The new Biological Sciences Building, which is also the new home for the Museum of Natural History, was in the spotlight recently with dedication ceremonies for both facilities. Check out photos from the April 11 event at the BSB and the April 14 grand opening of the museum.

The Museum of Natural History celebrated its new location in the Biological Sciences Building with a ribbon-cutting ceremony before the general public explored the new space April 14. To help with the festivities were, from left, a pterosaur, docent Joyce Ho, Charlie Baker, 8; his brother Jack, 12; Museum Director Amy Harris; Owen Lauffer, 7; Aida Aeñasoaie, 8; and Terry the T-Rex. (Photo by Leisa Thompson)

Mixing old with new, the Museum of Natural History mastodons and the modern architecture were the first to greet the eager visitors. (Photo by Leisa Thompson)

Lilikoi von May, 4, gives the Museum of Natural History’s allosaurus a taste of her stuffed snowy owl, delighting her sister Isabella, 6, during the official opening of the museum in its new space. (Photo by Leisa Thompson)

Overseeing the placement of a time capsule in the base of a statue at the entrance to the Biological Sciences Building on April 11 are, from left, Mark Ramirez, graduate student in the School of Information; Matt Friedman, director and associate curator of the Museum of Paleontology, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences; Robert Denver, professor and chair of molecular, cellular and developmental biology; Diarmaid Ó Foighil, professor and chair of ecology and evolutionary biology, and curator of the Museum of Zoology; and Amy Harris, director of the Museum of Natural History. (Photo by Scott C. Soderberg, Michigan Photography)

Preparing to cut a ceremonial ribbon to formally dedicate the new Biological Sciences Building are, from left, Amy Harris, director of the Museum of Natural History; Robert Denver, professor and chair of molecular, cellular and developmental biology; Elizabeth R. Cole, interim dean of LSA; President Mark Schlissel; Diarmaid Ó Foighil, professor and chair of ecology and evolutionary biology, and curator of the Museum of Zoology; Matt Friedman, director and associate curator of the Museum of Paleontology, and associate professor of earth and environmental sciences; and Knute Nadelhoffer, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and director of the U-M Biological Station. (Photo by Scott C. Soderberg, Michigan Photography)

The skeleton of a mastodon watches over the visitors celebrating the dedication of the new Biological Sciences Building. (Photo by Scott C. Soderberg, Michigan Photography)

Tags: