University of Michigan
News for faculty, staff and retirees

April 19, 2019

In The News

April 16, 2019

“You don’t necessarily think of another human listening to what you’re telling your smart speaker in the intimacy of your home. I think we’ve been conditioned to the [assumption] that these machines are just doing magic machine learning. But the fact is there is still manual processing involved,” said Florian Schaub, professor of information, and electrical engineering and computer science, commenting on Amazon employees who listen to voice recordings captured in private homes and offices to help improve the Alexa digital assistant powering its line of Echo speakers.

Bloomberg

April 16, 2019

Infection rates are rising for women under age 40 throughout the United States who haven’t received the HPV vaccine — putting those women at a higher risk for a variety of cancers, 90 percent of which are otherwise preventable, according to a study by Andrew Brouwer, research investigator in epidemiology at the School of Public Health.

UPI

April 15, 2019

“There’s so much more that can be done. It would be hard for us to be doing less,” said Briana Mezuk, associate professor of epidemiology, on the rising suicide rate of senior citizens in long-term care settings, which could be a critical place to intervene to avert suicide — and to help people find meaning, purpose and quality of life.

PBS NewsHour

April 15, 2019

Walter Lasecki, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and of information, discussed his work on a project that combines human and artificial intelligence in autonomous vehicles to make self-driving cars safer.

Michigan Radio

April 15, 2019

Despite efforts to purge his influence, Thai politician Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit has emerged as the major opponent of the military in Thailand: “Thanathorn is young, rich, handsome, well-spoken, a skilled debater and absolutely clear in his pro-democratic political convictions. It appears Thailand’s conservative forces are unwilling to let such a threat go unchecked,” co-wrote Allen Hicken, professor of political science.

The Washington Post

April 12, 2019

“Many of these people are looking for an urban lifestyle, and it’s too expensive to move to San Francisco, Seattle. It’s young college graduates who have got some creative skills or advance training in AI or computer science,” said Ren Farley, professor emeritus of sociology and population studies, on efforts by Rust Belt cities to transform old manufacturing sites into office, apartment, retail and entertainment meccas.

Bloomberg

April 12, 2019

“Most of the time, the footprint of the communities where we’re asking to host a wind farm, one or two wind turbines would be enough to satisfy the energy needs in that particular place. And we’re usually asking them to host 25 or 50,” said Sarah Mills, a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy.

Michigan Radio

April 12, 2019

“I grew up watching ‘The Jetsons.’ To see this becoming a reality is really something. We were very surprised by the results,” said Gregory Keoleian, director of the Center for Sustainable Systems, and professor of sustainability and environment, and civil and environmental engineering, who along with CSS graduate students Akshat Kasliwal and Noah Furbush found that flying electric cars would have about 52 percent lower greenhouse gas emissions than traditional cars and 6 percent lower emissions than electric cars for trips of 100 kilometers or more.

CNN

April 11, 2019

The Trump administration’s plan to purge Medicare of the rebates that drug manufacturers pay to firms that manage pharmacy insurance could potentially slash out-of-pocket costs for some of the sickest Americans, writes A. Mark Fendrick, professor of internal medicine, and health management and policy, and director of U-M’s Center for Value-Based Insurance Design.

The Detroit News

April 11, 2019

“At every step along this historical path, Democrats have many times been intensely interested in disenfranchising poor, urban black voters, too,” said Heather Ann Thompson, professor of history, Afroamerican and African studies, and in the Residential College. She recently took part in a discussion on voter suppression with other leading scholars and Stacey Abrams, who narrowly lost the 2018 Georgia governor’s race.

The New York Times

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