University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

March 18, 2018

Old School

December 4, 2017

Albert H. Wheeler

Albert H. Wheeler was the first African-American professor to earn tenure at U-M and was an advocate for civil rights, culminating in his election as Ann Arbor's first black mayor.

November 20, 2017

Winning with wings

The U-M football team's iconic winged helmet made its debut in a 1938 game against Michigan State University, which the Wolverines won 14-0.

November 13, 2017

Great War campus life

During World War I, the university erected makeshift buildings to accommodate the wartime population influx, including this mess hall attached to the Michigan Union.

November 6, 2017

First athletic championship

In 1901, football coach Fielding H. Yost commanded his "Point-a-Minute" Wolverines to outscore opponents 501-0. The team went on to triumph over Stanford 49-0 in the first college football bowl game ever played, the Rose Bowl.

October 30, 2017

Breaking boundaries

In 1955, Rhoda Reddig Russell became the university's first female academic dean when she was named to lead the School of Nursing.

October 23, 2017

Crossing the medical frontier

In 1869, U-M turned a former professor's house into the first hospital owned and operated by a university.

October 16, 2017

A branch of connection

Two U-M trees — one on the Medical Campus and one at the North Campus Research Complex — have ties to the tree under which Greek physician Hippocrates allegedly sat centuries ago.

October 9, 2017

From France to U-M's founding

After fleeing the French Revolution in the late 1700s, Father Gabriel Richard came to the United States and eventually made his way to Detroit, where he helped found U-M.

October 2, 2017

The legacy of a flagpole

The flagpole on the Diag can trace its roots back to one of the most historic celebrations of the 19th century — the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition.

September 25, 2017

From car bans to driverless vehicles

While U-M is a major research site for auto innovation, cars were not always welcome on the university's campus. In 1925, President Clarence Cook Little instituted a partial, then total ban on student automobiles, which drew protests and attempts to circumvent the rules.