University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

August 24, 2017

Regents Roundup — May 2017

May 18, 2017

Regents Roundup — May 2017

Topic: Regents

The following items were approved by the Board of Regents at its meeting Thursday.

Design approved for lab renovations at NCRC

The Board of Regents approved the schematic design for the North Campus Research Complex Buildings 20 and 25 Laboratory Renovation project. The $78.5 million project will renovate approximately 158,000 gross square feet of space to accommodate the Medical School's wet laboratory research growth over the next decade, construct a 6,900-gross-square-foot infill addition to improve connectivity between the buildings and throughout the complex, address deferred maintenance, and provide accessibility improvements and new finishes. The Medical School is funding the project that is currently scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2019.

Renovations planned at G. G. Brown

Approximately 7,400 gross square feet of wet laboratory space on the first and third floor of the George Granger Brown Memorial Laboratories building will be renovated to accommodate research activities in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The College of Engineering will fund the $1.6 million project that is scheduled to be completed this fall.

Central Power Plant improvements slated

A $1.9 million project at the Central Power Plant will replace and upgrade the wastewater collection piping system used to collect boiler water discharge and other water drains. Utility resources will fund the project with construction scheduled to be completed in the winter of 2019.

Academic calendar for 2019-20 approved

The 2019-20 academic year will start Sept. 3, the day after the Labor Day holiday, and end with spring commencement May 2. The calendar was developed following the university's well-established academic calendar guidelines. The fall term has 68 days and will end Dec. 15. The winter term has 69 days; spring break will begin Feb. 29 with classes resuming March 9. The spring/summer term will begin May 5 and end Aug. 21. There are no conflicts with religious holidays.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

Marco C. Bottino, associate professor of dentistry, School of Dentistry, effective Aug. 1, 2017.

William Elliott III, professor of social work, School of Social Work, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

Melody L. Racine, associate professor of music, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

Matthew J. Smith, associate professor of social work, SSW, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

Antoinette Louise Toppin, professor of music, SMTD, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

Gwen Yu, associate professor of accounting, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

Named professorships

*Hasan B. Alam, Norman W. Thompson Professor of Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Gordon L. Amidon, William I. Higuchi Distinguished University Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

Ellen M. Arruda, Maria Comninou Collegiate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, effective May 1, 2017 through April 30, 2022.

*James R. Baker Jr., Ruth Dow Doan Professor of Biologic Nanotechnology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2018.

Charles L. Brooks III, Cyrus Levinthal Distinguished University Professor of Chemistry and Biophysics, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

John M. Carethers, C. Richard Boland Distinguished University Professor of Internal Medicine and Human Genetics, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

*Juan R. Cole, Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Shirish M. Gadgeel, Marylou Kennedy Research Professor of Thoracic Oncology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2021.

*Elisabeth R. Gerber, Jack L. Walker, Jr. Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Eric Gilbert, John Derby Evans Endowed Professor of Information, School of Information, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through August 31, 2022.

Mark D. Hunter, Earl E. Werner Distinguished University Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

*Brian A. Jacob, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Ford School, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*James M. Joyce, Cooper Harold Langford Collegiate Professor of Philosophy, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Martin E. Katz, Gwendolyn Koldofsky Distinguished University Professor of Music, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

*Mary C. Kelley, Ruth Bordin Collegiate Professor of History, American Culture, and Women's Studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Sarra Lev, Louis and Helen Padnos Visiting Professor of Judaic Studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Dec. 31, 2017.

Zachary N. London, James W. Albers Collegiate Professor of Neurology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2021.

*John Montgomery, Margaret and Herman Sokol Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Will Potter, Howard R. Marsh Visiting Professor of Journalism, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through April 30, 2018.

*Alexander D. Potts, Max Loehr Collegiate Professor of the History of Art, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*Alnawaz Rehemtulla, Ruth Tuttle Freeman Research Professor of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*Benjamin M. Segal, Holtom-Garrett Family Professor of Neurology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Sidonie A. Smith, Lorna G. Goddison Distinguished University Professor of English and Women's Studies, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

*Billy Tsai, Corydon Ford Collegiate Professor, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*George Tsebelis, Anatol Rapoport Collegiate Professor of Political Science, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Ralph T. Yang, John B. Fenn Distinguished University Professor of Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

Administrative appointments

Valeria M. Bertacco, associate dean for academic programs and initiatives, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, effective June 1, 2017 through June 30, 2020.

*Elizabeth R. Cole, associate dean for social sciences, LSA, effective July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019.

Roger Cone, vice provost and director of the biosciences initiative, effective immediately.

*Ruth E. Dunkle, associate dean for faculty and academic affairs, School of Social Work, effective June 1, 2017 through Dec. 31, 2017.

Fiona Lee, associate dean for diversity, equity, inclusion, and professional development, LSA, effective July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2021.

Preeti Malani, chief health officer for U-M, effective June 1 through May 31, 2020.

Jonathan Massey, dean of the A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, effective Aug. 1, 2017 through June 30, 2022.

Brian D. Noble, chair, Division of Computer Science and Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, effective July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2022.

*Henry L. Paulson, Lucile Groff Chair of Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, Medical School, effective Aug. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Catherine Shaw, associate vice provost for academic and faculty affairs, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective June 1, 2017.

Arthur M. Verhoogt, associate dean for academic programs and initiatives, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, effective Aug. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2020.

Change in faculty titles

Maria J. Arquero de Alacron, to associate professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, effective June 1, 2012.

Scott D. Campbell, to associate professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

Barry N. Checkoway, to professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012.

 Lan Deng, to associate professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012.

Robert L. Fishman, to professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

Joseph D. Grengs, to associate professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

Douglas S. Kelbaugh, to professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012.

Larissa S. Larsen, to associate professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

Matthew D. Lassiter, to associate professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

Jonathan Levine, to professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012.

Martin J. Murray, to professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

 Richard K. Norton, to professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

David E. Thacher, to associate professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

June Manning Thomas, to professor of urban and regional planning, with tenure, Taubman College, effective June 1, 2012. 

Dearborn campus

Carolyn Kraus, Dorothy Lee Collegiate Professor, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*Mitchel A. Sollenberger, associate provost for undergraduate programs and integrative learning, office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2020.

Qiang Zhu, William E. Stirton Professor, College of Engineering and Computer Science, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Flint campus

Kristi N. Hottenstein, vice chancellor for enrollment management, Office of the Chancellor, effective July 1, 2017.

*Reappointments

Retirements

Edward H. Cooper, Thomas M. Cooley Professor of Law and professor of law, Law School, May 31, 2017. Cooper received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1961 from Dartmouth College and his Bachelor of Laws degree in 1964 from Harvard University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1972 and was named the Thomas M. Cooley Professor of Law in 1988.  He served as the associate dean for academic affairs in the Law School from 1981 to 1994. He is the co-author of the original, second and third editions of "Federal Practice and Procedure: Jurisdiction," a leading multi-volume treatise on federal jurisdiction and procedure. His numerous publications have contributed to legal scholarship for more than 40 years. In recognition of Cooper's vast knowledge of civil procedure and jurisdiction, he was elected to the Council of the American Law Institute. He was a reporter for the Uniform Transfer of Litigation Act and reporter for the Federal-State Jurisdiction Committee of the Judicial Conference of the United States, as well as a member of and reporter for its Civil Rules Advisory Committee.

Margaret E. Dewar, professor of urban and regional planning, iA. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, May 31, 2017. Dewar received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Wellesley College in 1970, her Master of City Planning degree from Harvard University in 1974 and her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1979. She joined the U-M faculty in 1988, and served as chair of the Urban and Regional Planning Program from 1998 to 2004. At various points during her career, Dewar was the faculty director of the Detroit Community Partnership Center, the Ginsberg Center for Community Service and Learning and the Real Estate Development Certificate program. Dewar's research focuses on the areas of economic development; housing and community development; urban environmental planning; and urban land use. Dewar has authored, co-authored or edited more than 80 publications, and has received more than $8.5 million in research funding.  In addition to her teaching and numerous university and national academic professional activities, Dewar directed a significant expansion of the university’s partnerships with lower-income communities. 

Jane E. Dutton, Robert L. Kahn Distinguished University Professor of Business Administration and Psychology, professor of organizational behavior, human resource management, corporate strategy and international business, Stephen M. Ross School of Business; and professor of psychology, LSA, May 31, 2017. Dutton received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974 from Colby College, and her Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1981 and 1983, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1989. Dutton's research and expertise focused on the intersection of strategy, management and organizations, and psychology. Her work sought to understand the processes that build capabilities and strengths of employees in organizations. In particular, Dutton critically examined how high quality connections and identity processes increase employees' and organizations' capabilities. Her research explored compassion and organizations, resilience and organizations, and energy and organizations. Dutton's earlier work studied the processes of organizational adaptation, how strategic issues are interpreted and managed in organizations and issues of organizational identity and change. She published more than 100 articles and book chapters, edited 13 books and wrote a book for managers titled "Energize your Workplace: How to Build and Sustain High-Quality Connections at Work." She also co-edited the book "Using a Positive Lens to Explore Social Change and Organizations: Building A Theoretical and Research Foundation." Dutton co-founded the Center for Positive Organizations, co-directed the Interdisciplinary Committee of Organizational Studies and served as a consultant for a variety of organizations. 

Laurence A. Goldstein, professor of English language and literature, LSA, May 31, 2017. Goldstein received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1965 from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his Ph.D. in 1970 from Brown University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1970. Goldstein began his teaching and scholarly life as a specialist in British Romanticism and became one of the nation's indispensable experts on 20th-century poetry and fiction. During his 32-year tenure as editor of The Michigan Quarterly Review, he expanded the university's literary journal into a forum for cultural, creative and interdisciplinary inquiry of the broadest dimensions. He oversaw the transformative expansion of the journal's graphic and visual formats, commissioned work by leading intellectuals and artists and launched the careers of many writers who went on to subsequent fame. Goldstein trained scores of assistant editors in the art and discipline of literary judgment. He is an accomplished poet as well as a scholar, editor and literary critic. His four volumes of poetry include "Altamira," "The Three Gardens," "Cold Reading" and "A Room in California." He wrote several monographs, including "Poetry Los Angeles: Reading the Essential Poems of the City" and "The Flying Machine and Modern Literature." Goldstein taught a full rotation of courses in the Department of English and served on a variety of advisory and governance committees.

Eric J. Hill, clinical professor of practice in architecture, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, May 31, 2017. Hill received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1970 from the University of Pennsylvania, his Master of Architecture degree in 1972 from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in 1976 from the University of Pennsylvania. Over the years, he held a number of U-M faculty positions, beginning with adjunct associate professor in 1993. Hill is a registered architect and a LEED-accredited professional with the U.S. Green Building Council. He taught courses in professional practice and design entrepreneurship, and was a member of the doctoral faculty in architecture as well as an affiliated faculty member with the U-M Center for Entrepreneurship. Hill is a member of the American Institute of Architects and was elected to its College of Fellows — the highest membership honor a member can receive for exceptional work and contributions to architecture and society. Hill received the Gold Medal Award from the AIA Detroit Chapter and is a co-author of "AIA Detroit: The American Institute of Architects Guide to Detroit Architecture." He is a past board member of AIA Detroit, AIA Michigan and the Michigan Architectural Foundation. He also served as coordinator for the Intern Development Program for the Detroit region and the state of Michigan as well as the Taubman College architect licensing adviser for the Intern Development Program of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards.

J. Wayne Jones, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and professor of materials and metallurgical engineering, College of Engineering, May 31, 2017. Jones received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1971 from Western Kentucky University and his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University in 1973 and 1976, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1978. Jones' research focused on understanding structure-mechanical property relationships in advanced metal alloys for automotive and aerospace applications. He published extensively on the mechanisms of materials degradation associated with cyclic stressing and high temperature exposure in automotive and aerospace materials. Jones is widely recognized for his research on the application of ultrasonic fatigue techniques to the study of damage mechanisms in the very high cycle fatigue regime. He served as associate dean for undergraduate education in the College of Engineering and associate director of the ADVANCE Program. He also served as the vice president and president of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, and was elected a fellow of ASM International in 2000. Jones received the College of Engineering's 1938E Award in 1983, the university's Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award in 2007 and ASM International's Alfred Easton White Distinguished Teacher Award in 2010.

Linda Yuen-Ching Lim, professor of corporate strategy and international business, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, May 31, 2017. Lim received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1972 and a Master of Arts degree in 1975 from the University of Cambridge; a Master of Arts degree in 1973 from Yale University; and her Ph.D. in 1978 from U-M. She joined the U-M faculty in 1985. Lim's research on the political economy of development in Southeast Asia focused on the economic development of Singapore, overseas Chinese business in Southeast Asia and female and foreign labor in developing countries. She authored, co-authored or edited six books and more than 100 other monographs, journal articles and book chapters in these and related areas of international trade and investment. Among the leadership roles Lim held over her career, she served as the research director and director of the Southeast Asia Business Program; as the interim director and executive committee member of the Center for International Business Education; and as the director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies. She also served as the associate director of the International Institute; as a member of the Board of Advisors of the Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellows; and as a faculty adviser of the U-M Singapore Students Association and the Ross Asia Business Conference. Lim co-founded the U-M Alumni of Singapore, and received the Stephen M. Ross School of Business' Victor L. Bernard Teaching Leadership Award.

Rudi P. Lindner, professor of astronomy and professor of history, LSA, May 31, 2017. Lindner received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1965 from Harvard College, his Master of Arts degree in 1967 from the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. in 1976 from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the U-M faculty in 1977. Lindner's research focused on medieval Eurasian history and the history of modern astrophysics and cosmology. He wrote three books and numerous articles on a wide array of topics, including the history of medieval Europe, medieval and modern historiography, the economic and social history of steppe nomads, early Ottoman history, medieval Anatolia, Islamic monetary history, the history of printing in the Near East, the history of relativistic cosmology and the development of astrophysics between the wars. Lindner created statistical methods of analyzing pastoral activities over generations and he did pioneering work on the changing fortunes of the theories of general relativity. Lindner won prestigious fellowships from several leading organizations, including the American Council of Learned Societies, the Fulbright-Hayes Program, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Social Science Research Council. He held visiting professorships in Hungary, Israel and Italy as well as lectureships across Europe, the Near East and the United States.

Vijayan N. Nair, Donald A. Darling Collegiate Professor of Statistics, professor of statistics, LSA; professor of industrial and operations engineering, College of Engineering; and faculty associate, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, May 31, 2017. Nair received his Bachelor of Economics degree in 1972 from the University of Malaya and his Ph.D. in 1978 from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the U-M faculty in 1993, and served as chair of the Department of Statistics from 1998 to 2010. Nair has an international reputation for his research in industrial statistics. His work explored a number of areas, including statistical modeling and inference, credit modeling and risk analysis, engineering statistics, quality and productivity improvements, reliability engineering, design and analysis of experiments, data networks, statistics in neuroscience, and behavioral intervention studies. As chair, Nair played an instrumental role in building the U-M Department of Statistics into one of the top programs in the country. He is a co-founder of the Michigan Data Science Institute and helped launch the undergraduate program in data science. Nair is a former editor of the journals Technometrics and International Statistical Review. He is a former president of the International Statistical Institute and the International Society for Business and Industrial Statistics, and is a former chair of the Statistics Division of the American Society for Quality. Nair has been recognized as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society for Quality, the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics.

Richard E. Nisbett, Theodore M. Newcomb Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, professor of psychology, LSA; research professor, Research Center for Group Dynamics, Institute for Social Research, May 31, 2017. Nisbett received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1962 from Tufts University and his Ph.D. in 1966 from Columbia University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1971. Nisbett is widely regarded as one of the most creative and productive social psychologists within the field of psychology. As an author of more than 100 articles and books, his work has been cited more than 75,000 times. Among Nisbett's most fundamental contributions to psychology is his 1980 masterpiece with Lee Ross, "Human Inferences: Strategies and Shortcomings of Social Judgment," which summarized much of his early and influential work on human cognition. He played an instrumental role in creating the field of cultural psychology. Nisbett authored "The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently…and Why" — one of the first systematic investigations of modes of thought in the East and West. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1992 and the National Academy of Science in 2002.  He received a number of awards, including the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award, the Association for Psychological Science's William James Fellow Award for Distinguished Scientific Achievements and the American Psychological Foundation's Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology.  

Robert G. Pachella, professor of psychology, LSA, May 31, 2017. Pachella received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1966 from U-M, and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from The John Hopkins University in 1968 and 1970, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1970. Pachella helped grow the new field of cognitive psychology. His rigorous empirical and theoretical investigations yielded numerous conceptual insights into the nature of human visual perception, short-term memory and speed-accuracy tradeoffs in information-processing dynamics as reported through a lengthy series of high-profile journal articles and book chapters. A remarkable teacher and dedicated mentor, a number of his former doctoral students have achieved successful academic careers, served as department chairs at other leading institutions or received prestigious honors. Pachella also became legendary for his undergraduate classes, including small honors seminars on topics such as law and psychology and larger lecture courses on topics such as perception, science and reality. He was an accomplished administrator, directing the world-famous Michigan Human Performance Center for several years, serving on many psychology faculty committees and participating in the LSA Honors Program as both an instructor and faculty adviser for several decades. He received the Distinguished Faculty Service Award in 1974 and the Ruth M. Sinclair Award in 1986.

Thomas J. Powell, professor of social work, School of Social Work, May 31, 2017. Powell received his Bachelor of Science degree and Master of Social Work degree from Boston College in 1958 and 1960, respectively. He earned his Ph.D. in 1966 from Smith College, and joined the U-M faculty in 1966. Powell's research focused on the intersection of mental health, substance use and self-help groups. He was the principal investigator on grants funded by the Ittelson Foundation, the Michigan Department of Mental Health and the National Institute of Mental Health. As principal investigator for the NIMH-funded Center for Self-Help Research, Powell collaborated with a number of organizations, including the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance and several consumer-run agencies. He has also been an active participant in research on community support systems for consumers and family caregivers. Powell published numerous articles in a number of leading scholarly journals, and his accomplishments in research, scholarship and service earned him recognition as a mental health consultant for the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean region and election as a fellow to the American Orthopsychiatric Association. He shared his expertise and time with the local community as a board member of Washtenaw County's National Alliance on Mental Illness and the Home of New Vision.

Gopal Prasad, Raoul Bott Collegiate Professor of Mathematics and professor of mathematics, LSA, May 31, 2017. Prasad received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1963 from Magadh University, his Master of Science degree in 1965 from Patna University and his Ph.D. in 1976 from the University of Bombay. He joined the U-M faculty in 1992. Prasad is a leading expert on Lie groups and algebraic groups. In his early work, he proved the strong rigidity of lattices in real semisimple groups of rank 1 and also of lattices in p-adic groups. He later studied the topological central extensions of these groups and computed the metaplectic kernel for isotropic groups. Prasad and Andrei S. Rapinchuk gave a precise computation of the metaplectic kernel for all simply connected semi-simple groups. He proved a useful volume formula for semisimple groups. His work with Allen Moy on the representation theory of reductive p-adic groups led to the development of the Moy-Prasad filtration of parahoric subgroups. In recent work with Brian Conrad and Ofer Gabber, Prasad has given a classification of and structure theory for non-abelian pseudo-reductive groups over all imperfect fields. This work settles an outstanding problem in the area and has several important arithmetic applications. Prasad served as the managing editor of the Michigan Mathematical Journal and played an instrumental role in broadening the editorial board to include mathematicians from around the world and enhancing the journal's academic stature. Among his recognitions, he was awarded the Mathematical Sciences Prize from the Government of India's Council on Scientific and Industrial Research and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship.  

Robert E. Quinn, Margaret Elliott Tracy Collegiate Professor of Business Administration and professor of organizational behavior and human resource management, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, May 31, 2017. Quinn received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1970 and his Master of Science degree in 1972 from Brigham Young University, as well as his Ph.D. in 1975 from the University of Cincinnati. He joined the U-M faculty in 1988. Quinn's research and teaching interests focus on leadership, organizational change and effectiveness. He has published 18 books on these subjects with his best-selling book, "Deep Change," selling more than 100,000 copies. The Independent Book Publisher Association recognized his book, "The Best Teacher in You: How to Accelerate Learning and Change Lives," as the best book on education with a Benjamin Franklin Award in 2015. Quinn is particularly known for his work on the competing values framework. It has been used by organizations across the globe and thousands of managers have been trained in the use of the framework. He is one of the originators of the field of positive organizational scholarship and a co-founder of the Center for Positive Organizations at U-M. He has 35 years of experience consulting with major corporations and government agencies, and was elected a fellow of both the National Academy of Management and the World Business Academy.

Pamela A. Raymond, Stephen S. Easter Collegiate Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology, LSA, May 31, 2017. Raymond received her Bachelor of Science degree, Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from U-M in 1971, 1974 and 1976, respectively. Raymond joined the Medical School faculty in 1981. She served as faculty director of the Neuroscience Graduate Program and associate provost for academic and faculty affairs. In 2005, she joined the LSA faculty and served as chair of the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from 2008 to 2014. Raymond's research has enhanced our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of extrinsic and intrinsic signals that regulate neurogenesis (the formation of neurons) and control neuronal specificity and patterning (the expression of differentiated cellular features) in the visual system. Throughout her career, Raymond has championed the teleost fish retina as a unique animal model in which to discover endogenous mechanisms of neurogenesis, the integration of new neurons and photoreceptors into the differentiated retina, the capacity to regenerate neurons, and the multifaceted roles of retinal glia, which both generate new neurons and guide them to their proper locations in the retina. She has published more than 100 scientific articles and co-edited two books, served on numerous federal scientific review panels and chaired the National Eye Institute Board of Scientific Counselors. 

Elisha P. Renne, professor of anthropology and professor of Afroamerican and African studies, LSA, May 31, 2017. Renne received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1970 from New College; her Master of Arts degree in 1985 from the University of Minnesota; and her Master of Philosophy degree and Ph.D. from New York University in 1987 in 1990, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1998. Renne's research topics included the social life of cloth, the relationship of fertility and development and the polio eradication initiative, which are reflected in her first three books. In one of her books, "Cloth That Does Not Die: The Meaning of Cloth in Bunu Social Life," she considered the importance of cloth in constituting social identities. In another, "Population and Progress in a Yoruba Town," she discussed the contradictions between high fertility and local development. Her most recent manuscript, "Veils, Turbans, and Moral Imagination in Northern Nigeria," focuses on Islamic dress and reform movements in Nigeria. Her work emphasizes the perspectives of Nigerians and reflects extensive annual fieldwork conducted in Nigeria from 1994 to 2016. Renne's research has resulted in numerous journal articles, edited volume chapters and presentations at national and international meetings. She served on a number of departmental, dissertation and undergraduate honors theses committees, and led several study-abroad groups focused on the consequences of small-scale gold mining in Ghana. Renne was named a Graham Sustainability Institute's Distinguished Faculty Fellow of Sustainability from 2013 to 2015.

Lawrence S. Root, professor of social work, School of Social Work, May 31, 2017. Root received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968 from Haverford College, his Master of Social Service degree in 1971 from Bryn Mawr College and his Ph.D. in 1980 from the University of Chicago. He joined the U-M faculty in 1978, and served as director of the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations from 1993 to 2008. Root's research and practice explored the intersection of employment and social welfare issues. He directed programs and published in the areas of fringe benefits and social policy, employee assistance programs, aging and work, work-family flexibility, employment issues of low-income individuals and international labor. As director of the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, he worked extensively with union-management joint programs and collaboratively developed a number of innovative programs on topics such as urban entrepreneurship and labor and global change. Root served on the 2002 Presidential Search Advisory Committee and chaired the President's Advisory Committee on Labor Standards and Human Rights, which addressed sweatshop conditions in the production of goods licensed by U-M. More recently, his international work focused on developing labor-management committees in Chinese companies and developing methods for assessing labor standards as a part of trade agreements. He was named a Distinguished Alumnus by the Bryn Mawr's Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research.

Joel A. Smoller, Lamberto Cesari Collegiate Professor of Mathematics and professor of mathematics, LSA, May 31, 2017. Smoller received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1957 from Brooklyn College, his Master of Science degree in 1958 from Ohio University and his Ph.D. in 1963 from Purdue University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1963. Smoller's areas of specialty are shock wave theory, differential equations, dynamical systems and general relativity. He completed research on Navier-Stokes equations, systems of reaction-diffusion equations and bifurcation theory. He pioneered the analysis of numerical difference schemes for conservation laws in several space dimensions, introduced new topological methods to the analysis of partial differential equations and has been fundamental in establishing the shock structure problem in mathematics. Many of his early results have been influential in mathematical biology. Smoller's more recent research has been concerned with problems involving gravity. Smoller has extended his research to stellar dynamics, including rotating Newtonian stars. His long and prestigious academic career includes supervising 28 graduate students and mentoring many postdoctoral faculty, producing more than 180 publications in association with 34 co-authors, and teaching hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students. 

Lydia M. Soo, associate professor of architecture, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, May 31, 2017. Soo received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1976 and her Master of Architecture degree in 1978 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She received her Master of Arts degree and her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1983 and 1989, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1994. Soo is a historian of architecture and architectural theory with special expertise in the Early Modern period. She authored a number of scholarly articles that examined specific problems of 17th-century culture, theory, architecture, urbanism and maps. Soo is internationally recognized for her work on the English architect Sir Christopher Wren. Her later work explored a number of topics, including architectural knowledge production in London after the Great Fire, English architecture in relationship to pre-Orientalist knowledge of buildings in the Levant and geometrical procedures in Italian Baroque design. An inspiring teacher, Soo's courses focused on Renaissance and Baroque buildings and cities, mathematics in architecture, the history of theory and the history of architecture and urbanism. She has been awarded fellowships from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art. 

John E. Tropman, Henry J. Meyer Collegiate Professor of Social Work and professor of social work, School of Social Work, May 31, 2017. Tropman received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1961 from Oberlin College, his Master of Arts degree in 1963 from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. in 1967 from U-M. He joined the School of Social Work faculty in 1965. Tropman's research focused on the organizational elements that create high-performing human service organizations. His work explored a number of topics, including entrepreneurship, effective group decision making, C-level executives, the problem of executive burnout and flameout and organizational rewards systems. Tropman served as the co-principal investigator on research grants funded by the Children's Bureau, the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute of Mental Health. He authored more than 50 scholarly articles and 45 books. Tropman was a Fulbright Lecturer in Social Change at the Kwansei Gakuin University in 1980 and a Fulbright Senior Specialist at the University of Melbourne in 2007. He has received many honors, including the Samuel Zell/Robert W. Lurie $25,000 Prize for the Teaching of Entrepreneurship, the School of Social Work's Distinguished Professor Award and the Association for Community Organization and Social Administration's Lifetime Achievement Award. He was named a fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare in 2014.

Kenneth E. Warner, Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor of Public Health and professor of health management and policy, School of Public Health, May 31, 2017. Warner received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968 from Dartmouth College and his Master of Philosophy degree and Ph.D. from Yale University in 1970 and 1974, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1972, and served as dean of the School of Public Health from 2005 to 2010. Warner earned an international reputation as the leading economist researching tobacco and health policy. His compelling research agenda covered the behavioral and health effects of the antismoking campaigns, the health consequences of cigarette taxation, the impact of declining tobacco consumption on state and national employment and the future of nicotine delivery. Warner's many public service contributions included serving as the senior scientific editor of the 25th Anniversary Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health and as the World Bank's representative to the negotiations that produced the first global health treaty known as the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Warner received numerous awards, including the Doll-Wynder Award from the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco in 2017.

Marina v.N. Whitman, professor of business administration and public policy, Stephen M. Ross School of Business; and professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, May 31, 2017. Whitman received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1956 from Radcliffe College and her Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Columba University in 1959 and 1962, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty as a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Business Administration and Public Policy in 1992. Whitman established her academic reputation in the late 1960s and early 1970s with her writings in the fields of international macroeconomics and finance. This important work addressed the difficult problems of using monetary and fiscal policies to achieve both an optimal balance of low unemployment and low inflation, while at the same time avoiding balance of payments deficits. Her strong academic reputation led to her position as a member of the President's Council of Economic Advisors, and that led to her long career with General Motors. There, her scholarship continued, with more articles and books on international trade, investment, exchange rates and macroeconomic performance. Her experience at General Motors and on various corporate boards informed her subsequent writings that included a special focus on corporate social responsibility. 

Jean D. Wineman, professor of architecture, A. Alfred College of Architecture and Urban Planning, May 31, 2017. Wineman received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971 from Wellesley College and her Master of Urban Planning degree and her Doctor of Architecture degree from U-M in 1973 and 1977, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 2000. At various points during her career at U-M, she served as the associate dean for research and as chair of the doctoral program in architecture. Wineman is an internationally recognized architectural researcher with special expertise in environmental programming, design and evaluation. Her scholarship, research and teaching explored the links between visual and spatial properties of architecture and behavioral and educational outcomes. Her recent research and scholarship have revealed the role spatial and visual relations play in residential satisfaction and behavior in urban contexts, in educational outcomes in zoos and museums, and in support of work performance, communication and innovation. Wineman authored, co-authored or edited more than 50 publications and proceedings, and she has received more than $6.7 million in research funding. She is a principal investigator of the National Science Foundation-funded Spatial and Social Networks in Organizational Innovation project and a co-principal investigator of the National Institutes of Health-funded Healthy Environments Partnership: Lean & Green in Motown.

Andrew E. Yagle, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, College of Engineering, May 31, 2017. Yagle received his Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree in 1977 and his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree in 1978 from U-M. He received his Master of Science degree, his Electrical Engineer degree and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1981, 1982 and 1985, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1985. Yagle co-authored the textbook "Engineering Signals and Systems," which has been used at Michigan and at engineering institutions across the country. Yagle served as a member of the College of Engineering's Admissions Committee, as chief program adviser for the Electrical Engineering Program, and in support of the ABET accreditation process. He also served on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Signal Processing Society Board of Governors, on multiple technical committees within the IEEE SPS, and as an associate editor for various IEEE signal processing journals. During his career, Yagle received a number of awards, including the National Science Foundation's Presidential Young Investigator Award and the College of Engineering's Teaching Excellence Award.