University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

June 25, 2018

Regents Roundup — December 2015

December 17, 2015

Regents Roundup — December 2015

Topic: Regents

The following items were approved by the Board of Regents at its meeting Thursday. 

NCRC building to house university collections

North Campus Research Complex Building 550 will be renovated to create efficient storage spaces for various university collections currently housed on campus and in leased space, and collection processing space. The $3.8 million project will be funded by the Office of the Provost and is scheduled for completion in the winter of 2017.

Regents approve design for clinical pathology lab project

The Board of Regents approved the design for the U-M Hospitals and Health Centers Clinical Pathology Laboratories Relocation and Renovation project. Approximately 186,000 gross square feet of space will be renovated within North Campus Research Complex Buildings 30, 35, 36 and 60, as well as University Hospital and University Hospital South to enhance the clinical lab functions necessary to meet present and future growth in test volumes, improve operational efficiency, and reduce the expense from having labs in their current locations. Hospitals and Health Centers' resources are funding the $160 million project that is scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2019.

Athletics team center project moves forward

Regents voted to seek bids for the Stephen M. Ross Athletic Campus Athletics South Competition and Performance Project. The project will construct a performance team center to become the home for men's and women's track and field, cross country, and lacrosse, and women's rowing. The project also includes indoor and outdoor track competition venues and a lacrosse stadium. Athletic Department resources and gifts are funding the $168 million project, with construction scheduled for completion in the winter of 2018.

New transportation facility receives final approval

A project that will construct a new operations and maintenance building on North Campus to replace the existing facility received its final approval. The new facility will accommodate larger buses and heavy equipment, and its location is expected to save the university approximately $400,000 per year in operating expenses by reducing the number of miles buses spend out of service getting onto their routes. Parking resources will fund the $38.5 million project that is scheduled to be completed in the winter of 2018.

Tunnels to be reinforced

Approximately 600 feet of university utility tunnel near the School of Dentistry will be reinforced to withstand the heavy loads of emergency vehicles to create designated fire truck access. The project also includes tunnel waterproofing, addition of a ventilation system, and restoration of paving and landscaping disturbed by the construction. Utility resources will fund the $2.4 million project scheduled for completion in the fall of 2017.

Central Power Plant equipment to be upgraded

Approximately 1,800 gross square feet of space at the Central Power Plant's Central Switching Station will be renovated to replace the existing switchgear for major electrical power distribution that has exceeded its useful life with new equipment incorporating the latest technology and safety features. The project is estimated to cost $1.925 million, to be funded from Utility resources, and is scheduled to be completed next fall.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments and promotions with tenure

Jeffrey McCullough, associate professor of health management and policy, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1.

Alison Miller, associate professor of health behavior and health education, SPH, effective Jan. 1.

Named professorships

*Dr. David A. Bloom, Jack Lapides Professor of Urology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

*Michael J. Cafarella, Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Dec. 31, 2017.

*Karen B. Farris, Charles R. Walgreen III Professor of Pharmacy Administration, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Dec. 31, 2020.

Susan A. Gelman, correction to title as Heinz Werner Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and Linguistics, effective Feb. 1, 2016.

Janean E. Holden, Barbara A. Therrien Collegiate Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, effective Dec. 1, 2015-Nov. 30, 2020.

Honglak Lee, Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, CoE, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Dec. 31, 2017.

Dr. Lona Mody, Amanda Sanford Hickey Collegiate Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

*Kenneth Resnicow, Irwin M. Rosenstock Collegiate Professor of Public Health, SPH, effective Feb. 1, 2016-Jan. 31, 2021.

Patrick D. Schloss, Frederick Novy Collegiate Professor of Microbiome Research, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

*Steven P. Schwendeman, Ara G. Paul Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Dec. 31, 2020.

John R. Traynor, Edward F. Domino Research Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

*Dr. James O. Woolliscroft, Lyle C. Roll Professor of Medicine, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2015-Aug. 31, 2020.

Administrative appointments

*William J. Adams, chair, Department of Economics, LSA, effective July 1, 2015-June 30, 2016.

*Damian R. Beil, interim associate dean for graduate programs, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Jan. 1, 2016-June 30, 2016.

*David T. Burke, interim chair, Department of Human Genetics, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2016.

*Maureen A. Coerdt, assistant dean for administration and student services, School of Nursing, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Dec. 31, 2019.

Amy K. Dittmar, vice provost for academic and budgetary affairs, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Dec. 31, 2020.

*George A. Garcia, chair, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2016-June 30, 2018.

*Janean E. Holden, associate dean for research, School of Nursing, effective Jan.1, 2016-June 30, 2019.

*Steven P. Schwendeman, chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2016-June 30, 2017.

*Karen S. Strandholm, chair, Department of Management Studies, Ross School, effective Jan. 1, 2016-July 31, 2019.

Michaela T. Zint, acting associate dean for academic affairs, School of Natural Resources and Environment, effective Jan. 1, 2016-Aug. 31, 2016.

*Reappointments

Flint campus

Douglas G. Knerr, professor of history, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1.

John S. Ellis, interim chair, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1-June 30, 2016.

Jessica L. Kelts, interim chair, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1-June 30, 2016.

Shelby Newport, chair, Department of Theatre and Dance, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2016-June 30, 2019.

Retirements

Stephen C. Bayne, Marcus L. Ward Professor of Dentistry and professor of dentistry in the School of Dentistry, effective Jan. 1. He joined the faculty as a professor and chair of the Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences and Endodontics in 2006. He was named the Marcus L. Ward Professor of Dentistry in 2011. Bayne is internationally recognized for his transformational leadership roles in dental research, expertise in traditional materials engineering, and clinical research in restorative dental materials. He was co-founder of the journal Dental Materials and received the American Dental Education Association/GlaxoSmithKline Sensodyne Excellence in Teaching Award.

Paul R. Berman, professor of physics, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1993. A renowned physicist, Berman studied theoretical atomic, molecular and optical physics. One major outcome of his spectroscopy work was the development of the modified optical Bloch equations, which continue to be used today for describing the interaction of light with matter. Berman co-authored the essential textbook "Principles of Laser Spectroscopy and Quantum Optics," developed a number of interdisciplinary courses, and inspired a generation of undergraduate and graduate students. He was elected a fellow of the American Physical Society and the Optical Society of America.

Dr. Susan G. Blitz, clinical assistant professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, effective Dec. 31. She joined the faculty in 1983. An exemplary clinician, teacher and leader, Blitz directed a team dedicated to the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of occupational illnesses and injuries for the university's 40,000 employees. She held key leadership positions including medical director of the Employee Health Service, VA Medical Center-Ann Arbor, and medical director of the Taubman General Medicine Primary Care Clinics, UMHS. She promoted positive health behaviors for the university's employee wellness programs and received the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners State Award for Excellence.

Dr. Macdonald Dick II, professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases in the Medical School effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1977. An exceptional pediatric cardiologist, his studies included the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the clinical course and outcome of cardiac arrhythmias in the young. His clinical work focused on pediatric electrophysiology. He published 153 peer-reviewed publications and wrote 38 book chapters. Dick held key leadership positions including director of the Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program and associate chair for faculty affairs. He received the Pediatric and Congenital Electrocardiography Society's Lifetime Achievement Award and the American Academy of Pediatrics' Founder's Award from the Section of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery.

John V.A. Fine Jr., professor of history, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1969. His pioneering monographs include "The Bosnian Church: A New Interpretation" and "When Ethnicity Did Not Matter in the Balkans: A Study of Identity in Pre-Nationalist Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia in the Medieval and Early-Modern Periods." Fine was elected a member of the U.S. National Committee on Byzantine Studies. He was honored by his former students with a tribute and symposium in 2007. His honors included a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, the University of Michigan Press Book Award and the Department of History's Hudson Research Professorship.

Anthony H. Francis, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and professor of chemistry, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1975. Francis' research focused on energy transport, charge transport and electronic relaxation processes in semiconductors and organic materials. His research on semi-conducting solids with layered crystal structures has technological applications in battery electrodes, and thermoelectric and electrochromic devices. Francis held key leadership positions including LSA associate dean for research, computing and facilities; LSA associate dean for research and graduate studies; associate vice president for research; and LSA associate dean for budget. His efforts have improved the administration of research activities and expanded the university's research enterprise.

Allan F. Gibbard, Richard B. Brandt Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and professor of philosophy, LSA, effective Dec. 31. Gibbard joined the faculty in 1977. He is one of the most influential moral philosophers in the world. His main works in moral theory include "Reconciling Our Aims: In Search of Bases for Ethics." Gibbard also made important contributions in the philosophy of language, and proved the Gibbard-Satterthwaite theorem, which demonstrates the susceptibility of most voting rules to strategic voting. Among many honors, he is one of only two philosophers to be elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Andrew J. Haig, professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the Medical School, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1996. He is a leader in the fields of back pain and the paraspinal muscles, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, leadership development and global health policy. His clinical work focused on spinal disorders and electrodiagnostic testing in areas from sports medicine to pediatric rehabilitation. A prolific author, his honors include young investigator awards from the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine. He founded the University of Michigan Spine Fellowship, considered a top fellowship programs in the country.

Jerome Johnston, research professor, Research Center for Group Dynamics in the Institute for Social Research and research professor, Educational Studies in the School of Education, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1972. Johnston's scholarly work focused on how learning is shaped by the dynamic interaction between the design of electronic materials and the factors associated with their use. Johnston served as the principal investigator for 17 major research projects, and authored numerous scholarly publications. His key leadership positions included director of the Project IDEAL Support Center and director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics. His awards include the International Society of Technology in Education's Technology Director of the Year Award.

Dr. Charles F. Koopmann Jr., professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery and professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases in the Medical School, effective Dec. 31. He joined the U-M faculty in 1986. He is a leader in the field of otolaryngology with special expertise in the care of pediatric patients. In the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, he served as director of the Pediatric Division and associate chair. Under his leadership the pediatric otolaryngology section became nationally known for exceptional patient care and more. Koopmann was a prolific author and shared time and insights with university committees including the Advisory Board on Intercollegiate Athletics and the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs.

Louis E. Loeb, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and professor of philosophy, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1974. A leading scholar of modern philosophy, his writings included the seminal book "From Descartes to Hume: Continental Metaphysics and the Development of Modern Philosophy." Loeb promoted a culture of education within the Department of Philosophy, both as a legendary lecturer and as the department chair. Colleagues credit Loeb's brilliant instruction in gateway courses for the large number of philosophy concentrators and minors. As department chair, Loeb oversaw a major reorganization of the undergraduate curriculum and graduate program. He won the American Philosophical Association's Patrick Romanell Prize.

Juan E. Mestas, chancellor emeritus and professor of foreign languages in the College of Arts and Sciences, UM-Flint, effective Dec. 31. He joined UM-Flint as chancellor and professor of foreign languages in 1999. He served as chancellor until 2007 and joined the Department of Foreign Languages faculty full-time in 2009. Mestas brought greater transparency and accountability to administrative decision-making, new approaches to increase enrollment, and addressed structural funding issues. He helped establish the Women's Educational Center, Doctor of Physical Therapy program and more. Mestas' scholarly work includes three books among other writings. Mestas has bequest $2 million to UM-Flint to ensure access, opportunity and student success.

Regina Morantz-Sanchez, professor of history and professor of Judaic studies, LSA, effective Dec. 31. She joined the faculty in 1994. Morantz-Sanchez published the path-breaking essay "The Perils of Feminist History" one year after the inaugural Berkshire Conference on the History of Women in 1973. Her scholarship played a crucial role in bringing gender and women's history into the history of medicine field. Her course History of the Family brought the revisionist scholarship of gender and women's history into the undergraduate classroom. Highlights of her extraordinary service record include contributions as a faculty associate in American culture, women's studies and Judaic studies. Her honors include the Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award.

Karen L. Morgan, librarian in the Mardigian Library, UM-Dearborn, effective Oct. 1. She joined the U-M faculty as an assistant librarian in 1990. As UM-Dearborn's first campus archivist, Morgan has been responsible for developing and managing the campus archives since 2001. Morgan played an instrumental role in managing the archives of Henry Ford Estate-Fairlane and assembling archival materials for the UM-Dearborn's 50th anniversary project in 2009. Her writings include a biography on American humorist Anne Warner featured in the Dictionary of Literary Biography. She was actively involved in professional organizations including the Society of American Archivists.

Harold W. Neighbors, professor of health behavior and health education in the School of Public Health; research professor, Research Center for Group Dynamics; and adjunct research professor, Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research in the Institute for Social Research, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1985. Neighbors' research explored areas including health equity and racial and ethnic health disparities. He played instrumental leadership and founding roles in the Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health; the Program for Research on Black Americans; and the Paul B. Comely Postdoctoral Program for Minority Scholars. Neighbors received several diversity awards including the Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award.

Ronald A. Nussbaum, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and curator, Museum of Zoology, LSA, effective Dec. 31. Nussbaum joined the faculty in 1974. He served as director of the university's E.S. George Reserve from 1982-2006. Nussbaum's research explored the systematics, evolution and ecology of amphibians and reptiles around the world. He also studied the evolution of parental care, parental investment, demography and life history strategies. His explorations have led to the addition of more than 36,000 amphibian and reptile specimens and records to the Museum of Zoology's collections. He served on a number of committees including the University Committee on the Use and Care of Animals.

Bruce A. Rubenstein, David M. French Professor and professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences, UM-Flint, effective Dec. 31. He joined the UM-Flint faculty in 1974. Rubenstein earned statewide and national recognition for three books on Michigan history. They included "Michigan: A History of the Great Lakes State" (2014), used in university courses throughout the state. Rubenstein also wrote "Chicago in the World Series, 1903-2006: The Cubs and White Sox in Championship Play," scholarly articles, book reviews and was a frequent invited presenter. He held several administrative positions including chair of the Department of History.

Rob Van der Voo, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Frank H. T. Rhodes Collegiate Professor of Geological Sciences and professor of earth and environmental sciences, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1970. His research combined geophysics and tectonics. He also studied the theoretical and historical aspects of Earth's magnetic field. He served as chair of the Department of Geological Sciences for 11 years and director of the LSA Honors Program for five years. He was involved in professional associations including the American Geophysical Union and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. His awards included the university's Henry Russel Award and the Franklin Institute's Benjamin Franklin Medal in Earth Sciences.

John H.F. Woodrooffe, research scientist, vehicle safety analysis in the U-M Transportation Research Institute, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 2003. Woodrooffe served as director of UMTRI's Commercial Vehicle Research and Policy Program and head of UMTRI's Vehicle Safety Analytics group. He is an international expert in vehicle-related research, large vehicle stability and control, transport safety, efficiency, vehicle productivity, fuel use and environmental impact. His latest research focused on the effectiveness of crash avoidance and connected vehicle technologies. Woodrooffe received the Commemorative Medal for the 125th Anniversary of Canadian Confederation for contributions to the National Research Council of Canada.