Society in 2019.

Deborah E. Goldberg, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Margaret B. Davis Distinguished University Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, LSA, May 31, 2019. Goldberg received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974 from Barnard College, Columbia University and her Ph.D. in 1980 from the University of Arizona. She joined the U-M faculty in 1983. An internationally recognized leader in population and community ecology, Goldberg’s foundational research explored the processes that control the structure and function of ecological communities over a variety of spatial and temporal scales and how these processes are affected by environmental change. Goldberg served as chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and was involved in the M-Bio/M-Sci and the Authentic Research Connection programs. She received several awards, including the Sarah Goddard Power Award and the Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award.

Marion A. Guck, professor of music (music theory), School of Music, Theatre & Dance, May 31, 2019. Guck received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971 from the State University of New York at Geneseo and her Master of Music degree and Ph.D. from U-M in 1976 and 1981, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1996. Guck had many articles and book chapters published by the university presses of Cambridge, Cornell and Oxford, as well as in important journals in her field, including Perspectives of New Music. She has presented papers at several places, including the Library of Congress, and held editorial positions at Music Theory Online, Perspectives of New Music, Music Theory Spectrum, and In Theory Only. At U-M, she helped initiate changes that encouraged faculty to consider more effective mentoring and admissions practices. In 2017, Guck received the Horace H. Rackham’s John H. D’Arms Faculty Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentoring in the Humanities.

Imane A. Hakam, associate professor of French, UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences, May 31, 2019. Hakam received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1977, her Master of Arts degree in 1983, and her Ph.D. in 1990 from Cairo University. She joined the UM-Flint faculty in 1991. Some of Hakam’s faculty governance and administrative work included service as the library officer for foreign languages, the French program head, the interim foreign languages department chair and the Honors Program representative for French. She was active in a number of committees, including the Admissions and Scholarship Committee and the Accreditation and Strategic Planning Committee. Hakam is a founding member of the Egyptian Association of Teachers of French. In her research, her extensive study of Huysmans and other French and francophone authors produced several publications in renowned scholarly journals and presentations at national conferences.

Sharon C. Herbert, Charles K. Williams, II Distinguished University Professor of Classical Archaeology, professor of classical archaeology and Greek, and research scientist and curator in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, LSA, May 31, 2019. Herbert received her Bachelor of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1966 and 1972, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1973. Herbert was best known as a specialist in ancient pottery, and as a field archaeologist who directed important excavations in Israel and Egypt, focusing on the mid- and later first millennium BCE. Her research concentrated on the lives of the inhabitants of rural settlements, especially in the multiethnic borderlands of northern Israel. Herbert served as chair of the Department of Classical Studies and director of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. A major achievement of her term as director of the museum was the construction of the William E. Upjohn Exhibit Wing. Herbert received the John H. D’Arms Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentorship in 2000.

C. Peethambaran Kartha, David M. French Professor and professor of quantitative methods, UM-Flint School of Management, Dec. 31, 2018. Kartha received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1962 from the University of Kerala, his Master of Science degree in 1966 from the Indian Agricultural Research Institute, and his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1969 and 1973, respectively. He joined UM-Flint in 1979. Kartha’s teaching and research interests focused on the areas of statistics, management science, operations management and quality management systems. He developed curricula for the School of Management’s M.B.A. program. Kartha served as a senior examiner for the Michigan Quality Leadership Award for several years. In 1996, Kartha created a network for area small business organizations to provide guidance and assistance in obtaining a specific certification with a Michigan Research Excellence Grant. He received UM-Flint’s Faculty Achievement Award for Distinguished Service in 1991.

Edith C. Kieffer, professor of social work, School of Social Work, May 31, 2019. Kieffer received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1973 from the University of Oregon and her Master of Public Health degree and Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii in 1978 and 1991, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1995. Kieffer conducted research that addressed health and health care disparities. She and collaborators evaluated the effectiveness of Detroit-based community health worker programs in improving the health of pregnant and postpartum women, and people with and at risk for type 2 diabetes. Kieffer was also a co-investigator for the evaluation of the Healthy Michigan Plan Medicaid expansion. She taught courses on several subjects, including health care policies and services and ethical dilemmas in health. Kieffer is a co-founder and board member of the Michigan Community Health Worker Alliance.

Sherrie A. Kossoudji, associate professor of social work, School of Social Work; adjunct associate professor of economics, LSA, May 31, 2019. Kossoudji received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1976 from Miami University and her Ph.D. in 1984 from U-M. She joined U-M as a Mellon Assistant Research Scientist at the Population Studies Center in 1985, and was appointed assistant professor in 1987. Kossoudji concentrated on labor and wealth issues, and gender differences in economic outcomes for those at the margins of society. Her principal research was on the economics of immigration. Among her research products, she published articles on the incentives to cross the border without papers, the negative impact of border apprehensions, and immigrant asset accumulation and home ownership. Kossoudji taught courses in both economics and social work, and she developed a weeklong experiential course at the U.S.-Mexico border.

James E. Krier, Earl Warren DeLano Professor of Law and professor of law, Law School, May 31, 2019. Krier received his Bachelor of Science and law degrees from the University of Wisconsin in 1961 and 1966, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1983. Krier was a leading scholar in the fields of property and environmental law. He presented numerous invited lectures on these subjects and testified before federal and state legislative committees. Krier’s research and teaching drew extensively on economic theory, other social sciences and humanistic disciplines to illuminate law as a social institution and as an intellectual discipline. He authored or co-authored several books, including “Environmental Law and Policy” and “Pollution and Policy.” Krier held visiting professor appointments at Harvard Law School, Oxford University, the University of Alabama School of Law, and the Cardozo School of Law. He received the Brigham-Kanner Property Rights Prize by the Marshall-Wythe School of Law in 2012.

Edward W. Larsen, professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences in the College of Engineering, May 31, 2019. Larsen received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1966 and Ph.D. in 1971 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He joined the U-M faculty in 1986. Larsen’s research focused on the development of advanced algorithms for the mathematical analysis and the computational simulation of problems associated with the interaction of radiation with matter (particle transport). His computational work led to more accurate discretization methods for deterministic transport calculations, more efficient and robust methods for accelerating the iterative convergence of deterministic calculations, and more efficient hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic methods. Larsen co-authored more than 350 scholarly papers and mentored 42 Ph.D. students. He was elected a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and received several awards, including the U.S. Department of Energy’s E.O. Lawrence Award.

John C. Lee, professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences, College of Engineering, May 31, 2019. Lee received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1963 from Seoul National University and his Ph.D. in 1969 from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the U-M faculty in 1974, and served as chair of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences from 1999-2004. Lee’s research focused on physics and engineering analysis of nuclear systems, including space-time reactor kinetics, optimization of nuclear fuel cycles, transmutation of spent nuclear fuel, risk and safety analysis of nuclear systems, power plant simulation and control, advanced reactor design and analysis, and coupled multiphysics analysis of nuclear reactors. He authored or co-authored more than 200 scholarly publications, a textbook on reactor safety, and three book chapters. Lee was elected a fellow of the American Nuclear Society in 1988 and received the ANS Arthur Holly Compton Award in 2015.

Laura Lein, Katherine Reebel Collegiate Professor of Social Work and professor of social work, School of Social Work; and professor of anthropology, LSA, May 31, 2019. Lein received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969 from Swarthmore College and her Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1970 and 1973, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 2009 and served as dean of the School of Social Work from 2009-16. Lein’s work concentrated on the interface between families in poverty and the institutions that serve them. She was the principal investigator on multiple grants on poverty, family and women’s issues, and impoverished populations. Lein served on the boards of many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences Research Council Committee on Child Development Research and Public Policy. She authored or co-authored numerous publications on welfare, health care, children and families.

David L. Neuhoff, Joseph E. and Anne P. Rowe Professor of Electrical Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science, College of Engineering, May 31, 2019. Neuhoff received his Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree in 1970 from Cornell University and his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1972 and 1974, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1974. Neuhoff was an internationally recognized expert in information theory, source coding and image processing. In the early 1980s, Neuhoff chaired the review committee whose proposal for restructuring led to the creation of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. As associate chair of this new department, he oversaw the development of its new graduate programs as well as its growth in the systems areas of electrical engineering. Later, he led the restructuring of the electrical engineering undergraduate program. Neuhoff received a number of recognitions, including the IEEE Information Theory Society Service Award and the College of Engineering’s Stephen S. Atwood Award.

Vasantha Padmanabhan, professor of pediatrics, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and professor of molecular and integrative physiology, Medical School; and professor of environmental health sciences, School of Public Health, May 31, 2019. Padmanabhan received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1964 from the University of Mysore, her Master of Science degree in 1966 from the University of Bangalore, and her Ph.D. in 1971 from the Indian Institute of Science. She joined the U-M faculty in 1985. Padmanabhan’s career focused on the physiology and pathophysiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and metabolic systems. Her research has been groundbreaking in advancing our understanding of the origins of reproductive and metabolic disorders and identifying prevention and treatment targets for clinical translation. Padmanabhan published 188 peer-reviewed articles in the leading journals, authored a number of book chapters, and presented at numerous national and international symposia. She was inducted in the Medical School’s League of Research Excellence in 2011.

Eileen Pollack, professor of English language and literature, LSA, May 31, 2019. Pollack received her Bachelor of Science degree from Yale University in 1978, and her Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Iowa in 1983. She joined the U-M faculty in 1994. Pollack taught graduate and undergraduate classes in fiction writing, creative nonfiction, and contemporary literature. From 2006-07, she co-directed the University of Michigan’s M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing, now known as the Helen Zell Writers’ Program. She was named director of the program in 2007 and served in that role until 2011. Pollack was also an acclaimed author of six works of fiction, two works of nonfiction, a children’s book, a creative nonfiction textbook and anthology, 23 short stories, 49 essays and articles and two poems. She has received several honors, including a U-M Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, two Pushcart Prizes for fiction and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.

Rudy J. Richardson, Dow Professor of Toxicology and professor of environmental health sciences, School of Public Health; and associate professor of neurology, Medical School, May 31, 2019. Richardson received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1967 from Wichita State University. After attaining Ph.D. candidacy in chemistry from Stony Brook University in 1970, he transferred to Harvard University, where he received his Master of Science and Doctor of Science degrees in 1973 and 1974, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1975. Richardson was an international authority in toxicology and mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. In the 1990s, he carried out landmark epidemiology studies implicating occupational exposures to certain classes of pesticides and combinations of heavy metals in the etiology of Parkinson’s disease. He made major contributions to our understanding of the chemistry and toxicology of organophosphorus compounds and the role of neuropathy target esterase in chemically induced neurodegenerative disease. Richardson has served as director of the Toxicology Program, and as president of the Neurotoxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology.

Suellyn Scarnecchia, clinical professor of law, Law School, May 31, 2019. Scarnecchia received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Northwestern University in 1978 and her law degree from U-M in 1981. Scarnecchia held a number of appointments at the Law School, including clinical professor of law and associate dean for law school administration. She has taught courses in the Law School’s Human Trafficking Clinic, Child Advocacy Law Clinic, and Women and the Law Clinic since 1987. After serving as dean of the University of New Mexico School of Law, she returned to U-M as vice president and general counsel in 2008. In this role, her work helped guide the institution through a number of complex and challenging issues. In 2015, Scarnecchia helped launch the Law School’s Veterans Legal Clinic, and she was one of the founders of the Michigan Poverty Law Program in 1997. Scarnecchia served as the Law School’s diversity, equity and inclusion strategic plan coordinator.

Ruth S. Scodel, D.R. Shackleton Bailey Collegiate Professor of Greek and Latin and professor of Greek and Latin, LSA, May 31, 2019. Scodel received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1973 from the University of California, Berkeley and her Ph.D. in 1978 from Harvard University. She joined the U-M faculty in 1984. Scodel had an outstanding record of publication in the broad field of ancient Greek literature. Her six scholarly books range from Homer to Greek tragedy, and she has also published dozens of articles, book chapters, and book reviews on almost every aspect of classical Greek literature. Scodel chaired her department from 2007 to 2013 and she headed the LSA Honors Program from 1992 to 1997. She served as president of the Michigan Classical Conference, the Classical Association of the Middle West and South, and the Society for Classical Studies. Scodel received the Society for Classical Studies’ Distinguished Service Medal in 2019.

Patricia Simons, professor of history of art and professor of women’s studies, LSA, Feb. 28, 2019. Simons received her Bachelor of Arts degree and her Ph.D. from the University of Melbourne in 1974 and 1985, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1989. A specialist in art and visual culture of the Italian Renaissance, Simons was best known for her scholarship on gender and sexuality. She co-edited the volume, “Patronage, Art, and Society in Renaissance Italy” and two subsequent publications in 1988 established the foundation and framework for analyzing visual constructions of gender: “Women in Frames: the Gaze, the Eye, the Profile in Renaissance Portraiture” and “Gender and Sexuality in Renaissance and Baroque Italy: A Working Bibliography.” In well over 50 articles, Simons has maintained her place in the vanguard of a feminist art historical engagement. She led a major revision of the art history curriculum, and she played a key role in the formation of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program.

Maris A. Vinovskis, A.M. and H.P. Bentley Professor of History and professor of history, LSA; professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy; and research professor, Institute for Social Research, May 31, 2019. Vinovskis received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1965 from Wesleyan University and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1966 and 1975, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1974. Vinovskis was a specialist in the social history of the United States and a leader in the study of family and population, education and social change, and the social history of the Civil War. He received a number of grants and fellowships from the Ford, Guggenheim, Rockefeller and Spencer foundations. He served as a deputy staff director of the U.S. House Select Committee on Population under the Carter administration and was a consultant on policy-related work during the Reagan, Bush and Clinton administrations.

Kim A. Winick, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, College of Engineering, May 31, 2019. Winick received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1976 from The Pennsylvania State University, and his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from U-M in 1977 and 1981, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1988. Winick’s research spanned integrated optics, lasers, nonlinear optics, information theory and optical/RF communication systems. His group was among the first to refine and apply a technique using ultrashort laser pulses to fabricate optical devices that was subsequently adopted by researchers and companies worldwide. Winick taught a broad array of courses — including analog, fiber optical and digital communications, and signals and systems — and played a key role in developing several of these courses. He also helped develop the curriculum for dual-degree students from the UM-SJTU Joint Institute in Shanghai. Winick received several awards, including the College of Engineering’s Service Excellence Award.

Leigh A. Woods, professor of theatre and drama, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, May 31, 2019. Woods received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1970 from Harvard College, his Master of Fine Arts degree in 1972 from Columbia University, and his Ph.D. in 1979 from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Woods wrote extensively about performance and the history of acting in several works, including, “Garrick Claims the Stage: Acting as Social Emblem in Eighteenth-Century England.” As a member of the Actors’ Equity Association, Woods performed more than 100 roles onstage, and in 2018, he played Charley in the staged reading of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” starring Alec Baldwin in the Power Center. Woods served for many years as the head of graduate studies and the head of theatre studies in the Department of Theatre & Drama. Within the school, he served on the SMTD Executive Committee and the Faculty Council for Graduate Studies.

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