University of Michigan
News for faculty, staff and retirees

December 18, 2018

In The News

December 12, 2018

“Until recently, no party has tried to hamstring their opponents’ future power the way the Republicans are doing it now. They are a bad sign that state politics is being infected by the toxic national political environment,” said John Chamberlin, professor emeritus of political science and public policy.

NBC News

December 12, 2018

Jonathan Levine, professor of urban and regional planning, says parking is too cheap and plentiful in most cities, and if developers replaced parking with housing, the result would be a denser environment that enables people to walk, bike and take public transportation to where they work and shop.

Lansing State Journal

December 11, 2018

“I think the impact is corrosive in many ways to the democratic process over time. It certainly leaves many voters feeling like their vote doesn’t count,” said Tom Ivacko, associate director of the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy, on the disproportionate power that rural voters hold over urban voters.

The New York Times

December 11, 2018

“If we are going to improve our state’s education system, we need to figure out how to help kids get to school. The data show that to do that we have to address the impact of homelessness and poverty,” said Jennifer Erb-Downward, senior research associate at Poverty Solutions, whose study shows one in six Michigan students are chronically absent from school.

WXYZ / Detroit

December 11, 2018

“Once partisan goals trump democratic commitments, everything is on the table. Scholars of democratic erosion know how dangerous this situation can be,” said Brendan Nyhan, professor of public policy, commenting on the actions by Republican-controlled state legislatures to limit the power of newly elected Democratic administrations.

Vox

December 10, 2018

Andrew Hoffman, professor of management and organizations, and of environment and sustainability, discussed the risk climate change poses to the economy, and how that risk might help convince people skeptical about climate change to change their mind: “A lot can happen between now and 2100.”

Michigan Radio

December 10, 2018

James Hathaway, professor of law and director of the Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, said the United Nations’ Global Compact for Migration is not only nonbinding but is also not a treaty: “No government has to do anything here other than show up for meetings.”

The Globe and Mail (Canada)

December 10, 2018

“Since 2016, there has been an increase again in the demand for light duty trucks, which, combined with lower oil prices, created more supply in the SUV market. We need to do much more to electrify those vehicles if we are to meet targets,” said Greg Keoleian, professor of environment and sustainability and director of the Center for Sustainable Systems.

Wired

December 7, 2018

“Racism has not ended in Cuba, and many feel it has increased with the rise of private enterprise … But one of the revolution’s lasting achievements is to have instilled a strong national pride in Cuba’s African heritage, giving black Cubans a voice that continues to push for greater equality and the right to black self-expression,” wrote Ruth Behar, professor of anthropology.

The New York Times

December 7, 2018

“I think it remains to be seen what the truth is regarding coordination with WikiLeaks. But if the truth could be found, I think Robert Mueller will find it, and President Trump could find himself in trouble, either related to the alleged collusion or obstruction to impede the investigation,” said Barbara McQuade, professor from practice at the Law School, on the alleged link between Trump adviser Roger Stone and WikiLeaks.

The Guardian (U.K.)

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