University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

June 22, 2018

Andrea J. Ritchie to discuss police violence against women of color

January 8, 2018

Andrea J. Ritchie to discuss police violence against women of color

Special section

Topic: Campus News

Author, advocate and police misconduct attorney Andrea J. Ritchie will discuss how women of color experience brutality at the hands of law enforcement as part of the 2018 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium.

Presented by the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Ritchie's discussion will begin at 6 p.m. Jan. 18 in the Hatcher Graduate Library gallery. The event is free and open to the public.

Andrea Ritchie

For her talk, Ritchie will draw on her 2017 book, "Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color."

Ritchie's writing, litigation and advocacy has centered on the policing of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people of color for the past two decades.

She is currently Researcher-in-Residence on Race, Gender, Sexuality and Criminalization at the Barnard Center for Research on Women's Social Justice Institute. She previously served as a Senior Soros Justice Fellow at the Open Society Foundations.

Ritchie is the co-author of "Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women," and "Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States."

She has been invited to testify before the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, the White House Council on Women and Girls, the Prison Rape Elimination Commission and several United Nations treaty bodies.

Ritchie coordinates the policing subgroup of the LGBT Federal Criminal Justice Working Group and served as co-chair of the Anti-Violence/Criminal Justice Working Group of the New York City Council's Young Women's Initiative.

"Andrea Ritchie's talk centers women of color in the problem of police violence, which is much more often framed as something that happens between men," IRWG Director Anna Kirkland said. "Her talk will add more complexity to our understanding of the scope of the problem of police violence and its gendered and racialized dimensions."