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May 23, 2017

Nine scientists, engineers from U-M elected to AAAS

November 21, 2016

Nine scientists, engineers from U-M elected to AAAS

Topic: Campus News

Nine University of Michigan faculty members are among 391 newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The scientists and engineers were chosen by their peers "because of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished," according to an AAAS statement.

They will be honored Feb. 18 at the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

The new fellows are:

• Lynn Conway, professor emerita of electrical engineering and computer science in the College of Engineering, for groundbreaking and fundamental contributions to VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) design and production of integrated circuits, including methods for dynamic instruction execution and the creation and fabrication of multiproject chips.

• Steven Cundiff, the Harrison M. Randall Collegiate Professor of Physics in LSA, and professor of electrical engineering and computer science in CoE, for the development and applications of methods for the coherent optical control of electronic properties of atoms, molecules and solids.

• Martin Myers Jr., the Marilyn H. Vincent Professor of Diabetes Research, professor of internal medicine, and molecular and integrative physiology in the Medical School, for distinguished contributions to the field of diabetes and obesity-related research, including in the understanding of leptin action.

• Henry Paulson, the Lucile Groff Chair of Neurology for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders and professor of neurology in the Medical School, for distinguished contributions to the field of neurodegeneration, particularly for insights into the cause of polyglutamine diseases and developing RNA interference therapy for neurodegenerative disease.

• Kamal Sarabandi, the Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science in CoE, for broad contributions to the field of applied electromagnetics, to engineering education, and to sustained economic growth.

• Santiago Schnell, professor of molecular and integrative physiology and computational medicine and bioinformatics in the Medical School, for distinguished contributions to the field of mathematical biology, particularly for the theoretical modeling of complex biochemical reactions and optimal estimation of their rates.

• Michael Solomon, professor of chemical engineering, and macromolecular science and engineering in CoE, and associate dean for academic programs and initiatives at the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, for distinguished contributions to the field of colloid science, particularly for creating and understanding colloidal self-assemblies with new symmetries and new functions.

• Abigail Stewart, the Sandra Schwartz Tangri Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies in LSA, for research on the psychology of women's lives and adaptation to social change, including comparative and longitudinal analyses, and research on gender and science.

• Donald R. Zak, the Burton V. Barnes Collegiate Professor, professor of natural resources and associate dean for academic affairs in the School of Natural Resources and Environment, and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology in LSA, for outstanding contributions to the fields of terrestrial and microbial ecology, particularly for experimental work identifying mechanisms of ecosystem response to environmental change.

Founded in 1848, the American Association for the Advancement of Science is the world's largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal Science. This year's fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science Nov. 25.

Comments

noelie Schnell
on 11/22/16 at 7:05 pm

Studies for a better world and environment. Thanks to the AAAS

noelie Schnell
on 11/22/16 at 7:05 pm

Studies for a better world and environment. Thanks to the AAAS

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