The Board of Regents approved the following items at its Feb. 20 meeting:

Committee will focus on regional campuses

The Board of Regents will establish a new standing committee to focus on the Dearborn and Flint campuses. The new committee was announced Feb. 20 by Board of Regents Chair Ron Weiser. Weiser said Regent Michael J. Behm, a Flint-area resident, will chair the committee. The Dearborn and Flint Governance Committee will receive reports on the finances, strategies and priorities of the regional campuses. Behm said the committee would get periodic reports on such topics as student success, enrollment, human capital, research, compensation, diversity and budget priorities. The committee will meet regularly with the chancellors on the Dearborn and Flint campuses.

Auditorium at Hutchins Hall to be renovated

A $4.8 million renovation of Auditorium 100 at Hutchins Hall is planned that will address the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. It will also provide energy-efficient lighting and window shades, new seating and audio-visual equipment, acoustic treatments and accessibility improvements, including an accessible stage. The Law School and Office of the Provost will fund the project, which is scheduled for completion in the winter of 2021.

Roof to be replaced at University Hospital South

Approximately 72,000 square feet of roofing on the four buildings that make up the University Hospital South building complex will be replaced in a $7.3 million project scheduled to be completed this fall. Health System resources will fund the project.

Exterior improvements planned for Rogel Cancer Center

A project at the Rogel Cancer Center will replace 23,000 square feet of roofing and associated coping and flashing on the lower level roof, perform masonry repairs, and clean and weatherproof the entire building envelope and windows. The $4.55 million project will be funded from Health System and General Fund resources and is scheduled to be completed this fall.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

**Laura Aull, associate professor of English language and literature, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

**Denise M. Saint Arnault, professor of nursing, School of Nursing, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

Andrey Malenko, associate professor of finance, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Nadya Malenko, associate professor of finance, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Aug. 31, 2020.

Jenna Wiens, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

Jun Zhang, professor of statistics, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2020

Named professorships

*Richard D. Friedman, Alene and Allan F. Smith Professor of Law, Law School, effective Feb. 29, 2020, through Feb. 28, 2025.

Miranda D. Brown, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2020.

Chad M. Brummett, Bert N. La Du Professor of Anesthesiology Research, Medical School, effective Feb. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Kristin L. Chrouser, S. Matthew Berge, M.D. Research Professor, Medical School, effective Feb. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Gyorgyi Csankovszki, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2020.

Jonathan W. Haft, Robert H. Bartlett, M.D. Collegiate Professor of Cardiac Surgery, Medical School, effective Feb. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Norah L. Henry, Daniel F. Hayes, M.D. Breast Cancer Research Professor, Medical School, effective Feb.1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Khaled A. Mattawa, William Wilhartz Professor of English Language and Literature, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2024.

John Montgomery, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2020.

Susan Scott Parrish, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2020.

Angela Violi, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, effective July 1, 2020.

Bo Yang, J. Maxwell Chamberlain, M.D. Collegiate Professor of Cardiac Surgery, Medical School, effective Feb. 1, 2020, through Aug. 31, 2025.

Administrative appointments

*Cynthia M. Arslanian-Engoren, associate dean for faculty affairs and faculty development, School of Nursing, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

**Susan M. Collins, acting provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 30, 2020.

**Lutgarde M. Raskin, associate dean for academic programs and initiatives, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, effective Jan. 1, 2020, through June 30, 2023.

Lt. Col. Melissa R. Smith, chair, Air Force Officer Education Program, effective June 1, 2020, through May 31, 2023.

**Tamiko Strickman, associate vice president for institutional equity, Office for Institutional Equity, effective Jan. 6, 2020.

Jan Van den Bulck, director, Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences Program, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2020, through May 31, 2022.

Other transactions

Imad Shureiqi, correction to effective date of appointment, professor of internal medicine, Medical School, effective July 1, 2020.

Dearborn campus

Susan E. Alcock, professor of anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

Flint campus

James Alsup, chair, Department of Computer Science, Engineering, and Physics, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2020, through June 30, 2022.

*Donna Kay Fry, dean, College of Health Sciences, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

*Susan K. Gano-Phillips, dean, College of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2025.

*Reappointments
**Interim approval granted

Retirements

Jerald G. Bachman, distinguished research scientist, Institute for Social Research, and research professor in ISR’s Survey Research Center, Jan. 15, 2020. Bachman received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1958 from Lebanon Valley College, and a Master of Arts degree in 1961 and his Ph.D. in 1962 from the University of Pennsylvania. He held a primary research appointment in the Survey Research Center since 1962. He was promoted to senior research scientist (now research professor) in 1997. He also held appointments as a lecturer in psychology from 1963-73 and an assistant professor of higher education from 1964-65. Bachman’s research interests included drug use and attitudes about drugs; values, attitudes and behaviors of youth; military plans and experiences; and public opinion on other social issues. He initiated the nationwide Youth in Transition project in 1965. Since 1975, he has served in collaboration with Lloyd Johnston as a founding principal investigator of the Monitoring the Future study, one of the nation’s most reliable sources of information on emerging trends in illicit drug, alcohol and tobacco use among American adolescents, college students and young and middle-aged adults. Bachman has served on several national boards and panels for many prominent journals. He received U-M’s Distinguished Research Scientist Award and the University Senior Research Scientist Lectureship Award in 1998 and 1987, respectively.

Henry A. Buchtel IV, associate professor of psychology in the Medical School and associate professor of psychology in LSA, Feb. 29, 2020. Buchtel received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1964 from Dartmouth College. He earned his Master of Arts degree in 1965 and his Ph.D. in 1969 from McGill University. He carried out research in Pisa, Italy, from 1969-72; Parma, Italy, from 1975-78; London, England, from 1972-75; and Montreal, Canada, from 1978-80. Buchtel was appointed as a staff psychologist at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center in 1980. He joined U-M as an associate professor in 1981. Buchtel’s teaching included the clinical areas of proseminar, psychological theory (brain and behavior) and research methods in clinical psychology. His research interests focused on attention and memory, particularly in patients with seizure disorders. Buchtel was elected to Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Honor Society, as an associate member in 1965 and was made a full member in 1980; he served on the University of Michigan Chapter Council and on the National Board of Directors. He was a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the American Psychological Association, and a commissioner on the APA Commission on Accreditation. He was also a member and fellow of the International Neuropsychological Symposium.

John F. Greden, Rachel Upjohn Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, professor of psychiatry and research professor in the Michigan Neuroscience Institute in the Medical School, Jan. 31, 2020. Greden received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1965 and his Doctor of Medicine in 1967 from the University of Minnesota. He completed his internship at the Harbor/UCLA Medical Center and his psychiatry residency at the University of Minnesota Hospitals and the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1974. He was promoted to associate professor in 1977 and to professor in 1981. Greden was chair of the Department of Psychiatry from 1985-2007, the founder and executive director of U-M’s Comprehensive Depression Center since 1999, and the founding chair of the National Network of Depression Centers since 2007. His major research themes focused on investigating biomarkers and pharmacogenomics, as well as developing treatment strategies to prevent recurrences of depression and bipolar disorders. Greden served as president of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, the Psychiatric Research Society, the American Association of Chairs of Departments of Psychiatry, and the Board of Directors of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. He edited the Journal of Psychiatric Research, chaired the Council on Research of the American Psychiatric Association, served as a council member for the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and co-chaired the National Psychiatry Training Council. He received U-M’s James T. Neubacher Award in 2013. Then-Gov. Rick Snyder gave Greden a special commendation in 2016 for his achievements in the field of mental health.

Lawrence J. Marentette, professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, and neurosurgery in the Medical School, Jan. 31, 2020. Marentette received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1972 and his Doctor of Medicine in 1976 from Wayne State University. He completed a fellowship from 1975-76 at the Bon Secours Hospital in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, and a rotating internship from 1976-77 and an otolaryngology residency from 1977-80 at Wayne State University. After four years of private practice, Marentette completed a fellowship in maxillofacial surgery at the University of Zurich in 1985 and joined the University of Minnesota as an assistant professor in otolaryngology in 1986. He joined the University of Michigan as an associate professor in 1993 and was promoted to professor in 2003. Marentette established the Cranial Base Program in collaboration with the Department of Neurosurgery, one of the first programs in the United States to deal with lesions of the anterior cranial fossa and facial bones. Marentette also established an American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Fellowship to train fellows in the new field of skull base surgery. Marentette was named medical director of the Destination Program in 2012, which he transformed into the Clinical Design and Innovation Program. The program pairs project managers with industrial engineers and clinical staff to improve outcomes, reduce costs and improve margin across the whole spectrum of care at Michigan Medicine.

Jeffrey J. Prentis, professor of physics in the UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters, Aug. 31, 2019. Prentis received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1977 and his Ph.D. in 1982 from U-M. He joined UM-Dearborn as an assistant professor in 1984. He was promoted to associate professor in 1989 and professor in 1997. During his 35-year career, Prentis taught a full range of physics courses and designed all the mechanics laboratory experiments currently used in the introductory courses. His innovations in teaching were featured on the covers of the October 1996, April 2001 and January 2007 issues of The Physics Teacher. Prentis received UM-Dearborn’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 1997. In 2005, he received UM-Dearborn’s Distinguished Research Award for his original contributions to the study of quantum theory, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Prentis also received the U-M Office of Technology Transfer’s Inventor Recognition Award for his two inventions, the Boltzmann Machine and the Statistical Physics Demonstrator, in 2001.

Hollis D. Showalter, research professor of medicinal chemistry in the College of Pharmacy, Jan. 31, 2020. Showalter received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Virginia in 1970 and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1974. He completed a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellowship at Rice University from 1974-76. He joined Pfizer Global R&D Ann Arbor Laboratories (formerly Parke-Davis) as a scientist in 1976 and rose through the ranks to become director of chemotherapeutics chemistry and director of antibacterials chemistry. He held adjunct faculty positions at Wayne State University and U-M. Showalter retired from Pfizer in 2005 and was appointed a research professor in the U-M College of Pharmacy in 2006. He served as director from 2007-12 and co-director from 2012-16 of the U-M Valhteich Medicinal Chemistry Core (VMCC). During his time at Pfizer, Showalter was instrumental in the development of Pentostatin, which was NDA-approved in 1991 for the treatment of hairy cell leukemia, and progressed seven other compounds through preclinical and clinical studies. He was also highly influential in the creation of the VMCC, a critical component of Michigan Drug Discovery. The VMCC’s collaborations with scientists on- and off-campus resulted in many research grants, patents and publications, as well as progress toward the treatment of many different diseases. During his career, Showalter contributed more than 30 invited lectures, 136 papers and 32 reviews and book chapters, and was issued 41 U.S. patents.

Jadwiga T. Sipowska,Kasimir Fajans Collegiate Lecturer, lecturer IV in chemistry, and lecturer IV in the Comprehensive Studies Program in LSA, May 31, 2017. Sipowska received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1968 and her Master of Science degree in 1970 from Warsaw Technical University. She earned her Ph.D. in 1986 from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences. She was a postdoctoral research fellow from 1988-89 and a research assistant professor from 1989-93 at Brigham Young University. Sipowska joined UM-Flint as an assistant professor in 1993 and was promoted to associate professor in 1999. She then moved to U-M’s Ann Arbor campus as a lecturer III in 2002. She was promoted to lecturer IV in 2005 and named the Kasimir Fajans Collegiate Lecturer in 2013. Sipowska held dual appointments in the Department of Chemistry and the Comprehensive Studies Program. She primarily served as an instructor and the course coordinator for General Chemistry, a large multi-section course with enrollment of more than 1,000 students per term. Highly regarded by students, staff and faculty colleagues, Sipowska demonstrated enormous concern for the success and welfare of students and had high expectations for their performance. She was a leader in the integration of new instructional technologies in the general chemistry curriculum, including i-clickers and E-Coach. She served on various departmental and university committees, including the LSA Judiciary Committee, and was involved in academic advising in both chemistry and the Comprehensive Studies Program.

James Varani,professor of pathology in the Medical School, March 1, 2020. Varani received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1970 from St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota. He received his Master of Science degree in 1972 and Ph.D. in 1974 from the University of North Dakota. He completed postdoctoral fellowships in microbiology at the University of North Dakota from 1975-76 and the University of Connecticut from 1976-78. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1980. He was promoted to associate professor in 1984 and to professor in 1991. Varani’s career at U-M was devoted to the conduct of basic science and translational research. His primary area of interest was the regulation of growth and differentiation in the epithelium. Varani served multiple terms on the Institutional Review Board, which oversees research involving human subjects, and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, which oversees animal research. His extensive commitment to both regulatory bodies reflected an unwavering belief that ethical conduct must be a cornerstone of all research endeavors. Varani was also a member of the Office of Research Compliance and Review Oversight Committee.

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