University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

July 15, 2018

In The News

June 13, 2018

Research by Z. Morley Mao, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and EECS doctoral student Qi Alred Chen found that next-generation transportation systems are relatively easy to trick: “Just one car that’s transmitting fake data can cause enormous traffic jams, and several attack cars could work together to shut down whole areas.”

Scientific American

June 13, 2018

John Cheney-Lippold, associate professor of American culture, said that as their industry struggles, dictionaries have had a particular interest in promoting their brands since President Trump catalyzed a post-truth news environment: “They are trying valiantly to reassert themselves as the epistemic chiefs of the world.”

The New York Times

June 6, 2018

"It's striking in its narrowness. The court found a way to rule for the baker without making the First Amendment a license to exempt oneself from anti-discrimination laws," said Richard Primus, professor of law, on the Supreme Court ruling in favor of a Colorado baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple.

Newsweek

June 6, 2018

"Our immigration system has been weaponized to disrupt and destroy 'undesirable' reproduction and family-making," co-wrote William Lopez, research fellow at LSA's National Center for Institutional Diversity and the School of Public Health.

HuffPost

June 6, 2018

Elizabeth Tibbetts, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was quoted in a story about how guppies darken their eyes when they get angry: "Eye color is one of those traits that's easy for us to ignore. … There is a whole world of animal social signals that humans overlook."

The Atlantic

May 30, 2018

"While greater public awareness of implicit bias can't hurt, there is no way to ensure that callers will always make justified requests. For that reason, policymakers must consider reforms for call-takers, not just call-makers," writes Jessica Gillooly, a doctoral student in public policy and sociology, on the recent rash of racially driven 911 calls.

The Washington Post

May 30, 2018

"Both of these rivers are poster children for what climate change is doing to the Southwest," said Jonathan Overpeck, dean of the School for Environment and Sustainability, commenting on the reduction of water in the Rio Grande and Colorado rivers due to warming temperatures.

The New York Times

May 30, 2018

Sarah Mills, a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School for Public Policy, discussed DTE Energy's decision to invest in natural gas instead of renewable energy sources and what it means for Michigan's energy infrastructure.

Michigan Radio's Stateside

May 23, 2018

"Summer camps represent a unique opportunity for social-emotional development by allowing children to separate from their usual family and peer environment while learning new skills or spending time outdoors. If you want your child to have an experience disconnected from social media, look for camps whose policies match that in order to establish the rustic experience you're looking for," said Ashley DeHudy, instructor in pediatrics and communicable diseases at Mott Children's Hospital.

U.S. News & World Report

May 23, 2018

"I think people have said stupid things to one another for a long time. What's changed is our ability to record and share it and our ability to react to those recordings," said Clifford Lampe, professor of information. "Having a recording of your own and being aware of what happens when somebody is recording you and how easy that is to share, is an essential literacy that people need to develop."

CBC (Canada)

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