University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

December 17, 2017

In The News

February 27, 2014

Research by Aneel Karnani, associate professor of strategy, suggests that a Coca-Cola bottling plant in India has contributed to the depletion of local groundwater resources.

Business Standard (India)

February 26, 2014

Stefan Szymanski, professor of sport management, was interviewed about what will happen to Sochi, Russia, and its Olympic village now that the Winter Games are over.

National Public Radio

February 26, 2014

Comments by Samuel Bagenstos, professor of law, were featured in a story about whether or not "religious freedom" laws could be a license to discriminate.

MSNBC

February 26, 2014

Michael Traugott, professor of communication studies and political science, was quoted in an article about the likelihood of Debbie Dingell running for her husband John's congressional seat when he retires.

Detroit Free Press

February 25, 2014

Scott Kurashige, professor of American culture, and Gloria House, professor of humanities and African and African American studies, were interviewed about Grace Lee Boggs, a 98-year-old Detroit activist from the time of Malcolm X and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

MSNBC

February 25, 2014

Nicholas Delbanco, professor of English, wrote a review of Lawrence Buell's new book, "The Dream of the Great American Novel."

Chicago Tribune

February 25, 2014

Huda Akil, professor of neurosciences and psychiatry, was quoted about the negative effects solitary confinement can have on a prisoner's brain.

CNN

February 24, 2014

Regarding the efficacy of federal programs to prevent psychological disorders in military veterans, Kenneth Warner, professor of public health, said: "A lot of programs don’t have any good data behind them. We remain uncertain about which approaches work and which ones are ineffective."

Los Angeles Times

February 24, 2014

Research by Dr. Erin Bonar, assistant professor of psychiatry, suggests that people who engage in excessive tanning may have mental health issues.

UPI

February 24, 2014

"High wages make your employees better customers. You're putting this money in the hands of people who are most definitely going to spend it. They're not socking it away in mutual funds. The money goes back into the economy pretty quickly," said Wallace Hopp, professor of technology and operations.

The Washington Post

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