University of Michigan
News for faculty, staff and retirees

February 16, 2019

In The News

January 10, 2019

“Donald Trump has been overestimating his knowledge for decades. It’s not surprising that he would continue that pattern into the White House,” said Brendan Nyhan, professor of public policy, in a story about the Dunning-Kruger effect, in which people think they know more than they really do and tend to be more boastful about it.

The Washington Post

January 9, 2019

“The hard outcome is we have these new products and they’re just about as good or slightly better than what we have. And they’re a lot more expensive,” said Nicholson Price, assistant professor of law, on how drugmakers develop medication that refines a low-tech remedy, run clinical trials to secure FDA approval and then sell it at a higher price.

The Washington Post

January 9, 2019

A profile of Elizabeth Anderson, professor of philosophy and a champion of the view that equality and freedom are mutually dependent, suggests she may be the philosopher best suited for this time of intractable political division in America because she brings together ideas from the left and the right to battle increasing inequality.

The New Yorker

January 7, 2019

“The economy is doing well right now. The problem is that it’s being goosed by (ill-timed) fiscal stimulus, and that’s going to wear off,” said Justin Wolfers, professor of economics and public policy.

MarketWatch

December 17, 2018

“With fresh water supplies vulnerable to a changing climate, and our infrastructure outdated … we need to do more to protect America’s waterways and ensure continued progress in the effort to provide clean drinking water, and fishable and swimmable streams. … The last thing we should do is turn back the clock, weaken the Clean Water Act and further fray our national commitment to clean water and a healthy environment,” wrote David Uhlmann, director of the Environmental Law and Policy Program.

The New York Times

December 17, 2018

Kristin Seefeldt, associate professor of social work, and of public policy, was quoted in an article about recent changes to Michigan’s emergency heating assistance program that advocates fear will leave needy residents without the help they need to keep the heat on this winter.

Bridge Magazine

December 17, 2018

“The tactic of telling a subject not in custody that he or she doesn’t need an attorney present during an interview may be standard, but whether it is savory is a matter of opinion. Still, it strikes me as odd for a tactic that is used every day with suspected criminals of every description to come under fire only when used against a highly sophisticated, extremely well-connected defendant (former national security adviser Michael Flynn),” said David Moran, clinical professor of law and director of the Michigan Innocence Clinic.

The Washington Post

December 14, 2018

“While 95 percent of the conductors are men, if some of them aren’t great, that doesn’t affect the entire perception of the male conductor. If even some of us are out there, and we’re not excelling, and not achieving, and not doing the best we can, it’d be so easy for us to slide down the slope of ‘Oh well, women conductors are — they’re a novelty,’” said Chelsea Gallo, doctoral student in musical arts and cover conductor of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Michigan Radio

December 14, 2018

“Hospitals are absolutely marking up the prices for medical devices,” said Jeffrey McCullough, associate professor of health management and policy. But, he added, “You can almost guarantee the list price you see on a hospital bill is not what the hospital is getting paid by insurance companies,” which bargain for discounts.

ABC News

December 14, 2018

“You do have this irony, and that is the policy that is overwhelmingly endorsed by economists of the right, the center and the left as the best way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is inverse with what is politically feasible,” said Barry Rabe, professor of public policy, environment and political science.

Politico

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