University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

September 21, 2017

Multimedia Features

May 26, 2017

The Arts Wall

The Arts Wall, featuring Aaron Dworkin, Yo-Yo Ma and Lara Downes

Aaron Dworkin, dean of the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, recently joined acclaimed cellist Yo Yo Ma and pianist Lara Downes to perform in a video performance of a short cello, spoken-word and piano piece that celebrates and makes a statement about the power and purpose of the arts in America.

May 25, 2017

Comfort-driven data

Comfort Driven Data | Carol Menassa

Carol Menassa, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, looks for new ways to keep people comfortable while making buildings more sustainable. In this video, she discusses her work to understand and model the impact of occupants on energy use in buildings and other spaces, and develop decision frameworks to sustainably retrofit existing buildings.

May 24, 2017

Momentum

Spring LSA graduate Kathleen Guytingco's photo took first place in the latest Arts at Michigan As I See It photo contest, which was built around the theme of "motion." The photo, titled "Momentum," was taken at the Power Center for the Performing Arts. See more entries and learn more about the As I See It competitions.

May 23, 2017

What Magnet means for patients

What Magnet means for patients at Michigan Medicine

When Michigan Medicine earned Magnet status for its nursing care in February, it became one of only 6 percent of U.S. hospitals to earn the honor. In this video, Katie Scott, secretary of the U-M Professional Nurse Council, and Margaret Calarco, senior associate director of patient care and chief of nursing services, explain what the designation means for U-M patients.

May 22, 2017

Peony time

The Nichols Arboretum peony garden is about to undergo its annual transformation into a wave of white, pink and red as it bursts into nearly 10,000 blooms. The arboretum is home to the largest collection of heirloom herbaceous peonies in North America. New this spring are more than 70 varieties of vintage — pre-1950 — herbaceous peonies, which join the nearly 300 historic varieties from the 19th and early 20th century already growing in the main beds. Read more about the new peonies and follow the progress of this year's blooms on the garden's website. (Photo by Michele Yanga)

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