University of Michigan
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July 19, 2019

In The News

May 22, 2019

“The point is not what’s happened to this particular individual but (that) this is an example of what happens to transgender people interacting with the health care system,” said Daphna Stroumsa, clinical lecturer in obstetrics and gynecology, regarding a pregnant transgender man in labor whose severe abdominal pains were misdiagnosed.

The Associated Press

May 22, 2019

“The U.K.’s exit should make it less likely for other EU member states to leave, because Brexit is probably going to be a disaster for the U.K.,” said Donald Regan, professor of law and philosophy, who noted that Britain had always focused on the free-market aspects of the European Union rather than an “ever closer political union.”

MarketWatch

May 22, 2019

“Many adults are not aware of what vaccines they actually need. That is also balanced by physician unawareness of what vaccines they should be recommending. It’s gotten very complicated, and it is difficult to keep up with all the changes,” said Pamela Rockwell, associate professor of family medicine.

National Public Radio

May 22, 2019

Eric Kort, assistant professor of climate and space sciences and engineering, says it’s crucial to understand why methane levels in the atmosphere have sharply increased since 2007: “Is atmospheric methane increasing as a consequence of climate change, not of our direct emissions? Are some thresholds being passed? It is a wicked problem, but it’s not unsolvable.”

WIRED

May 22, 2019

“Many people may not realize they could help preserve brain health by managing their blood pressure and blood sugar, getting more physical activity and better sleep, and stopping smoking,” said Donovan Maust, assistant professor of psychiatry.

UPI

May 17, 2019

Paolo Pasquariello, professor of finance, says that “tariffs on Chinese and American imports will be paid for almost entirely by local consumers, especially U.S. consumers, given that they collectively import from China more than they sell to it. In other words, U.S. tariffs act exactly like taxes on American consumption of foreign goods and services, and those taxes will lower American consumers’ real income, discourage some of their consumption and ultimately lower U.S. GDP growth.”

The Hill

May 17, 2019

Katherine Freese, professor of physics, discussed weakly-interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, which are popular candidates for dark matter: “If we’re right and these are the dark matter particles then there would be billions of them going through you every second. But they’re not going to do anything to you because the interactions are really, really weak.”

The Naked Scientists

May 17, 2019

Silvia Pedraza, professor of sociology and American culture, says the new economic sanctions against Cuba aren’t going to break the current regime — all they’re going to do is make it economically difficult for people: "But they will find a way around it. It just isn’t going to have the political consequences that ([the U.S. hopes) it will have.”

National Public Radio

May 16, 2019

“I think a ban will send a very strong statement within the national conversation about the potential harms associated with (facial-recognition technology). … We already know that it infringes on people’s privacy and it heavily discriminates against some groups of people,” said Sarita Yardi Schoenebeck, associate professor of information, about a potential ban of facial-recognition technology in San Francisco.

Mashable

May 16, 2019

The need for drug treatment programs is higher than any other unmet need across the state, with nearly a third of Michigan counties lacking medication-based treatment services for opioid addiction, says Tom Ivacko, associate director of the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy: “That is higher than the need for access to affordable housing, job training, public transportation, subsidized health care, child care, emergency food and so on.”

Michigan Radio

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