University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

January 18, 2017

Regents Roundup — December 2016

December 8, 2016

Regents Roundup — December 2016

Topic: Regents

The following items were approved by the Board of regents at its meeting Thursday.

Improvements planned for Law Quad

A project at the university's iconic Law Quad will refurbish the exterior building lights at all entrances, install new light poles, replace walkways with bluestone pavers and upgrade underground utilities. Utility resources and investment proceeds will fund the project that is estimated to cost $6.2 million, with work scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2017.

Renovations slated for Revelli Hall

A $1.9 million project at the William D. Revelli Band Rehearsal Hall will renovate approximately 6,100 gross square feet of space to expand restroom capacity, improve the ventilation and air conditioning systems, and repair or replace interior and exterior elements of the building that have deteriorated. The project will be funded from investment proceeds and is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2017.

Two projects planned at University Hospital

A new magnetic resonance imaging scanner will replace a unit being decommissioned at University Hospital. A renovation of approximately 1,100 gross square feet on Level B2 will accommodate the new scanner. Hospitals and Health Centers' resources will fund the $4.9 million project that is slated for completion in the fall of 2017.

A $1.2 million project will replace the material lifts that connect the University Hospital operating rooms and its Central Sterile Processing Department to improve system reliability. The project will be funded from Hospitals and Health Centers' resources and is scheduled for completion in the spring of 2018.

Project planned at Frankel CVC

A project will renovate approximately 900 gross square feet of the Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center to replace an existing electrophysiology laboratory with upgraded imaging technology to improve patient safety, room function and utilization. The $4.2 million project is being funded by the Hospitals and Health Centers and is scheduled to be completed next summer.

Renovations planned at Children's and Women's Hospitals

The Central Sterile Processing Department at the C.S. Mott Children's and Von Voigtlander Women's Hospitals facility will undergo a renovation of approximately 3,700 gross square feet to improve process flow and enhance efficiency. The $1.1 million project will be funded from Hospitals and Health Centers' resources and is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2017.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments and promotions with tenure

Susan E. Alcock, correction of title as professor of classical archaeology and classics, Department of Classical Studies, LSA, effective Dec. 1, 2016.

Briana Mezuk, correction to effective date of new appointment as associate professor of epidemiology, School of Public Health, effective Sept. 1, 2017. 

Named professorships

*James R. Barber, Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2021.

Gary M. Beckman, George C. Cameron Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Aug. 31, 2021.

*Mark A. Burns, T. C. Chang Professor of Engineering, CoE, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2021.

*Charles A. Cain, Richard A. Auhll Professor of Engineering, CoE, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2021.

*Sherman J. Clark, Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, Law School, effective Dec. 1, 2016, through Nov. 30, 2021.

*Steven P. Croley, Harry Burns Hutchins Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, effective Dec. 1, 2016, through Nov. 30, 2021.

Laura Gültekin, Suzanne Bellinger Feetham Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2020.

*Daniel J. Inman, Clarence L. (Kelly) Johnson Collegiate Professor of Aerospace Engineering, CoE, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

*Nicholas A. Kotov, Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka Professor of Engineering, CoE, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2021.

Jonathan Lee, G. Lawton and Louise G. Johnson Professor of Engineering, CoE, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Jyotirmoy Mazumder, Robert H. Lurie Professor of Engineering, CoE, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

*Trevor N. Mudge, Bredt Family Professor of Engineering, CoE, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2021.

Khalil Najafi, Schlumberger Professor of Engineering, CoE, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Jun Ni, Shien-Ming (Sam) Wu Collegiate Professor of Manufacturing Science, CoE, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Dr. Pavan R. Reddy, Frances and Victor Ginsberg Professor of Hematology/Oncology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Dr. Srijan Sen, correction to title as the Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Professor of Depression and Neurosciences, Medical School, effective Oct. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Kang G. Shin, Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, CoE, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Levi T. Thompson Jr., Richard E. Balzhiser Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering, CoE, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

*Hom-Lay Wang, Collegiate Professor of Dentistry, School of Dentistry, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2021.

Administrative appointments

Matthew L. Boulton, senior associate dean for global public health, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2019.

Cleopatra H. Caldwell, chair, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Dec. 31, 2019.

Dr. Timothy M. Johnson, senior associate dean for clinical affairs, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2017.

Judith M. Lawson, assistant dean for diversity, equity, and inclusion, School of Information, effective Nov. 1, 2016.

Mary C. Ruffolo, associate dean for educational programs, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Aug. 31, 2020.

Dr. Howard Saules, interim director, University Health Services, Student Life, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through Aug. 31, 2017.

Terry G. Wilfong, acting director, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2017, through May 31, 2017.

Dr. Raymond L. Yung, Jeffrey B. Halter, M.D. Collegiate Professor of Geriatric Medicine, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2016, through Aug. 31, 2021.

Flint Campus

Margaret M. Andrews, interim dean, School of Nursing, effective Nov. 1, 2016, through Dec. 31, 2017.

*Reappointments

Retirements

William Alexander, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, professor of English language and literature, LSA, and professor of art and design, Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design, Dec. 31, 2016. Alexander received his first Bachelor of Arts degree in 1960 from Harvard University, and his second in 1962 from Cambridge University. In 1967, he earned his Ph.D. from Harvard. Alexander joined the U-M faculty in 1971. In 2003, he was named an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor. Alexander's expertise includes American documentary film, political theater and video, empowering pedagogy and prison creative arts. He published three books, one of which earned the University of Michigan Press Book Award, and several articles. Alexander was instrumental in developing courses in film study that became integral components of a department and major in LSA. In 1990, he founded the Prison Creative Arts Program, and since 1996, Alexander co-curated 20 annual exhibitions of art by Michigan prisoners. Some of his courses taught students how to facilitate art workshops in urban high schools and Michigan juvenile facilities and prisons, while others trained them to work with incarcerated youth to build creative portfolios.

Anne K. Beaubien, University Library librarian, Aug. 31, 2016. Beaubien received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969 from Michigan State University, and her Master of Arts in library science degree in 1970 from U-M. She joined the university in 1971. She held a number of key positions, including social sciences reference librarian and bibliographic instructor, grants officer, director of the Michigan Information Transfer Source, head of Business and Cooperative Access Services and director of MLibrary Document Delivery. During her career at the university, Beaubien co-taught one of the first information literacy courses offered by U-M, co-authored one of the first textbooks for the emerging field of bibliographic instruction and became the library's lead trainer in the use of online bibliographic databases. She played an instrumental role in the creation of the Michigan Information Transfer Source, one of the first fee-based library document delivery services in the nation designed to serve the research and information needs of businesses, and the 7FAST service, which provided delivery of books and journal articles. Beaubien also directed the library's business and finance office, oversaw the Buhr shelving facility expansion project and helped implement M-Pathways.

Charles C. Bright, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, professor of history and of the Residential College, LSA, Dec. 31, 2016. Bright received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1965 from Washington and Lee University, and a master's degree and Ph.D. from Yale University in 1968 and 1971, respectively. Bright joined the U-M faculty in 1971, and was appointed professor of history and professor of the Residential College in 2001. He was named an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in 2009. Bright also served as interim director and director of the Residential College. He has taught and written extensively on American political history, prison history and the history of Detroit. His groundbreaking work, "The Powers that Punish: Prison and Politics in the Era of the 'Big House', 1920-1955," examined Michigan's state prison at Jackson within the broader context of state political dynamics, theories of punishment, and the history of prisons in the United States. Bright co-founded the Semester in Detroit program, through which students interned with Detroit organizations to work on projects like developing sustainable urban gardening. He also created several undergraduate courses and two undergraduate minors in the areas of crime and justice and global transformation.

Dr. Frank C. Brosius III, professor of internal medicine and of molecular and integrative physiology in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Brosius received a Bachelor of General Studies in 1976 and a medical degree in 1979 from the University of Kansas. He joined the U-M faculty in 1989. Brosius served as the director of the Nephrology Fellowship Program in the division of nephrology from 1996 to 2003, and as chief of the division of nephrology from 2004 to 2016. He is an internationally recognized physician scientist with expertise in molecular and translational kidney research with a goal to develop effective new treatments for diabetic complications. He published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles in high impact journals, and served on the editorial boards for the American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology, the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology and the West Indian Medical Journal. He also served as an ad hoc journal reviewer for many prominent journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine. Brosius was actively involved in numerous national study sections, including the VA Merit Review Board for Nephrology and the National Institutes of Health PBKD Study Section.

Dr. Miles O. Colwell Jr., clinical assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Colwell received a Bachelor of Arts in Education degree in 1979 from The Pennsylvania State University and a medical degree in 1986 from Texas Tech University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1990. Colwell's clinical interests focused on general rehabilitation, manual medicine, biomechanics, spine, amputation management, amputee prosthetics and orthotics and sports medicine. His research focused on manual medicine and the biomechanics of the spine. He contributed to a number of articles, book chapters, and books, and provided lectures to colleagues, residents, and medical students in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, the Division of Occupational Therapy, the Division of Physical Therapy and the Ann Arbor Veterans Administration Hospital. He served as a managed care department representative and on the Pain Management Steering Committee. Colwell worked as an on-site physician for the Trails Edge Camp for Ventilator Dependent Children from 1990 to 2002.  He also served as an on-site physician for the annual U.S. National Water Ski Tournament for the Physically Challenged and for the World Disabled Trophy Water Ski Tournament in 1991 and 1997.

Dr. Louis G. D'Alecy, professor of molecular and integrative physiology in the Medical School, Dec. 14, 2016. D'Alecy received a Doctor of Dental Medicine degree in 1966 from the New Jersey College of Medicine and Dentistry and a Ph.D. in 1971 from the University of Pennsylvania. He joined the U-M faculty in 1973. D'Alecy is a leader in the field of cardiovascular physiology and medicine. His work sought to improve understanding of how blood vessels and blood flow are controlled in heath and disease. His most recent research explored the naturally occurring chemicals that appear to damage the ability of blood vessels to dilate and deliver adequate blood to working tissues and the ability or inability of the body to adapt to inadequate oxygen. He authored numerous articles in the leading peer-reviewed journals and was a frequent invited speaker at national symposia. D'Alecy was actively involved in the Advisory Committee on Appointments, Promotions, and Tenure; the Basic Science Academic Review Board; the Senate Assembly; and the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs. He received numerous awards, including the Kaiser Permanente Award for Excellence in Preclinical Teaching, SACUA's Distinguished Faculty Governance Award and the Medical School's Lifetime Achievement Award in Medical Education.  

Sandra Klein Danziger, Edith A. Lewis Collegiate Professor of Social Work, professor of social work, School of Social Work; and research professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Dec. 31, 2016. Danziger received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971, a Master of Science degree in 1973 and a Ph.D. in 1978, all from Boston University. She joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Danziger studied the effects of public programs on disadvantaged families, poverty policy and demographic trends in child and family well-being, gender issues, program evaluation and qualitative research methods. Besides authoring several notable publications, Danziger served as the principal investigator on research grants funded by several entities, including the Aspen Institute and the Ford Foundation. Danziger was appointed a member of the National Association of Social Work Blue Ribbon Panel on Economic Security and the U.S. General Accounting Office Welfare Reform Advisory Committee, and presented testimony before the Michigan House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Department of Human Services.  She was a visiting scholar residential fellow at the Russell Sage Foundation from 2002 to 2003 and a scholar in residence at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in 2009. She received the Society for Social Work Research's Excellence in Research Award in 2006 and the School of Social Work's Distinguished Faculty Award in 2013.

Dr. Michael A. DiPietro, John F. Holt Collegiate Professor of Radiology, professor of radiology and of pediatrics and communicable diseases in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. DiPietro received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1970 from Union College and a medical degree in 1974 from the State University of New York Upstate Medical Center. He joined the U-M faculty in 1982, and was named the John F. Holt Collegiate Professor of Radiology in 2005. DiPietro is an internationally recognized leader in the field of pediatric radiology. His clinical interests explored a number of areas, including pediatric spinal canal sonography, pediatric brachial plexus sonography, pediatric cranial sonography and pediatric musculoskeletal sonography. DiPietro authored numerous articles in leading, peer-reviewed journals, and was actively involved in a number of professional associations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Institute of Ultrasound and Medicine and the Society of Pediatric Radiology. He received numerous awards, including silver and bronze medals from the Society for Pediatric Radiology; two Certificates of Merit, one cum laude and one magna cum laude from the Radiological Society of North America; and the Andres Giedion Award from the Swiss Society of Radiology. He also received six Excellence in Teaching Medical Students Awards and in 2013, was named an inaugural member of the League of Educational Excellence and Scholarship.

John F. Fink, professor of mathematics and statistics, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, UM-Dearborn, Dec. 31, 2016. Fink received three degrees from Western Michigan University: a Bachelor of Science degree in 1976, a Master of Arts degree and a Ph.D. in 1982. He joined the UM-Dearborn faculty in 1985. Fink's research is in graph theory and combinatorics. He is known for his work in decompositions of hypercubes and Cayley graphs, n-domination in graphs, issues of convexity in graphs and distance distributions in graphs modeling computer networks. He played an instrumental role in the expansion, modernization and improvement of the mathematics curriculum. Fink was actively involved in the development of courses in applied combinatorics, applied algorithmic graph theory and discrete mathematics for computer engineering. He also completely redesigned the bridge course in mathematical language, proof and structure for the mathematics major. Fink refereed and edited numerous journal articles, chaired sessions at graph theory and combinatorics conferences and served as an external reviewer for promotion cases at other universities. He served on a number of U-M committees, including the Department of Mathematics and Statistics Executive Committee, the CASL Curriculum Committee and the CASL representative to the Undergraduate Curriculum and Degree Committee.

Dr. Susan L. Garetz, clinical professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery and of neurology in the Medical School, Nov. 30, 2016. Garetz received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1984 from the University of Minnesota, a medical degree in 1989 from Yale University and a Master of Science degree in 1992 from U-M. She joined the U-M faculty in 1996. Garetz is a leader in the field of sleep disorders with a special expertise in the surgical treatments for obstructive sleep apnea.  She established unique multi-disciplinary clinics for adult and pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea who were refractory to standard medical therapy. Garetz's research has focused on the neurocognitive consequences of sleep disordered breathing in children and how to best identify children at higher risk for the development of morbidity. She was a co-investigator on several National Institutes of Health studies evaluating ways to improve diagnostic accuracy and expand treatment options for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.  She also served as the surgical director for the Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Study, the first multi-center, randomized controlled study of adenotonsillectomy for children with obstructive sleep apnea.

Gary D. Glick, Werner E. Bachmann Collegiate Professor of Chemistry and professor of chemistry, LSA, Dec. 31, 2016. Glick received a Bachlelor of Arts degree in 1983 from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in 1988 from Columbia University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1990 and was named the Werner E. Bachmann Collegiate Professor of Chemistry in 1999. Glick's research focused on metabolic control in the immune system and the development of new drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer. His work explored a number of topics, including synthetic, medicinal and bio-organic chemistry; small molecule drug discovery and development, especially for autoimmune diseases, cancer and chronic inflammatory conditions; and protein-nucleic acid interactions. Glick authored numerous articles in the leading peer-reviewed journals, served as the editor-in-chief of the journal Biopolymers and has been issued a number of innovative U.S. patents. He founded several companies, including Lycera Corp. and IFM Therapeutics, and played an instrumental role in the founding of the independent and interdisciplinary Chemical Biology Program. He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2007.

Sally K. Guthrie, professor of pharmacy, College of Pharmacy; professor of psychiatry in the Medical School; and clinical pharmacist in the U-M Hospital Pharmacy Services, Aug. 31, 2016. Guthrie received a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of the Pacific in 1979. She joined the U-M faculty in 1986. Guthrie was one of the first clinical pharmacy specialists in psychopharmacology in the nation. She is known for her pharmacokinetic studies of psychoactive drugs and her research related to substance abuse and the use of tobacco. She and others successfully petitioned the Board of Pharmaceutical Specialty to provide board certification for psychiatric pharmacists in the early 1990s. Guthrie was also instrumental in the establishment of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists in 1998 and served in several leadership roles within the organization. She was honored by the CPNP with the Judith J. Saklad Memorial Award in 2016 for professional distinction and the optimization of patient care. Guthrie served as vice-chair and chair of the College of Pharmacy's Curriculum Committee from 2002 to 2005 and played an instrumental role in the redesign of the pharmacy curriculum that ensured the college's accreditation status.

Dr. Daniel B. Hinshaw, professor of surgery in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Hinshaw received a Bachelor of Science and medical degrees in 1978 from Loma Linda University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1987, and served as chief of surgery from 1987 to 1997 and chief of staff from 1997 to 2000 at the affiliated VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. He was the assistant dean for veteran affairs in the Medical School from 1997 to 2000. Hinshaw's clinical interests are in surgical oncology, gastrointestinal surgery and palliative medicine.  His major research interests have largely focused on understanding the basic biochemical mechanisms underlying cell injury and death as mediated by reactive oxygen species. Other research interests included the toxicology of the chemical warfare agent mustard gas, the role of the microfilament system in coordinating the events of programmed cell death, care at the end-of-life and the use of complementary medicine in the relief of pain. He authored the book "Suffering and the Nature of Healing," published a number of journal articles in leading peer-reviewed publications and served as an editorial board member for Free Radical Biology & Medicine. Hinshaw played an instrumental role in the development of the clinical and educational components of the university's successful hospice and palliative medicine program and served as the founding medical director of the Palliative Medicine Consultation Service at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System from 2001 to 2007.

Graham Rex Holland, professor of dentistry in the School of Dentistry, Dec. 31, 2016. Holland received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1968, a Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree in 1971 and a Ph.D. in 1975, all from the University of Bristol. He joined the U-M faculty in 1995. Holland is an internationally recognized leader and researcher in the field of dentistry with special expertise in the areas of endodontics and orofacial pain. The National Institutes of Health and the Medical Research Council of Canada funded his research. Holland published 72 peer-reviewed scientific papers, 10 books and nine book chapters. He served as the president of the Pulp Biology Group of the International Association for Dental Research. He chaired the Research and Scientific Affairs Committee of the American Association of Endodontists from 2003 to 2006. Holland has been the editor-in-chief of the Archives of Oral Biology since 1996. His service on the Senate Assembly included chairing both the Committee for a Multicultural University and the Civil Liberties Board from 2006 to 2009. He received the Pulp Biology Research Award, the highest recognition in the field of endodontics, from the International Association for Dental Research in 1997.

David A. James, professor of mathematics, College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, UM-Dearborn, Dec. 31, 2016. James received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1964 from Miami University of Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1966 and 1970, respectively.  He joined the UM-Dearborn faculty in 1976. James' scholarly work focused on pure research on automorphic functions, applied work in computer-aided geometric design and the pedagogical treatments of Möbius strips and the singular value decomposition. His articles have been published by a number of notable journals, including the College Mathematics Journal and The American Mathematical Monthly. James' interdisciplinary and collaborative research examined the mathematical structure underlying the color-reversing friezes of buildings façades in the village of Pirgí on the Greek island of Chios. He also led a 10-year project to study the mathematical patterns represented in European folk costumes. James taught a wide variety of undergraduate and graduate courses on pure and applied mathematics as well as guided the early integration of computers in the calculus curriculum.  He received a number of UM-Dearborn awards, including two Distinguished Teaching Awards, the Best in Class Award and the Distinguished Service Award.

Dr. Fareed Khaja, clinical professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Khaja received a Bachelor of Medicine degree from Osmania University in Hyderabad, India, in 1961. He joined the U-M faculty as a clinical professor of internal medicine in 2004. Khaja is a leader in the field of cardiology, with special expertise in the clinical treatment of coronary disease and valvular heart disease. His research interests focused on ethnicity and coronary disease. Khaja authored 82 peer-reviewed articles in a number of prominent journals, including the American Heart Journal, Angiology and Circulation. He has given lectures on hemodynamics to cardiology fellows at the U-M, and has consistently received outstanding teaching evaluations. He was a member of a number of professional associations, including the American Medical Association, the Detroit Academy of Medicine, the Detroit Heart Club and the Michigan chapter of the American College of Cardiology. Khaja received three Henry Ford Hospital Best Teacher Awards from the cardiology fellows in 1993, 1996 and 1997. He also earned the Midwest affiliate of the American Heart Association's Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003, and the U-M's Best Teacher Award from the cardiology fellows in 2009.  

Miles Spencer Kimball, professor of economics, LSA; and research professor in the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, Aug. 31, 2016. Kimball received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1982 from Harvard University, a Master of Arts degree in 1984 from Brigham Young University and a Ph.D. in 1987 from Harvard University. He joined the U-M faculty in 1987.  Kimball is best known for a highly influential body of work on risk preference. His earliest work formalized the link between risk aversion and precautionary saving using a utility-function-based measure of prudence. He and his collaborators then pioneered measuring preference parameters using survey questions that are carefully motivated by economic theory, and showed how these measures relate to portfolio choice and to risky behaviors like smoking or migrating. In other lines of work, he developed a tractable representation of the canonical model of the business cycle, and made theoretical and practical contributions to monetary policy. His recent work focused on the interpretation of measures of happiness and life satisfaction, linking a vast empirical literature primarily in psychology with utility maximization as understood by economists. Kimball taught undergraduate and graduate courses in macroeconomics at all levels.

Hal Morgenstern, professor of epidemiology and of environmental health sciences, School of Public Health; and professor of urology, Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Morgenstern received a Bachelor of Architecture degree in 1969 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Master of Regional Planning degree and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1974 and 1978, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 2003 and served as chair of the Department of Epidemiology from 2003 to 2008. Morgenstern is recognized as a leader in the development and teaching of epidemiologic methods and their applications to the study of chronic diseases, injuries, occupational and environmental health and clinical research.  He co-authored more than 240 peer-reviewed publications, many technical reports and the textbook "Epidemiologic Research: Principles and Quantitative Methods." This textbook established a framework for understanding study design and estimation validity that has become standard in the teaching and practice of contemporary epidemiology. Morgenstern championed the teaching of epidemiologic concepts, principles, and methods; established a mentoring program for junior faculty in the department; and developed a new M.S. training program in clinical research. He served on a number of task forces, scientific committees, and editorial boards in the United States and abroad. Morgenstern received the Herman A. Tyroler Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2003.

Marc Perlin, professor of naval architecture and marine engineering, director academic program, Marine Hydrodynamic Laboratories, Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, and professor of mechanical engineering, College of Engineering, Dec. 31, 2016. Perlin received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1974 from Drexel University, a Master of Civil Engineering degree in 1978 from University of Delaware and a Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Florida. He joined the U-M faculty in 1989. Perlin's research focused primarily on two areas of fluid dynamics: free-surface flows and friction drag reduction. His work explored fundamental physical insight into nonlinear wave-wave interactions of surface gravity-capillary and gravity water waves. Since this earlier work, Perlin re-focused his efforts to those of breaking waves, which resulted in the seminal paper on this subject in the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics. In the latter half of his tenure, Perlin and colleagues studied several methodologies to inhibit friction drag on surface and sub-surface vessels, which culminated in his authorship of "Mitigation of Hydrodynamic Resistance: Methods to Reduce Hydrodynamic Drag." Perlin taught 22 distinct classes during his time at U-M, which accounts for more than half of the naval architecture and marine engineering curriculum. 

Dr. Barbara D. Reed, professor of family medicine in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Reed received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1975 from Purdue University, a medical degree in 1978 from Washington University in St. Louis and a Master of Science in Public Health degree in 1984 from the University of Utah. She joined the U-M faculty in 1989. Reed is a leader in the field of family medicine, with special expertise in women's health, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of vulvodynia, and recurrent vaginitis. She systematically developed a line of research in vulvovaginitis, which has progressed to innovative work in the area of vulvodynia, involving a novel psychoneuroimmunologic model for what is a disabling and perplexing problem of significant functional impact. She authored numerous peer-reviewed articles in leading journals and was a frequent invited speaker at national symposia. Reed also served as an ad hoc reviewer for many major academic family medicine journals, including the American Journal of Public Health and the New England Journal of Medicine, as well as an editorial board member of the Archives of Family Medicine. In addition, Reed maintained an active clinical practice and was nationally known as a resource for patients with complex health conditions. 

Daniel G. Saunders, professor of social work, School of Social Work, Dec. 31, 2016. Saunders received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969 from St. John's University. He earned a Master of Science in Social Work degree and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1973 and 1979. Saunders joined the U-M faculty in 1991, and was named the program co-director of the Interdisciplinary Research Program on Violence Across the Lifespan in 1995. Early in Saunder's career, he established one of the first intervention programs for men who abuse their partners and helped develop programs for abused women.  He served as a consultant to more than 60 organizations at the local, state and national levels and served on the editorial boards of several journals. At U-M, Saunders co-chaired the President's Task Force on Violence Against Women on Campus and developed practice and research courses on the prevention of family violence. His studies focus on offender program evaluation, the traumatic effects of victimization and the response of professionals to intimate partner violence. Saunders authored more than 80 scholarly publications that have been cited more than 6,000 times.  He was the principal investigator on research grants from the National Institute of Justice, the National Institute of Mental Health, the U.S. Department of Justice's Office on Violence Against Women and the Centers for Disease Control. Saunders received a Fulbright Faculty Scholar Program grant to conduct research at the Te Awatea Violence Research Centre in New Zealand.

Jochen Schacht, professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Schacht received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1962 from the Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in Germany. He earned a Master of Science degree in 1965 and a Ph.D. in 1968 from the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität in Heidelberg, Germany. He joined the U-M faculty in 1973. Schacht has worked in the area of hearing sciences for almost 45 years and has built major worldwide collaborative research programs. His area of research interest is the neuroscience and molecular biology of the auditory system, including studies on signaling pathways in sound processing; the mechanisms and prevention of acquired hearing loss due to noise, drugs and aging; and the development of novel broad-spectrum antibiotics with a low ototoxicity profile. He is credited with the first successful clinical trial to prevent antibiotic-induced hearing loss.  Schacht led major research teams under the National Institutes of Health Program Project (P01) and P30 Center support for more than 40 years and received the Senator Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award. He initiated the Hearing, Balance and Chemical Senses program at U-M in 1987. Schacht held a number of leadership positions, including chair of the Graduate Program in Physiological Acoustics from 1981 to 1990 and director of the Kresge Hearing Research Institute from 2000 to 2014. Schacht has received numerous awards, including the university's Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award and the Medical School's League of Research Excellence. In 2008, he was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Leslie A. Shimp, professor of pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, assistant professor of pharmacy, Department of Family Medicine, Medical School and clinical pharmacist, U-M Hospital Pharmacy Services, Aug. 31, 2016. Shimp received three degrees from U-M: a Bachelor of Science degree in 1974, a Doctor of Pharmacy degree in 1976 and a Master of Science degree in 1986. She joined the U-M faculty in 1976. Shimp is a highly respected pioneer in the fields of ambulatory care pharmacy and the management of complex medication problems in elderly patients. She championed innovative models of collaborative care and was actively involved with the Integrative Medicine Program and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Her work on women's health, alternative approaches to medical care and the treatment of therapeutically complex patients gained her national recognition as a leader in the field of pharmacy practice. Shimp received the College of Pharmacy's Teaching Excellence Award in 2004 and the Student Appreciation Award in 2009. She received two Innovative Pharmacy Practice Awards in 2006 and 2011 from the Michigan Pharmacist Association and a Best Practice Award in Health System Pharmacy in 2011 from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Marshal Shlafer, professor of pharmacology, Medical School, Dec. 31, 2016. Shlafer received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969 from the University of Connecticut and his Ph.D. in 1974 from the Medical College of Georgia. He joined U-M in 1977, and served as associate dean for student programs in the Medical School from 1992 to 1997. Shlafer is internationally recognized for his research on the mechanisms by which oxygen deprivation due to ischemia damages the heart. His work explored the possible subcellular sources of oxygen radicals, the chemical nature of the radicals, changes in endogenous myocardial defensive mechanisms against free radical-induced damage and pharmacologic approaches to preventing such damage. Shlafer used physiologic, biochemical and electron microscopic-histochemical approaches to study these problems. He authored 54 manuscripts in leading peer-reviewed scientific journals, four textbooks on pharmacology and therapeutics for nurses and seven book chapters. Shlafer has a record of successfully obtaining research funding from the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association of Michigan. Throughout his career, He received four Excellence in Teaching Awards, the Kaiser Permanente's Teaching Excellence Award and the Elizabeth Crosby Award. 

Lawrence Sklar, Carl G. Hempel and William K. Frankena Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and professor of philosophy, LSA, Dec. 31, 2016. Sklar received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1958 from Oberlin College. He earned a Master of Arts degree and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1960 and 1964, respectively. Sklar joined the U-M faculty in 1968. He was named the James B. and Grace J. Nelson Professor of Philosophy from 1994 to 1995, the William K. Frankena Collegiate Professor from 1995 to 2002 and the Carl G. Hempel and William K. Frankena Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy from 2002 to 2016. Sklar is one of the most distinguished philosophers of science in the world. His 1974 book "Space, Time, and Spacetime" won the Franklin J. Machette Prize for the best book in philosophy by an author under the age of 40. His 1993 book "Physics and Chance," which provided the leading systemic account of foundational philosophical problems in statistical mechanics, won the Lakatos Award for best book in philosophy of science. Sklar has won fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Science Foundation. He delivered the Locke Lectures at Oxford University. He was the president of the American Philosophical Association (Central Division), is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a titular member of the Académie Internationale de Philosophie des Sciences.

Margaret Ramsay Somers, professor of sociology, LSA, Sept. 30, 2016. Somers received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971 from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a Ph.D. in 1986 from Harvard University. She joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Somers is widely regarded as one of the discipline's most theoretically innovative scholars. She worked at the intersection of cultural sociology, historical methods and social theory. Broadly concerned with the place of citizenship in modern democratic theory, Somers explored the ways in which markets, legal practices, the state and even theoretical knowledge itself have advanced or not advanced the modernist project of expanding individual and collective rights. Somers received several academic awards and honors. Her 2008 book, "Genealogies of Citizenship: Markets, Statelessness, and the Right to have Rights," earned the Giovanni Sartori Book Award in Qualitative Methodology from the American Political Science Association. She won the Best Article Award in Political Sociology in 1994 and the Best Article Award in Cultural Sociology in 1997 from the American Sociological Association. In 2006, she was selected as the inaugural winner of the Lewis A. Coser Award.

Melanie G. Urbanchek, research associate professor, surgery, Medical School, Sept.14, 2016. Urbanchek received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1966 from Ohio University, a Master of Science degree in 1976 from California State University, Fullerton and a Ph.D. in 1986 from University of Southern California. She joined the U-M faculty in 1992. Urbanchek studied muscle and nerve physiology relative to medicine. Her most recent research focused on the development of a living peripheral nerve interface, peripheral nerve repair, skeletal muscle reinnervation and myocyte implantation. Urbanchek has been either the principal investigator or the co-principal investigator on research grants totaling more than $16 million.  Her extensive record of publications includes 50 peer-reviewed journal articles, 80 abstracts, and six patents. She was involved in a number of professional associations, including the American Society for Peripheral Nerve, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the Council on Undergraduate Research and the Plastic Surgery Research Council.

Richard L. Valliant, research professor in the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, Dec. 31, 2016. Valliant received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1972 from the University of Arkansas, a Master of Science degree in 1975 from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in 1983 from The Johns Hopkins University. He joined the U-M faculty in 2003.  He served as associate director of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology for the University of Maryland and U-M from 2010 to 2016. Valliant has made important contributions in the areas of imputation for missing data, variance estimation for complex survey data, record linkage and statistical software development. He has more than 40 years of experience in survey sampling, estimation theory, and statistical computing, including work on the Consumer Price Index, the Producer Price Index, and other surveys that supply some of the nation's key economic indicators. He has been an editor of Survey Methodology, the Journal of Official Statistics, and both sections of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. Valliant received several awards, including the 2008 Statistical Science Award-Applied Paper Category from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Commissioner's Eminent Achievement Award for work on the formula bias question in the Consumer Price Index and the U.S. Department of Labor Secretary's Exceptional Achievement Award for work on redesign of the Current Population Survey. He was also elected a fellow of the American Statistical Association in 1992, and has been an elected member of the International Statistical Institute since 2001.

Robert E. Whallon Jr., professor of anthropology and curator, Museum of Anthropological Archaeology, LSA, Dec. 31, 2016. Whallon received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1961 from Harvard College, and a Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1963 and 1966. He joined the U-M faculty in 1966, and served as acting director from 1978 to 1979 and director from 1997 to 2002 of the Museum of Anthropology. Whallon's contributions have appeared in monographs, book chapters and journal articles. He founded the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology and was a first-generation practitioner of the "New Archaeology." Whallon was known for his development of statistical and other quantitative methods for the analysis of archaeological data, which led to his election as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Later in his career, he focused on the organization and adaptations of hunter-gatherer societies as an aid to understanding the origins and evolution of human culture. Whallon's most recent research focused on the behavior and ecology of our recent, Eurasian, hominin relatives, based on the excavation of a Neanderthal site in Montenegro. He was elected a foreign member of the Montenegrin Academy of Sciences and the Arts in 2015.

James H. Woods, professor of pharmacology, Medical School; and professor of psychology, LSA, Sept. 2, 2016. Woods received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1959 from Ohio University, and a Master of Arts degree a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 1962 and 1968. He joined the U-M faculty in 1965. Woods' research interests have been on the effects of psychoactive drugs on the behavior of rats and rhesus monkeys, with a particular interest in how drug-receptor interactions can be reflected in various behavioral measures. Many of these drugs are drugs of abuse, and he concentrated on understanding the behavioral mechanisms of action of opioids, stimulants and nicotine, with a hope of identifying improved drug treatments for abuse of each of these compounds. Woods published 433 peer-reviewed articles, 100 book chapters and two editions of "A Handbook on Drug and Alcohol Abuse: The Biomedical Aspects." Woods has received numerous awards for his research, including the College on Problems of Drug Dependence's Nathan B. Eddy Memorial Award in 2004 and the American Psychological Association's Brady-Schuster Award in 2006.

Susan J. Wortman, senior associate librarian in the University Library, June 30, 2016. Wortman received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1976 from Hillsdale College and a master's degree in library science in 1990 from U-M. She joined the U-M faculty in 2006, and held a number of positions, including information resources reference specialist and undergraduate reference and instruction librarian. Wortman's instructional activities included teaching social work faculty and students the models for community profiling, grant-seeking, comprehensive literature reviewing and citation analysis. She worked extensively with the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program and other undergraduates to help guide them in conducting research throughout the social sciences. Her publications and presentations touched several issues, including conducting systematic reviews, altmetrics, liaison roles in academic libraries, scholarly communication and curriculum development. Wortman served on the School of Social Work's Curriculum Council from 2009 to 2016, where she implemented new curriculum-integrated library classes and workshops for graduate students. In 2014, she created and implemented a series of course-integrated learning objects that taught students how to use key government information resources to review literature and profile communities. She also built paper and digital social sciences collections, managed and co-managed well over a million dollars in purchases, conducted hundreds of in-depth research consultations and created dozens of course-integrated research guides. Her library systemwide contributions included chairing the Diversity Council and the Instruction Assessment Task Force.

Comments

meredith schwartz
on 12/09/16 at 1:58 am

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Your blog seems really helpful for the community and students career sector.
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