University of Michigan
News for faculty, staff and retirees

April 25, 2019

Regents Roundup — May 2015

May 21, 2015

Regents Roundup — May 2015

Topic: Regents

The following items were approved by the Board of Regents on Thursday.

Temporary modular building planned at Mcity

The Mobility Transformation Center will install a 4,500-gross-square-foot temporary modular building at Mcity. The $1.7 million project will include site modifications and will be funded by the MTC. Construction is scheduled to be completed this summer.

Medical School plans renovations at 300 NIB

The Medical School will renovate approximately 12,900 gross square feet of unoccupied lab space on the ninth and 11th floors of the 300 North Ingalls Building to provide office space for the recently established Center for International Reproductive Health Training and for the Department of Learning Health Sciences. The $2.3 million project will be funded by the Medical School and is scheduled to be completed in the winter of 2016.

Budget revised for Nuclear Engineering Laboratory renovation

The Board of Regents approved increasing the budget for the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory Renovation project from $11.4 million to $12 million, and authorized issuing the project for bids and awarding construction contracts. The budget increase reflects the change in schedule and current construction market conditions due to needing final approval of the decommissioning of the Ford Nuclear Reactor from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission before beginning construction. The College of Engineering will fund the project, with construction now scheduled for completion in the spring of 2017.

Final approval received for new Biological Science Building

The new Biological Science Building project received its final approval with the regents’ authorization to issue bids and award construction contracts. The $261 million project will construct an approximately 300,000-gross-square-foot facility that will house research laboratories, offices, and classrooms for the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, the Anthropology, Natural History, Paleontology, and Zoology museums, and a portion of the Herbarium collection. The new building will be connected to the Life Sciences Institute Building to increase utilization of the LSI vivarium functions and loading dock. LSA and the Office of the Provost are funding the project, with construction scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2018.

University Hospital networking improvements planned

A $2.65 million project will upgrade the mechanical and electrical systems serving 24 communication closets at University Hospital to improve cooling and increase reliability of the data equipment to support patient care. The U-M Hospitals and Health Centers will fund the project, which is scheduled to be completed in the winter of 2016.

Improvements planned for Auxiliary Services Building 1

The roofing and air-handling units on the east portion of Auxiliary Services Building 1 will be replaced in a $1.42 million project funded by Procurement Services. Construction is scheduled to be completed next spring.

Academic calendar for 2017-18 approved

Classes for the fall semester 2017 will begin Sept. 5, the day after Labor Day, according to the calendar for the 2017-18 academic year approved May 21. Winter Commencement will be Dec. 17. The winter semester will begin Jan. 3, with Spring Commencement scheduled for April 28 at Michigan Stadium. Spring break in 2018 will run Feb. 24-March 4. The calendar meets all of the guiding principles outlined by the Office of the Provost. Fall semester will have 67 class days and winter semester will have 69.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments and promotions with tenure

Samer Mahdy Ali, associate professor of Near Eastern studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1.

David Dunning, professor of psychology, LSA, effective Sept. 1.

William J. Glover, associate professor of history, with tenure, LSA, effective Sept. 1.

Seth D. Guikema, associate professor of industrial and operations engineering, College of Engineering, effective Sept. 1.

Scott Pingel, associate professor of music, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective Sept. 1.

Heather A. Thompson, professor of Afroamerican and African studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1.

Pascal Van Hentenryck, professor of industrial and operations engineering, CoE, effective Sept. 1.

Named professorships

* Gordon L. Amidon, Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. Professor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, effective July 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2019.

* Dr. James R. Baker Jr., Ruth Dow Doan Professor of Biologic Nanotechnology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016.

* Wayne E. Baker, Robert P. Thome Professor of Business Administration, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

Joel D. Blum, Jerry Keeler Distinguished University Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, effective Sept. 1.

* Dr. Steven R., Buchman, M. Haskell Newman Collegiate Professor of Plastic Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Dr. Enrique Criado, John R. Pfeifer Collegiate Professor of Vascular Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

Steven T. Cundiff, Harrison M. Randall Collegiate Professor of Physics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Gerald, F. Davis, Wilbur K. Pierpont Collegiate Professor of Management, Ross School, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Dec. 31, 2020.

* Dr. Michael A. DiPietro, John F. Holt Collegiate Professor of Radiology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Dec. 31, 2016.

Stephen R. Forrest, Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering, effective Sept. 1.

Sharon C. Glotzer, John Werner Cahn Distinguished University Professor of Engineering, effective Sept. 1.

* James C. Hathaway, James E. and Sarah A. Degan Professor of Law, Law School, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2020.

* Dr. Peter K. Henke, Leland Ira Doan Research Professor of Vascular Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Donald J. Herzog, Edson R. Sunderland Professor of Law, Law School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Dr. James A. Knol, Cyrenus G. Darling, Sr., M.D. and Cyrenus G. Darling, Jr., M.D. Professor of Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016.

* Francine Lafontaine, William Davidson Professor of Business Administration, Ross School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Laura Lein, Katherine Reebel Collegiate Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work, effective Sept. 1, 2015-July 31, 2020.

* William S. Lovejoy, Raymond T.J. Perring Family Professor of Business Administration, Ross School, effective June 1, 2015-May 31, 2020.

* David M. Lubman, Maude T. Lane Professor of Surgical Immunology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Ormond A. MacDougald, John A. Faulkner Collegiate Professor of Physiology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Puneet Manchanda, Isadore and Leon Winkelman Professor of Retail Marketing, Ross School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

Tiya A. Miles, Mary Henrietta Graham Distinguished University Professor of African American Women’s History, effective Sept. 1.

Kanishka Misra, Sanford R. Robertson Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Ross School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016.

Mark E. Newman, Anatol Rapoport Distinguished University Professor of Physics, effective Sept. 1.

Dr. Asma Nusrat, Aldred S. Warthin Professor of Experimental Pathology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2019.

Gilbert S. Omenn, Harold T. Shapiro Distinguished University Professor of Medicine, effective Sept. 1.

Peter J. Polverini, Jonathan Taft Distinguished University Professor of Dentistry, effective Sept. 1.

* Donald H. Regan, William W. Bishop, Jr. Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Mathias W. Reimann, Hessel E. Yntema Professor of Law, Law School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Linda C. Samuelson, John A. Williams Collegiate Professor of Gastrointestinal Physiology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Dr. James C. Stanley, Marion and David Handleman Research Professor of Vascular Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016.

Ronald G. Suny, William H. Sewell, Jr. Distinguished University Professor of History, effective Sept. 1.

Sarah G. Thomason, Bernard Bloch Distinguished University Professor of Linguistics, effective Sept. 1.

Leigh Plunkett Tost, NBD Bancorp Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Ross School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2016.

* Dr. John J., Voorhees, Duncan O. and Ella M. Poth Distinguished Professor of Dermatology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Dr. Stewart C. Wang, Endowed Professor of Burn Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* Lois S. Weisman, Sarah Winans Newman Collegiate Professor in the Life Sciences, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020

Toni M. Whited, correction to title to Dale L. Dykema Professor of Business Administration, Ross School, effective Sept. 1.

* David, B. Wooten, Alfred L. Edwards Collegiate Professor, Ross School, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

Administrative appointments

Eric Barritt, associate vice president for medical development and alumni relations, U-M Health System, effective June 8.

* Timothy L. Colenback, assistant dean for student services, School of Social Work, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2020.

Anne L. Curzan, associate dean for humanities, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2015-June 30, 2018.

Karl Daubmann, associate dean for post-professional degrees and technology engagement, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2018.

Laura De Becker, Helmut and Candis Stern Curator of African Art, U-M Museum of Art, effective Aug. 17.

James G. DeVaney, title change to associate vice provost for digital education and innovation, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective June 1.

Charles R. Doering, director, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, LSA, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2019.

John S. Ellis, title change to associate dean for productions, programs and partnerships, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2018.

* Ronald M. Gilgenbach, chair, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, CoE, effective Sept. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

* John B. Godfrey, assistant dean for international education, Rackham School of Graduate Studies, effective Aug. 1, 2015-July 31, 2016.

Gottfried, J. Hagen, chair, Department of Near Eastern Studies, LSA, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2018.

* Cristina Moreiras-Menor, chair, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, LSA, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2018.

Kara M. Morgenstern, associate vice president and deputy general counsel, Office of the Vice President and General Counsel, effective June 1.

David L. Porter, chair, Department of English Language and Literature, LSA, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2018.

Douglas O. Richstone, associate dean for natural sciences, LSA, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2018.

* Alford A. Young Jr., chair, Department of Sociology, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2015-June 30, 2017.

Dearborn campus

* Mallory M. Simpson, vice chancellor for institutional advancement, Office of Institutional Advancement, effective July 1.

Flint campus

Douglas G. Knerr, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2020.

* Reappointments

Retirements

Daniel E. Atkins III, professor of information, School of Information, and professor of electrical engineering and computer science, CoE, effective May 31. He joined the University of Michigan faculty in 1972. Atkins was associate dean for research and graduate studies and interim dean of CoE, founding dean of SI, and associate vice president for research cyberinfrastructure in the Office of the Vice President for Research. His interdisciplinary accomplishments include the development of high-speed computer arithmetic used in processor chips and socio-technical systems that support routine global collaborations in science and engineering research. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering.

Mary Anne Carroll, professor of atmospheric, oceanic, and space sciences, CoE, and professor of earth and environmental sciences, LSA, effective May 31. She joined the faculty in 1992. She is a distinguished and internationally renowned scholar in the fields of atmospheric chemistry and atmosphere-biosphere interactions. She established and served as the director of the Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions and Transport. This collaborative and multi-university endeavor improved understanding of trace compounds in the environment. Carroll served as chair or member of more than 30 national committees including the National Science Foundation’s Atmospheric Science Facilities Assessment Committee.

Susan A. Clemen-Stone, associate professor of nursing in the School of Nursing, effective May 31. She joined the faculty in 1969. Clemen-Stone acted as interim director of the Division of Health Promotion and Risk Reduction Programs from 2002-04. Her research and teaching focused on community-based nursing practice, ethics in nursing practice, health care access, health policy, population-focused interventions and food insecurity issues. Clemen-Stone co-authored the groundbreaking textbook Comprehensive Family and Community Health Nursing: Family, Aggregate and Community Practice. She was awarded the Excellence in Nursing Education from the Rho Chapter of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing.

Nicholas F. Delbanco, Robert Frost Distinguished University Professor of English Language and Literature and professor of English language and literature, LSA, effective Dec. 31, 2014. An acclaimed novelist and literary critic, Delbanco authored a number of distinguished works of fiction and non-fiction which have received national and international praise. The long-term director of the MFA Program and the Hopwood Awards Program served as chair of the Fiction Panel for the National Book Awards, received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, and twice a National Endowment for the Arts Writing Fellowship. Delbanco has been a champion and role model for a generation of creative writers, MFA students and junior colleagues.

David W. Gidley, professor of physics, LSA, effective May 31. Gidley joined the faculty in 1982. A prominent physicist, he studied precision measurements of the singlet and triplet annihilation decay rates of the particle-antiparticle system called positronium. His research group has collaborated with a host of industrial partners to develop a new positronium probe of nanoporous thin films. They are being intensely pursued by the microelectronics industry as the next generation of dielectrics in high-speed devices.  Many of his students have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry. He was elected a fellow of the American Physical Society.

Brooks B. Hull, professor of economics in the College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, UM-Dearborn, effective April 30. He joined the UM-Dearborn faculty in 1981. Hull served as interim director of the Environmental Studies Program, associate dean of the College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, interim chair of the Department of Social Sciences, and director of the Master of Public Policy Program. Hull’s pioneering scholarly work lies at the intersection of economics and religion. His interdisciplinary work has been published in leading scholarly journals and journals more closely aligned with religious studies. He created and directed the university’s Center for Economics Education.

Dr. Michael M.E. Johns, interim executive vice president for medical affairs, Office of the President, and professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, Medical School, effective Feb. 28. He joined the faculty June 2, 2014. His career included service beginning in 1996 as executive vice president for health affairs and chief executive officer of the Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center at Emory University. He next served as Emory University’s fifth chancellor from 2007-12. Johns is widely renowned as a catalyst of new thinking in many areas of health policy and health professions education.

Rachel Kaplan, Samuel Trask Dana Professor of Environment and Behavior, professor of natural resources, School of Natural Resources and Environment, and professor of psychology, LSA, effective May 31. She joined the faculty in 1964. Kaplan is a leader in the field of environmental psychology, who sought to understand the role the environment plays in helping people become more reasonable, effective and psychologically healthy. Her scholarly publications include “With People in Mind: Design and Management of Everyday Nature.” Kaplan served on 73 doctoral committees and 52 master’s committees. She received the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies Distinguished Faculty Mentoring Award.

Noboru Kikuchi, Roger L. McCarthy Professor of Mechanical Engineering and professor of mechanical engineering, CoE, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1980. Kikuchi is a world-renowned scholar in adaptive finite element methods. Kikuchi developed the image-based computer-aided engineering methodology (CAE) and the first order analysis method for the CAE of automotive body structures. He has an exceptional publication record and served as president of the Toyota Research Institute of North America. His honors include the university’s Henry Russel Award, the CoE Distinguished Research Award and The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers Computational Mechanics Achievement Award.

Boklye Kim, research associate professor, radiology in the Medical School, effective May 12. She joined the faculty in 1995. Kim is a leading authority in the field of magnetic resonance imaging. Her work undertook the evaluation and validation of fMRI for clinical neurological applications in the pre-surgical evaluations of sensory, motor and language functions in epilepsy and brain tumor patients. She published numerous articles in the leading peer-reviewed journals, was a frequent presenter at national symposia, and was actively involved in three professional societies. Kim received the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine's Summa Cum Laude Merit Award in 2013.

Howard A. Kimeldorf, professor of sociology, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1985. A leading sociologist of 20th century American labor, Kimeldorf utilized archival research, theoretical synthesis and methodological inventiveness to study the relationship between patterned inequality and social change. Much of his research has focused on inequalities rooted in class, and how historical processes of working class formation have shaped the possibilities for collective action and protest. Kimeldorf’s honors and awards including the Society for the Study of Social Problems Outstanding Book Award for “Battling for American Labor: Wobblies, Craft Workers and the Making of the Union Movement.”

Neal M. Krause, Marshall H. Becker Collegiate Professor of Public Health and professor of health behavior and health education in the School of Public Health, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1986. Krause is a leader in the fields of health behavior and health education. He conducted the first nationwide survey that focused exclusively on the relationship between religion and health among the aging. Among his many honors are the Richard Kalish Innovative Publication Award from the Gerontological Society of America, the Gerontological Society of America’s Distinguished Career Contribution Award and the American Psychological Association's William C. Bier Award.

Jeffery M. Paige, professor of sociology, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1976. Paige is a leading authority on political sociology, revolution, Latin American studies, and Marxian social theory. His work “Coffee and Power: Revolution and the Rise of Democracy in Central America” showed that a focus on either political economy or culture alone cannot account for the transformation of elite ideology, and that revolution in Central America is deeply rooted in the personal, familial and class histories of the coffee elites. His work has helped to shape contemporary political sociology by infusing it with historical and economic analytical schemes.

Edward L. Parmentier, Arthur F. Thumau Professor, professor of music (harpsichord), and director of the Early Music Ensemble in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1976. Parmentier is a widely known harpsichordist with an extensive list of notable performances and recordings. He also conducted modern instrument chamber orchestras in performances of baroque and classical repertory. Parmentier achieved amazing results with his unique style of teaching. Within the boundaries of acceptable taste and judgment, he encouraged a wide latitude of possibilities. The success of many of his former students attest to the efficacy of his pedagogy.

Margaret Jane Radin, Hemy King Ransom Professor of Law and professor of law in the Law School, effective May 31. Radin served on the faculty of the University of Oregon, University of Southern California and Stanford University before joining the U-M faculty in 2007. She is a prolific and nationally renowned scholar in several fields of law including property theory, intellectual property and electronic commerce. She has published numerous books and scholarly articles, including “Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights, and the Rule of Law.” Radin was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Victor Rosenberg, associate professor of information, School of Information, effective May 31. Rosenberg served on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley before joining U-M’s faculty in 1977. His research focused on electronic commerce, entrepreneurship, information retrieval, information policy, technology in the humanities and the efficacy of Web-based games for teaching information literacy skills and concepts. He taught a range of courses and founded and served as the chief executive officer of Personal Bibliographic Software Inc. He received the Entrepreneur of the Year Award from the National Association of Venture Capital Clubs.

Leonard M. Sander, professor of physics and professor of complex systems, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1969. An internationally renowned physicist, Sander studied theoretical condensed matter physics, statistical physics and theoretical biophysics. His most influential work was the discovery and elucidation of diffusion limited aggregation, a random growth process with wide-ranging applicability in physical and biological systems. His paper on this topic, co-authored with T.A. Witten, is the ninth-most-cited paper in the premier physics journal Physical Review Letters. He served as the associate director of the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, and held several visiting positions overseas.

Rico F. Serbo, associate professor of music (voice) in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective May 31. Serbo joined the U-M faculty in 2004. Serbo captivated audiences around the world with the warmth and beauty of his lyric tenor. His extensive professional record includes national and international performances with a number of major orchestras and prestigious opera houses. Serbo consistently recruited some of the best voice students. He skillfully articulated his profound understanding of vocal technique to his dedicated students. He is the recipient of numerous honors including a Martha Baird Rockefeller Grant, the Kirsten Flagstad Award, and the Euterpe Opera Award.

Martha J. Sheil, associate professor of music (voice) in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective May 31. Sheil joined U-M in 1985. She began her career with the New York City Opera, made her professional debut in “Le Nozze di Figaro,” and sang 15 major roles during her six years with the company. Many of her former students have gone on to launch successful careers with the Metropolitan Opera, the Washington National Opera, the New York City Opera, and European opera houses in Bern and Prague. Sheil received the SMTD Harold Haugh Teaching Award in 2014.

Donald J. Sinta, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Earl V. Moore Professor of Music (Saxophone), and professor of music (saxophone), and All State Coordinator, in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, effective May 31. Sinta joined the faculty in 1974. He is a gifted soloist, dedicated clinician, and exceptional teacher. Sinta’s recording “American Music for the Saxophone” is known throughout the world. A group of students created the Donald Sinta Quartet to honor their professor and to recognize the fundamental impact he has made on their lives as artists. He received the SMTD Harold Haugh Award for excellence in teaching.

Fred E. Williams, professor of operations management in the School of Management, UM-Flint, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1998. Williams served as dean of the UM-Flint School of Management (1998-2003). He obtained funding from the U.S. Information Agency to support the development of partnership activities between the UM-Flint School of Management and the International Academy of Business and Banking in Togliatti, Russia. His publications have appeared in Decision Sciences, Management Science, and The Review of Economic Studies. Williams served on committees including the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee, the Committee on the Economic Status of the Faculty, the Faculty Council, and the Strategic Planning Committee.

David G. Winter, professor of psychology, LSA, effective May 31. He joined the faculty in 1988. Winter studied the impact of power, affiliation and achievement motivation in world leaders, including U.S. presidents, demonstrating that the expression of motives in speeches and other documents predicted important outcomes, including waging war and peace. He authored and co-authored influential books and was active in the International Society for Political Psychology, which he served as president. He received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology’s Henry A. Murray Award, and the International Society of Political Psychology's Harold Lasswell Award.