University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

October 21, 2017

In The News

October 3, 2017

"Typically, if you really want to mobilize people to act, you don't scare the hell out of them and convince them that the situation is hopeless," said Andrew Hoffman, professor of management and organizations, and environment and sustainability, commenting on the way climate change is often depicted in Hollywood movies.

The New York Times

October 3, 2017

Scott Page, professor of complex systems, economics and political science, was interviewed about the implications of his research on diversity and collective decision-making, as presented in his new book, "The Diversity Bonus."

The Washington Post

October 2, 2017

"The historical knock on the arts, if you will, is that we're too precious, that we’ve put ourselves in the ivory tower, and we don't like engaging with people in a real way around societal or substantive issues. And I actually believe that our role is exactly that. It is, yes, to present great performing arts, but to do it in a very mindful way, and to do it in a way that says we are part of the fabric of the community in direct and indirect ways," said Matthew VanBesien, president of the University Musical Society.

Michigan Radio

October 2, 2017

"Most modern constructions and modern codes can sustain earthquake loads pretty well. It's the older buildings, constructed under older codes or assumptions, that … were not necessarily designed for the same forces," said Jason McCormick, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering.

Business Insider/Futurism

October 2, 2017

Max Shtein, professor of materials science and engineering, macromolecular science and engineering, and art and design, developed a technique to print multiple medications at once onto a disposable strip or patch.

Engadget

September 29, 2017

Jennifer Bragg-Gresham, assistant research scientist at the Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center, commented on a new study linking air pollution and kidney disease: "These new findings support that even low levels of fine particulate matter air pollution across the US can increase the risk of serious kidney problems."

Reuters

September 29, 2017

In a story about making tax returns simple enough to file on a post card, Joel Slemrod, professor of economics, said the idea might have been more appealing many years ago when it was first proposed: "I think the postcard thing was at one time a nice visual."

Detroit Free Press

September 29, 2017

Preeti Malani, professor of internal medicine, was quoted in a story saying one in three adults take sleep aids: "Although sleep problems can happen at any age and for many reasons, they can't be cured by taking a pill, either prescription, over-the-counter or herbal, no matter what the ads on TV say."

United Press International

September 28, 2017

In a story about co-working spaces, Gretchen Spreitzer, professor of organizational behavior and human resource management, says "qualitative research does show that people feel like they're more productive in the company of others that they trust, rather than just sitting in a coffee shop."

National Public Radio

September 28, 2017

Steven Katz, professor of internal medicine and of health management and policy, was featured in a story about breast cancer treatment options: "The majority of patients strongly defer to their surgeons — perhaps because of the complexity of the treatment choices and clinical information."

Reuters

Pages