University of Michigan
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August 19, 2018

Don't Miss: Science Cafe: Wolves, People and Policy

April 11, 2014

Don't Miss: Science Cafe: Wolves, People and Policy

Once federally protected and now hunted, wolves in Michigan have been called fascinating and controversial.

Joseph Bump will discuss wolf biology and regional wolf-human conflict from 5:30-7:30 p.m. April 16 at Conor O'Neill's Traditional Irish Pub, 318 S. Main Street. (Photo courtesy of Joseph Bump.)

University of Michigan alumnus Joseph Bump studies large carnivore ecology as assistant professor of animal ecology & conservation in Michigan Technological University’s School of Forest Resources & Environmental Science. He will discuss wolf biology and regional wolf-human conflict from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Conor O’Neill’s Traditional Irish Pub, 318 S. Main Street.

 “One of the aspects of wolves that is fascinating to me is the range and strength of reactions they elicit in humans. We love them, we hate them, but rarely are we indifferent towards them. In comparison to wolves, much wildlife is relatively ignored,” Bump says.

Wolves are smart, curious, and highly social — all attributes that favored their being the first domesticated animal, as dogs are descendants of wolves. He says regional wolf-human conflict centers on wolves killing livestock and pets, and how we respond.

“The relationship between wolves and ravens is also intriguing, and so is how differently wolves react to foxes vs. coyotes. Wolves kill coyotes but tolerate foxes,” Bump says.

The program is part of the Museum of Natural History’s Science Cafe series. Hors d’oeuvres are at 5:30 p.m. and the program is from 6-7:30 p.m.