The Board of Regents approved the following items at its Dec. 5 meeting:

Academic Institute will have new name, reporting line

The Molecular and Behavioral Neurosciences Institute will become the Michigan Neuroscience Institute, effective Jan. 1, 2020. The name change seeks to better reflect a more comprehensive description of the work of the institute and to resonate with internal and external stakeholders. In addition, the reporting line, which dates back to the original inception of the institute in 1955 as the University of Michigan Mental Health Research Institute, will change from the chair of the Department of Psychiatry to the dean of the Medical School. The new reporting line aligns the cross-school reach and vision for the institute to enable neuroscience more broadly at the university.

Work planned at Central Power Plant

Three steam-pressure regulator valves will be added to increase the reliability of the steam supply produced by the Central Power Plant for Central and Medical campus buildings. The $3.8 million project will be funded from university Utilities resources and is scheduled to be completed in the winter of 2021.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure  

Earl Lewis, professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, effective Sept. 1, 2019

Zhongming Liu, associate professor of biomedical engineering, College of Engineering and Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

Trina R. Shanks, professor of social work, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

**Imad Shureiqi, professor of internal medicine, Medical School, effective Nov. 1, 2019.

Jordan Siegel, professor of strategy, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

Named professorships

*Yan Chen, Daniel Kahneman Collegiate Professor of Information, School of Information, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2024.

*Mark S. Daskin, Clyde W. Johnson Collegiate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2024.

*Peretz P. Friedmann, François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2024.

*Margaret L. Hedstrom, Robert M. Warner Collegiate Professor of Information, School of Information, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through May 31, 2021.

*Panos Y. Papalambros, Donald C. Graham Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2024.

*Paul J. Resnick, Michael D. Cohen Collegiate Professor of Information, School of Information, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2024.

*Kentaro Toyama, W. K. Kellogg Professor of Community Information, School of Information, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2024.

Dennis S. Bernstein, James E. Knott Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2024.

Bryan R. Goldsmith, Dow Corning Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Brian C. Kiedrowski, Charles and Elizabeth Schrock Faculty Development Professor, College of Engineering, effective Dec. 1, 2019 through Nov. 30, 2022.

Danai Koutra, Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2021.

Erica E. Marsh, S. Jan Behrman Collegiate Professor of Reproductive Medicine, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

Mark D. Pearlman, Robert K. Ferguson and Virginia A. Ferguson Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

Administrative appointments

*Matthew L. Boulton, senior associate dean for global public health, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2022.

*Cleopatra H. Caldwell, chair, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Aug. 31, 2020. 

*Kevin P. Hegarty, executive vice president and chief financial officer, effective April 1, 2020. 

**Amy K. Dittmar, acting provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective Nov. 13, 2019. 

Ivan Eastin, acting associate dean for research and engagement, School for Environment and Sustainability, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through July 31, 2020.

Lorraine M. Gutierrez, associate dean for educational programs, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through Dec. 31, 2022.

George A. Mashour, chair, Department of Anesthesiology, effective Dec. 1, 2019, and Robert B. Sweet Professor of Anesthesiology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024.

Bruce A. Mueller, senior associate dean, College of Pharmacy, effective Feb. 1, 2020 through Jan. 31, 2023.

Simone Himbeault Taylor, interim vice president for student life, effective Jan. 18, 2020.

Other transactions 

Patricia J. Wittkopp, correction of tenure status to professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, with tenure, and professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology, without tenure, LSA, effective Dec. 1, 2019.

Dearborn campus

Administrative appointments

Susan E. Alcock, provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs, UM-Dearborn, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through June 30, 2025.

Flint campus

Named professorships

*Mark Simon, Hagerman Faculty Development Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, School of Management, effective Sept. 1, 2019 through June 30, 2024.

Administrative appointments

William Hull, vice chancellor for university advancement, effective Jan. 20, 2020.

Adam Lutzker, interim chair, Department of Economics, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through June 30, 2020.

Keith A. Moreland, interim provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

*Christopher A. Pearson, associate dean, College of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2025.

Bénédicte Veillet, interim chair, Department of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2020 through June 30, 2020.

Other transactions

Victoria C. Morckel, transfer of appointment and tenure to associate professor of urban planning and public policy, with tenure, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

Greg Rybarczyk, transfer of appointment and tenure to associate professor of geography, with tenure, College of Arts and Sciences, effective Jan. 1, 2020.

*Reappointments
**Interim approval granted
***Reappointment and interim approval granted

Retirements

Cesar Alaniz, clinical associate professor of pharmacy, College of Pharmacy; and clinical pharmacist, UMH Pharmacy Services, Dec. 31, 2019. Alaniz received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1980 and his Pharm.D. degree from the University of California, San Francisco in 1985. In 1986, he joined the U-M Medical Center as a clinical pharmacist specializing in adult internal medicine and continued as a clinical instructor with the College of Pharmacy. Alaniz was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 1989 and clinical associate professor in 2002. At the medical center, he transitioned to adult medicine intensive care in 1995. He also served as a clinical manager in the Department of Pharmacy from 1996-99. Alaniz is a nationally recognized leader in the area of critical care pharmacy and a dedicated clinician-educator who has had a significant impact on patient care. He was instrumental in developing and implementing pharmacokinetics monitoring and renal dosing of key drugs. Alaniz chaired U-M’s Residency Advisory Committee from 1996 to 2001 and served on many other committees. He won the College of Pharmacy’s Preceptor of the Year Award, the College of Pharmacy’s Teaching Excellence Award and Michigan Medicine’s Department of Pharmacy’s Preceptor of the Year Award. 

J. Wayne Aldridge, professor of psychology, LSA; and professor of neurosurgery, Medical School, Dec. 31, 2019. Aldridge received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1973, a Master of Science degree in 1975 and a Ph.D. in 1979 from the University of Toronto. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Alberta from 1979-82. He joined U-M as an assistant research scientist in neurology in 1982 and was promoted to associate research scientist in neurology in 1996. Aldridge was appointed associate professor of psychology in 2009 and promoted to professor of psychology and professor of neurosurgery in 2011. Aldridge’s work was at the forefront of understanding what has been called the brain’s “basal ganglia,” brain circuitry important to both movement and motivation. He used sophisticated electrophysiological techniques to monitor the firing patterns of neurons in this circuit to decode its signaling of behavior and psychological processes. His most recent research addressed individual differences that may relate to why some people are more vulnerable than others to developing addiction.

Robert M. Bradley, professor of dentistry, School of Dentistry; and professor of molecular and integrative physiology, Medical School, Dec. 31, 2019. Bradley received his B.D.S., L.D.S. degree in 1963 from the Royal Dental Hospital, University of London, and his Master of Science in Dentistry degree in 1966 from the University of Washington. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in 1970 from Florida State University. Bradley completed his postdoctoral training at the Nuffield Institute for Medical Research in Oxford, England in 1972. He became a dental house surgeon at the Royal Dental Hospital in 1963 and a dental house officer at St. Mary’s Hospital, also in London, in 1964. Bradley joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1972. He was promoted to associate professor in 1975 and professor in 1979. He has held an additional appointment in the Medical School since 1980. Bradley also served as the acting chair from 1994-95, chair from 2003-05, acting chair from 2012-13 and interim chair from 2016-17 in the School of Dentistry’s Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences. A sensory physiologist, Bradley is widely recognized for his contributions to understanding the sense of taste. He was a Fulbright Travel Scholar and a member of the Michigan Society of Senior Fellows. He received the NIH National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders’ Claud Pepper Award and the Association for Chemoreception Sciences’ Max Mozell Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Chemical Senses.

Celeste A. Brusati, professor of history of art, LSA; and professor of art, Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design, Dec. 31, 2019. Brusati received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1972 from Immaculate Heart College. She earned her Master of Arts degree in 1976 and her Ph.D. in 1984 from the University of California, Berkeley. She joined U-M as an associate professor in 1991 and was promoted to professor in 2000. Brusati’s research focuses on the art and culture of the Netherlands in the early modern period, with an emphasis on the relations between textual and pictorial commentaries on art, and the role of the pictorial arts in shaping visual experience and understanding of the social and natural world. She was on the Rackham Executive Board from 1998-2001 and received Rackham’s John D’Arms Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentoring in 2007. She chaired the History of Art Department from 2007-10. Brusati also served on several university committees and national boards, including the Board of Advisors of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. She is a recipient of the university’s Henry Russel Award and was a senior fellow in the Michigan Society of Fellows from 2007-11.

Janet I. Crayne, librarian, University Library, March 15, 2019. Crayne received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971 and her Master of Arts degree in 1976 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She received her Master of Library and Information Science degree in 1986 from the University of Rhode Island-Kingston. Crayne joined U-M as an associate librarian in 1993, became a senior associate librarian in 1998 and a librarian in 2002. Crayne spearheaded several projects that aimed to digitally preserve rare materials at a time when digital technology was in its nascent stages. She is an internationally recognized expert in the area of Slavic bibliography and electronic resources, and one of the top U.S. specialists on the Balkans. Appointed to leadership positions in organizations such as the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies and the International Congress of Slavic Librarians, Crayne worked to advance the library profession in her subject area and foster collaboration across institutions and nations. Her professional activities often converged with humanitarian efforts, such as the preservation of civic documents of the former Yugoslavia in the aftermath of war to help returning refugees document their former residency.

R. Paul Drake, Henry Smith Carhart Collegiate Professor of Space Science, and professor of climate and space sciences and engineering, College of Engineering; and professor of physics, LSA, Jan. 8, 2020. Drake received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Vanderbilt University in 1975 and his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from The John Hopkins University in 1977 and 1979, respectively. He was an associate professor from 1989-91 and a professor from 1991-93 at the University of California, Davis. Drake served as director of the Plasma Physics Research Institute at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1989-96. He joined U-M as an adjunct professor in 1996. He was appointed a visiting professor in 1996 and a professor in 1998. Drake was director of the Space Physics Research Laboratory from 1998-2002, the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics from 2008-14 and the Center for Laser Experimental Astrophysics Research from 2009-16. Drake’s research focused on plasma spectroscopy based in the areas of hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics with applications to astrophysics. He received several honors, including election as a fellow of the American Physical Society, the UROP Outstanding Undergraduate Research Mentorship Award, the AOSS Departmental Research Excellence Award, the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies’ Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, the Ted Kennedy Family Faculty Team Excellence Award and the American Nuclear Society’s Edward Teller Award. 

Jessica Kimlat Fogel, professor of dance, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, Dec. 31, 2019. Fogel received her Bachelor of Arts degree in dance in 1977 from Barnard College, Columbia University, and her Master of Arts degree in dance education in 1983 from Teachers College, Columbia University. Fogel joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1985. She was promoted to associate professor in 1990 and professor in 2002. Fogel’s choreography has been produced nationally and internationally since 1974. She was the artistic director of Jessica Fogel and Dancers in New York City and is a founding member and artistic director of Ann Arbor Dance Works. Her multilayered, interdisciplinary dances feature collaborations with visual artists, composers, scientists, writers, actors and designers, often merging movement, text, music and digital projections. She received the Michigan Choreographers Festival Award, a Lifetime of Achievement in the Arts Award from the Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit and an Award of Excellence from the National Fine Arts Video Competition. Fogel played an important role in the design and vision of the new dance building and provided exemplary leadership as the Department of Dance’s chair and director of graduate studies.

Elliot H. Gertel, Irving M. Hermelin Curator of Judaica and senior associate librarian, University Library, Dec. 30, 2018. Gertel received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Marlboro College in 1973, his Master of Philosophy degree from Oxford University in 1988 and his Master of Science in Library Science degree from the University of Kentucky in 1990. He joined U-M as an associate librarian and the inaugural Irving M. Hermelin Curator of Judaica in 1999. He was promoted to senior associate librarian in 2003. Gertel expanded the Judaica collection into one of the most significant of such collections in the U.S., with more than 150,000 items. He provided outstanding research and instruction services to faculty, curated Judaica exhibits on campus, taught an advanced Yiddish class and facilitated a weekly Yiddish conversation group. Elliot served in various leadership capacities in the Association of Jewish Libraries and chaired the Jewish Information Committee of the American Library Association Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table. He also served on the ALA Reference and User Services Association’s Sophie Brody Medal Committee.

Raymond J. Hutchinson, professor of pediatrics, Medical School, Dec. 31, 2019. Hutchinson received a Bachelor of Science degree from Boston College in 1969, a B.M.S. from Dartmouth Medical School in 1971, an M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School in 1973 and a Master of Science degree from U-M in 1989. He completed his pediatric residency at the New England Medical Center in Boston, Mass. in 1975, followed by an oncology fellowship at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in 1978. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1978. He was promoted to associate professor in 1986 and professor in 1993. Hutchinson is known for his commitment to clinical excellence, research and service, as well as his mentorship of the next generation of physicians. He held leadership roles within the Department of Pediatrics and the Medical School, including clinical director of the Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Program from 1991-2004, co-chair of IRBMED from 2004-06, clinical director of pediatric hematology/oncology from 2005-09, assistant dean for research regulatory affairs in 2006, associate dean for research regulatory affairs from 2006-08 and associate dean for regulatory affairs from 2008-19. He was involved in developing novel therapies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Hodgkin’s lymphoma in children. He was listed among “Best Doctors in America” and “America’s Top Doctors for Cancer” by Castle Connolly and the American Registry.  

Judith T. Irvine, Edward Sapir Distinguished University Professor of Linguistic Anthropology and professor of anthropology, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Irvine received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1966 from Harvard University, and her Ph.D. in 1973 from the University of Pennsylvania. She served on the faculty of Brandeis University from 1972-99. She joined U-M as a professor in 1999. Irvine’s research topics included the role of language in the social life of speakers, ideologies and politics of language, and language’s engagement in social history. She conducted ethnographic and sociolinguistic research among the Wolof people of Senegal, Wolof speakers in the U.S., and isiZulu speakers in South Africa. Irvine chaired the Department of Anthropology from 2006-09 and served on several departmental committees. She was associate director of the African Studies Center from 2016-17. The recipient of various grants and awards, Irvine was an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as the National Academy of Sciences.

Gordon L. Kane, Victor Weisskopf Distinguished University Professor of Physics and professor of physics, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Kane received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1958 from the University of Minnesota. He received his Master of Science in 1961 and his Ph.D. in 1963 from the University of Illinois. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1965, and was promoted to associate professor in 1969 and professor in 1975. Kane has had a distinguished career as a leader in connecting new theories of particle physics to experiment. He has also been a leader in connecting supersymmetry, a theory motivated from both string theory and particle theory perspectives, to experimentally verifiable consequences. He served as director of the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics from 2005 to 2011. He was a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Institute of Physics. The American Physical Society awarded him the Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize and the J.J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics.

John C. Mitani, professor of anthropology, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Mitani received his A.B. degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1976 and his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Davis in 1984. From 1984 to 1989, he was a postdoctoral fellow and assistant professor at The Rockefeller University. In 1989, he was appointed assistant research zoologist in the Department of Zoology at the University of California, Davis. He joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1990. He was promoted to associate professor in 1993 and professor in 2002. Mitani conducted fieldwork investigating the behavior of apes. He pioneered the use of experiments to examine the behavior of wild gibbons and orangutans before conducting research on bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas. Mitani was recognized with a Presidential Faculty Fellowship from the National Science Foundation. He was also a fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and Animal Behavior Society. Mitani received several teaching awards from LSA and the AMOCO Undergraduate Teaching Award. In addition, he served on many anthropology department committees and as its associate chair. Mitani was elected a senior fellow of the Michigan Society of Fellows in 2007. 

Sayoko E. Moroi, Jerome Jacobson Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, and professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences, Medical School, Jan. 5, 2020. Moroi received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University in 1982 and her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from The Ohio State University in 1989. She completed an internal medicine internship from 1989-90, an ophthalmology residency from 1990-93 and a glaucoma research fellowship from 1993-94 at Duke University. Moroi joined U-M as a fellow and lecturer in 1994. She was promoted to assistant professor in 1995, associate professor in 2004 and professor in 2012. An internationally recognized clinician-scientist, Moroi has a diverse research portfolio in pharmacology, complex cataract surgery, glaucoma, epidemiology, ophthalmic genetics and precision medicine. As section leader since 2012, she oversaw the growth of the glaucoma faculty to 15 as well as raised funds to endow a professorship, renovate the resident education facilities and conduct research. Her notable honors include the 2018 Robert N. Shaffer Lecture sponsored by the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Glaucoma Research Foundation. 

Frederick J. Morrison, professor of psychology, LSA; and research professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, Dec. 31, 2019. Morrison received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto in 1966 and his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1971. He joined U-M as a professor in 2001. Morrison’s distinguished career crossed the interdisciplinary boundaries of developmental psychology and education. His research examined the nature and sources of children’s cognitive, literacy and social development over the school transition period. The research had important practical implications for teachers and schools through work on intervention programs designed to produce effective individualized instruction for young children. Morrison is a leader in the development, implementation and evaluation of interventions to improve the academic success of disadvantaged children. He collaborated with public policy agencies to develop, implement and test the interventions in the classroom. 

Steven Mullaney, professor of English language and literature, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Mullaney received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Colorado in 1973 and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1982. He joined U-M as an associate professor in 1987 and was promoted to professor in 2015. Mullaney is a pre-eminent scholar in the fields of Shakespeare and early modern drama. He wrote the groundbreaking book “The Place of the Stage: License, Play and Power in Renaissance England.” His second book, “The Reformation of Emotions in the Age of Shakespeare,” was a major work of scholarly innovation. His many articles on Shakespearean and early modern drama have greatly influenced a wide variety of fields. From 2002-05, Mullaney served as the director of graduate studies in the Department of English Language and Literature. From 2013-18, he was a co-investigator on a major international SSHRC grant, “Early Modern Conversions: Religions, Cultures, Cognitive Ecologies.” 

Anthony W. Opipari, Jr., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, Medical School, Nov. 30, 2019. Opipari received his Bachelor of Science degree from Wayne State University in 1986, and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from U-M in 1994. He completed his internship from 1994-95 and his residency from 1995-98 in obstetrics and gynecology at U-M. He joined U-M as a lecturer in 1998. He was promoted to assistant professor in 2000 and associate professor in 2006. An internationally respected physician-scientist, Opipari’s research focused on the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches and the development of novel therapeutic agents that use immune regulation to treat cancers and immune-mediated diseases. He served as the senior director of biology at Lycera Inc., the chief medical officer at First Wave Biosciences and the director of translational science and medicine at IFM Therapeutics. Opipari also held leadership roles in the department, including chair of the Committee on Appointments, Promotions, and Tenure, associate chair for research and associate chair for faculty career development. He served on the Career Advisory Committee for the Medical Scientist Training Program. Opipari received the Medical Student Teaching Award from the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the Silver Speculum Resident Teaching Award from U-M obstetrics and gynecology residents. 

Marion Perlmutter, professor of psychology, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Perlmutter received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Syracuse University in 1970, her Master of Science degree from the State University of New York-Albany in 1971 and her Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 1976. Perlmutter began her career at the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development in 1976. She joined U-M as a professor of psychology in LSA and research scientist in the Institute of Gerontology and the Center for Human Growth and Development in 1985. Perlmutter was among the first scholars to explore both child development and adult aging, and to address issues of both growth and decline across the lifespan. She contributed in important ways to understanding cognitive aging. Her career was also devoted to teaching psychology, and she developed one of the first undergraduate courses in adult development and aging as well as a first-year seminar on twins and what they can teach us about identity, relationships, genes and environment. 

Alexander Potts, Max Loehr Collegiate Professor of the History of Art and professor of history of art, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Potts received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the University of London in 1978. He joined U-M as chair of the Department of the History of Art, Max Loehr Collegiate Professor of the History of Art, and professor of history of art in 2002. Widely regarded as a leading voice in the history of art specializing in modern and contemporary subjects, Potts is deeply engaged with questions of method, historiography, artistic media and realism with particular expertise in the art of Western Europe and North America. His more than 130 articles, essays and reviews have profoundly impacted scholars both within and outside the field of modern art. He received several awards and honors, including the Slade Lectureship of Fine Art at Oxford University and the Kirk Varnedoe Visiting Professorship at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. He also received the Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award from the College Art Association.

Paul D. Reingold, clinical professor of law, Law School, Dec. 31, 2019. Reingold received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Amherst College in 1974 and his Juris Doctor degree from Boston University School of Law in 1977. After serving as a legal services attorney specializing in cases against the state and federal governments, he joined U-M as a clinical assistant professor in 1983. He was promoted to clinical professor in 1990. Reingold served as acting clinic director from 1983-89 and as interim associate dean for clinical affairs in 2013. He directed and taught for several years in the Michigan Clinical Law Program, the Law School’s general practice civil-criminal litigation clinic. Under his supervision, law students tried cases in the local district, circuit, probate and federal courts. Reingold served on the executive committee of the Clinical Law Section of the Association of American Law Schools and was a founding member of the editorial board of the Clinical Law Review. He was elected a fellow of the Michigan State Bar Foundation and served on the executive board of Michigan’s Institute of Continuing Legal Education. He received the State Bar of Michigan’s Champion of Justice Award and the Law School’s L. Hart Wright Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Jennifer Robertson, professor of anthropology and women’s studies and professor of history of art, LSA; and professor of art and design, the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design, Dec. 31, 2019. Robertson received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Cornell University, a Master of Arts degree in 1977 from the University of Hawai’i, and a Master of Arts degree in 1983 and a Ph.D. in 1985 from Cornell University. She joined U-M as an associate professor in 1991 and was promoted to professor in 1997. Robertson was a faculty affiliate of the Robotics Institute and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. In addition to directing the Center for Japanese Studies, she served as associate chair of the Department of Anthropology, and thrice chaired the socio-cultural anthropology subfield. An anthropologist and historian, Robertson’s area of specialty is Japan, where she lived and worked for nearly 25 years. Her more than 80 articles addressed topics as diverse as votive art, eugenics and “hemato-nationalism.” Her work was supported by the Guggenheim, NEH, ACLS, Abé and Japan Foundations, several Fulbrights, SSRC, Wissenschaftskolleg (Berlin), Wenner-Gren and others, including invited professorships in the U.S., Japan and Israel.

Arlene W. Saxonhouse, Caroline Robbins Collegiate Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies and professor of political science and women’s studies, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Saxonhouse received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Oberlin College in 1965 and her Master of Philosophy and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University in 1970 and 1972, respectively. She joined U-M as an assistant professor in 1972. Saxonhousewas promoted to associate professor in 1978 and professor in 1984. She was chair of the Department of Political Science from 1990-93. She also had faculty affiliations with the Department of Women’s Studies and the Department of Classical Studies. Saxonhouse published widely in the areas of classical and early political thought and women in the history of political thought, andmade notable contributions to the study of women in works of political theory. She received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and also received a Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award from U-M. She was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. Additionally, Saxonhouse had fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University.  

Susan L. Siegfried, Denise Riley Collegiate Professor of the History of Art and Women’s Studies, professor of history of art, and professor of women’s studies, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Siegfried received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Wellesley College in 1971. She received a Master of Arts degree in 1976 and a Ph.D. in 1980 from Harvard University. She also has an honorary Master of Arts degree from Oxford University. Siegfried served as assistant professor at Northwestern University from 1980 to 1984, research projects manager for the Getty Art History Information Program from 1987 to 1995 and professor of art history at the University of Leeds from 1996 to 2002. She joined U-M as a professor in 2002. A pre-eminent figure in the field of 18th and 19th century European art, Siegfried authored two groundbreaking books and co-authored another, while co-editing a major anthology and publishing some 50 articles, book chapters and reviews. She curated three important museum exhibitions and is the world’s leading authority on the work of Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres and Louis-Léopold Boilly. She has highlighted issues of gender analysis in her research and teaching, an approach sustained by her joint appointment in the Women’s Studies Program, where she served as acting director. 

Sidonie Smith, Lorna G. Goodison Distinguished University Professor of English and Women’s Studies, professor of English language and literature, and professor of women’s studies, LSA, Dec. 31, 2019. Smith received her Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees from U-M in 1966. She received her Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University in 1971. She U-M as a professor in 1996 and is a towering figure in the study of life writing. She is the author or co-author of nine monographs and has edited or co-edited six collections, two anthologies and a memoir. She is recognized as a founder, theorist and historian of her field who continues to make important interventions, including regularly updating her influential guide, “Reading Autobiography.” Smith has also played a national and international role in advocating and planning for the future of the humanities, most notably through her 2016 open-access book, “Manifesto for the Humanities: Transforming Doctoral Education in Good Enough Times,” her work with the Mellon Foundation, and as president of the Modern Language Association. At U-M, Smith chaired the women’s studies and English departments and directed the Institute for the Humanities.

Janice L. Stumpf, clinical associate professor of pharmacy, College of Pharmacy; and clinical pharmacist, UMH Pharmacy Services, Dec. 31, 2019. Stumpf received her associate in arts degree in chemistry from Southwestern College in Chula Vista, Calif. in 1981, and her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of California, San Francisco in 1986. She went on to complete a one-year residency in clinical pharmacy at U-M Hospitals, during which time she was appointed as an adjunct clinical instructor in the College of Pharmacy. In 1986, she accepted a position at the U-M Medical Center as a clinical pharmacist specializing in adult internal medicine and continued as a clinical instructor in the College of Pharmacy. She was promoted to clinical assistant professor in 1988 and clinical associate professor in 2000. At the medical center, she transitioned to the Drug Information Service and Medication Use Policy Center in 1994, where she served as acting co-director until 1995. Stumpf is a nationally recognized leader and clinician-educator who played an influential role in shaping medication use policy and improving patient care at Michigan Medicine. She published the highly regarded Michigan Drug Letter and Pharmacy Newsletter and the hospital’s formulary. 

Peter A. Ward, Godfrey D. Stobbe Professor of Pathology and professor of pathology, Medical School, Jan. 1, 2020. Ward received his Bachelor of Science and M.D. degrees from U-M in 1958 and 1960, respectively. He completed an internal medicine internship at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, New York on the New York University service from 1960 to 1961. He returned to U-M to complete an anatomic pathology residency from 1961-63. Afterward, Ward completed a two-year immunopathology postdoctoral fellowship at Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in La Jolla, Calif.  From 1965-71, he was chief of the Immunobiology Branch at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology at the Walter Reed Army Hospital. From 1965-67, he was a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. He served as a professor of pathology from 1971-80 and chair of the Department of Pathology from 1973-80 at the University of Connecticut Health Center. He joined U-M as professor and chair in 1980. As chair of the Medical School’s Department of Pathology for 25 years, Ward played an instrumental role in the growth of the faculty to 100 and expansion of the research enterprise, as well as the substantial increases in research grant support from the National Institutes of Health. He served as president of a number of societies, including the American Society for Investigative Pathology, the Society for Leukocyte Biology and the Universities Associated for Research and Education in Pathology. In the early 1990s, he became a member of the National Academy of Medicine. 

John A. Williams, Horace W. Davenport Collegiate Professor of Physiology, professor of molecular and integrative physiology, and professor of internal medicine, Medical School, Dec. 31, 2019. Williams received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Central Washington State in 1962 and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington in 1968. After completing his postdoctoral training, he joined the University of California, San Francisco faculty as an assistant professor in 1973. He was promoted to associate professor in 1974 and professor in 1979. Williams joined U-M as a professor and chair of the Department of Physiology in 1987. The department flourished under Williams’ leadership and became one of the top physiology departments in the nation. He was chair for more than 20 years. Williams also served on the Dean’s Advisory Committee, the Policy Committee for the Michigan Medical Scientist Training Program and the Medical School Executive Committee. He was the first chair of the Endowment for the Basic Sciences Operating Committee. In addition, he had leadership roles in the Michigan Comprehensive Diabetes Center and the Michigan Gastrointestinal Peptide Center Executive Committee. A leader in the study of the exocrine pancreas, Williams served as editor for five scientific journals and as president of the American Physiological Society and the American Pancreatic Association. Awards include the U-M Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, the Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology’s Distinguished Service Award, the U-M Distinguished Faculty Lecture in Biomedical Research and the American Gastroenterological Association’s Distinguished Achievement Award. Williams is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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