University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

October 18, 2018

Regents Roundup — February 2018

February 15, 2018

Regents Roundup — February 2018

Topic: Regents

The following items were approved by the Board of Regents at its meeting Thursday:

Renovations planned for Art and Architecture Building

The two-story Work Commons gallery space in the Art and Architecture Building will be renovated and divided to create a new floor level of approximately 5,500 gross square feet to house studios, workshops, and seminar rooms for the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design. The project is estimated to cost $3.4 million and will be funded from Stamps School gifts and resources and Office of the Provost resources. Construction is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2018.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

K. Rivet Amico, associate professor of health behavior and health education, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

**Bènèdicte Boisseron, associate professor of Afroamerican and African studies, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

**Dana Dolinoy Cipolla, professor of environmental health sciences and professor of nutritional sciences, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

**Marisa C. Eisenberg, associate professor of epidemiology, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Diane M. Harper, professor of family medicine, Medical School, effective Feb. 1, 2018.

Leslie Herrenkohl, professor of education, School of Education, effective Sept. 1, 2018.

Simon P. Hogan, professor of pathology, Medical School, effective March 1, 2018.

Earl Lewis, professor of history and professor of Afroamerican and African studies, LSA, effective March 19, 2018.

Brian J. Zink, professor of emergency medicine, Medical School, effective Feb. 1, 2018.

Named professorships

Eric F. Bell, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2018.

Jason P. De León, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2018.

Dee E. Fenner, Bates Professor of Diseases of Women and Children, Medical School, effective Feb. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Simon P. Hogan, Askwith Research Professor of Food Allergy, Medical School, effective March 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2021.

Mikhail Krutikov, Preston R. Tisch Professor of Judaic Studies, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Jason P. McCormick, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2018.

Ellen H. Rowe, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2018.

Katsuyo S. Thornton, L.H. and F.E. Van Vlack Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Dominika K. Zgid, Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2020.

Paul M. Zimmerman, William R. Roush Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2020.

Administrative appointments

Patrice S. Beddor, acting chair, Department of Linguistics, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through June 30, 2018.

Ethriam Cash Brammer, assistant dean, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, effective Feb. 23, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

*Anne L. Curzan, associate dean for humanities, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019.

Lawrence G. Getz, chair, Naval Officer Education Program, effective June 1, 2018 through May 31, 2021.

**William W. King, assistant vice president for research – animal resources, U-M Office of Research, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Dearborn campus

Ilir Miteza, change in title to associate provost for graduate, global and digital education, Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2020.

Mitchel A. Sollenberger, change in title to associate vice provost for undergraduate education and student success, Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through June 30, 2020.

Flint campus

*Margaret M. Andrews, interim dean, School of Nursing, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2018.

Rajib Ganguly, interim chair, Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Physics, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Janet E. Haley, acting chair, Department of Theatre and Dance, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through May 31, 2018.

*Reappointments

**Interim approval granted

Retirements

Francis X. Blouin Jr., professor of information, School of Information, and professor of history, LSA, Dec. 31, 2017. Blouin received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1967 from the University of Notre Dame, and his Master of Arts and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota in 1969 and 1978, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1977. He held a number of positions in the Bentley Historical Library, including acting assistant director and director. Blouin played an instrumental role in the development of a program in archival administration that challenged the intellectual as well as administrative boundaries of the idea of archives. Blouin led a collaborative endeavor to apply modern archival descriptive methods to improve intellectual access to the Vatican archives, the results of which were published in "Vatican Archives: An Inventory and Guide to Historical Documentation of the Holy See." He helped lead a yearlong seminar titled "Archives, Documentation, and Institutions of Social Memory," which critically examined the idea of the archive as a historical source and its relationship to its administration and cultural context. Blouin participated on a number of boards and commissions, including the Council on Library and Information Resources and the State of Michigan Historical Records Advisory Board.

Kathleen M. Canning, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Sonya O. Rose Collegiate Professor of History, professor of history, professor of women’s studies, and professor of Germanic languages and literature, LSA, Jan. 2, 2018. Canning received her Ph.D. degree from The Johns Hopkins University in 1988, and she joined the U-M faculty that year. She is a pre-eminent scholar in the fields of modern German and European history, gender history, and histories of citizenship and political subjectivity. Her first book, "Languages of Labor and Gender: Female Factory Work in Germany, 1850-1914," broke new ground for European social history of the time. Its crucial contribution was to move beyond the adversarial differences of social and cultural historians to show how "materialist" and "discursive" approaches might join together. She followed this with, "Gender History in Practice: Historical Perspectives on Body, Class and Citizenship," likewise a benchmark volume. Her co-edited volume, "Weimar Subjects/Weimar Publics," has shaped the ways in which early 20th century German history is now being addressed. Canning was a mentor to a generation of students in history and women's studies. She served as chair of the Department of History, director of the Eisenberg Institute of Historical Studies and founding director of the Center for European Studies.

Lorraine M. Fig, clinical professor of radiology in the Medical School and staff physician in the Nuclear Medicine Service at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Jan. 31, 2018. She received her Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery degree in 1973 from the University of Cape Town Medical School and her Master of Public Health degree in 1985 from U-M. She joined the U-M faculty in 1991, and served as the associate program director of the Nuclear Medicine Residency Program from 2004 to 2010. Fig’s research focused on the use of nuclear medicine in evaluating patients with endocrine disease, and she played an instrumental role in the training and development of a generation of medical students, residents and fellows. Fig served the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education as a board member of the Nuclear Medicine Residency Review Committee and as chair of the Milestone Project for Nuclear Medicine. She was an item writer for the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board’s Nuclear Medicine Advanced Associate Examination. Fig was involved in a number of organizations, including the American College of Nuclear Medicine and the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission. She helped found the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's Curie Fund to advance women into leadership roles.

Peter A. Granda, archivist in the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, Institute for Social Research, Nov. 3, 2017. Granda received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Fairleigh Dickinson University in 1969, his Master of Arts degree from Kansas State University in 1974, and his Ph.D. degree from U-M in 1984. He joined U-M as a data archive specialist in 1985, and he served as associate director of the ICPSR from 2013 to 2017. Granda advised social science data repositories around the world on best archival practices, and played a key role in many initiatives, with a focus on those related to comparative research and data harmonization. Granda served as the director of data processing for the National Survey of Family Growth. He was also the co-principal investigator of the Integrated Fertility Survey Series, an effort to harmonize decades of data on fertility in the U.S., and he participated in the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys project, which resulted in a harmonized dataset used to investigate cultural and ethnic influences on mental health. With colleagues in Cologne, Germany, he established a partnership to process and distribute the Eurobarometer surveys for secondary analysis. Granda also served as the principal investigator and director of the Health and Medical Care Archive.

Paul R. Lichter, professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences in the Medical School, Jan. 31, 2018. Lichter received his Bachelor of Arts degree, medical degree and Master of Science degree from U-M in 1960, 1964 and 1968, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1971. Lichter grew the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences twelvefold in faculty and thirtyfold in staff before stepping down as chair in 2012. As the founding director, he played an instrumental leadership role in the success and construction of the W.K. Kellogg Eye Center and the Brehm Tower. Lichter is a leader in the field of glaucoma research. He led the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study, which was conducted at 14 medical centers across the country. The study concluded that patients with more advanced disease at the time of diagnosis fared better with initial surgery compared to initial medication therapy, a finding that continues to influence contemporary approaches to treating glaucoma. Lichter played a critical role in collaborations that identified glaucoma-related genetic mutations in juvenile glaucoma, Nail-Patella Syndrome, and genomewide association studies. He published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles, 75 editorials, 60 abstracts, 20 book chapters and one book. Lichter served as president of many organizations, including the Academia Ophthalmologica Internationalis and the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Betsy Lozoff, professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases, Medical School; professor of environmental health sciences, School of Public Health; and research professor, Center for Human Growth and Development, Jan. 15, 2018. Lozoff received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1965 from Radcliffe College and her medical degree and Master of Science degree from Case Western Reserve University in 1971 and 1981, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1993 and served as director of the Center for Human Growth and Development from 1993 to 2004. Lozoff’s research career focused primarily on the brain and behavioral effects of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia during early development. She was the principal investigator for the university’s first National Institutes of Health Minority International Research Training Grant. Lozoff authored 135 peer-reviewed publications and published 16 book chapters. She served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and Infancy. Lozoff was a reviewer for the NIH Human Development and Aging Study Section, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Maternal and Child Health Research Committee and a number of other funding entities. She mentored a generation of scholars, postdoctoral fellows, medical students, residents and fellows from pediatrics and other disciplines.

Eric W. Young, professor of internal medicine and assistant dean in the Medical School, Jan. 20, 2018. Young received his Bachelor of Science degree, medical degree and Master of Science degree from U-M in 1977, 1981 and 1993, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1990, and held several leadership positions, including director of clinical research in the Division of Nephrology, assistant dean for veterans affairs in the Medical School, and chief of staff of the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. Young is recognized as an international leader in renal epidemiology with special expertise in outcomes research in dialysis and transplantation. His work explored the epidemiologic and clinical aspects of chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease. One of his most important efforts has been in the organization and development of the international Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study. This outcomes project has led to many important observations regarding dialysis practices around the world. He served on the editorial boards of Clinical Nephrology and the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Young held a number of significant leadership roles, including chair of the Professional Services Board and the Clinical Executive Board. He also served as an active member of the Executive Leadership Board, the Dean’s Committee, the Bed Utilization Committee and the VISN 11 Clinical Leadership Board.