University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

November 20, 2017

Research

May 24, 2017

Political violence gets under kids' skin — and may stay

When children are victims of political violence, they tend to become more aggressive with members of their own peer group, and that aggression tends to linger as they age, according to a University of Michigan study.

May 11, 2017

Study shows kids want input before parents share about them online

Soccer games, family vacations and reports of good grades are OK for social media sharing. Posts with baby photos or references to punishments and significant others — not so much.

This is what children said when asked what their parents can share about them online, according to research from the School of Information.

May 10, 2017

New campaign aims to strengthen research safety at U-M

As part of an ongoing initiative to strengthen the university's culture of laboratory and research safety, the U-M Office of Research and the Department of Environment, Health & Safety have launched a new campaign to boost awareness and effectiveness of safety practices.

May 8, 2017

U-M researchers identify new heartburn target

Acid reflux and heartburn affect more than 20 percent of the U.S. population, but common medications to treat the disease might not work for a large portion of people who suffer from the diseases.

April 27, 2017

Public, including gun owners, oppose allowing guns in most venues

As lawmakers across the country debate and enact legislation allowing people to carry guns in more public places, University of Michigan research shows that even those who own guns favor placing restrictions on the places firearms are allowed.

April 27, 2017

For many women, body image and sex life may suffer after episiotomy

Women who have episiotomies after childbirth reported having poorer body image and less satisfying sex lives than women who tear and heal naturally.

The University of Michigan study challenges the conventional thinking that an episiotomy yields a more aesthetically and visually pleasing repair than tearing naturally during childbirth.

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