University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

June 25, 2017

U-M, Toyota Research Institute partner in $2.4M battery project

March 31, 2017

U-M, Toyota Research Institute partner in $2.4M battery project

Topic: Research

With a $2.4 million investment from the Toyota Research Institute, University of Michigan researchers will develop computer simulation tools to predict automotive battery performance.

The project is part of a four-year, $35 million investment with research entities, universities and companies on research that uses artificial intelligence to help accelerate the design and discovery of advanced materials, TRI has announced.

Initially, the program will aim to help revolutionize materials science and identify new advanced battery materials and fuel cell catalysts that can power future zero-emissions and carbon-neutral vehicles.

"Toyota recognizes that artificial intelligence is a vital basic technology that can be leveraged across a range of industries, and we are proud to use it to expand the boundaries of materials science," said Eric Krotkov, TRI chief science officer.

"Accelerating the pace of materials discovery will help lay the groundwork for the future of clean energy and bring us even closer to achieving Toyota's vision of reducing global average new-vehicle CO2 emissions by 90 percent by 2050."

The project, under the auspices of the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering at U-M, will combine mathematical models of the atomic nature and physics of materials with artificial intelligence.

"At the University of Michigan, we look forward to collaborating with TRI to advance computational materials science using machine learning principles," said principal investigator Krishna Garikipati, professor of mechanical engineering and mathematics.

Also involved from U-M are Vikram Gavini, associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and engineering, and Karthik Duraisamy, assistant professor of aerospace engineering.

"The timing and goals of this program are well-aligned with the paradigm of data-enabled science that we have been promoting via the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering, and the Center for Data-Driven Computational Physics," Duraisamy said.

The U-M project will use the ConFlux cluster, an innovative, new computing platform that enables computational simulations to interface with large datasets.

In addition to U-M, TRI's newly funded research projects include collaborations with Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University at Buffalo, University of Connecticut and the U.K.-based materials science company Ilika. TRI is also in ongoing discussions with additional research partners.

Research will merge advanced computational materials modeling, new sources of experimental data, machine learning and artificial intelligence in an effort to reduce the time scale for new materials development from a period that has historically been measured in decades.

Research programs will follow parallel paths, working to identify new materials for use in future energy systems as well as to develop tools and processes that can accelerate the design and development of new materials more broadly, according to TRI.

In support of these goals, TRI will partner on projects focused on areas including:

• The development of new models and materials for batteries and fuel cells.

• Broader programs to pursue novel uses of machine learning, artificial intelligence and materials informatics approaches for the design and development of new materials.

• New automated materials discovery systems that integrate simulation, machine learning, artificial intelligence or robotics.

Accelerating materials science discovery represents one of four core focus areas for TRI, which was launched in 2015 with mandates to also enhance auto safety with automated technologies, increase access to mobility for those who otherwise cannot drive and help translate outdoor mobility technology into products for indoor mobility.