University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

September 23, 2018

Regents Roundup — May 2018

May 17, 2018

Regents Roundup — May 2018

The following items were approved by the Board Regents at its meeting Thursday.

Renovations planned at East Hall

Approximately 8,800 gross square feet of Department of Psychology space at East Hall will be renovated to create a more efficient shared-lab configuration, increasing faculty labs from eight to twelve. The project will also transform existing workspaces into open shared spaces to foster communication, community and collaboration. The $4.4 million project is being funded by LSA and is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2019.

Regents approve application for liquor license

The regents approved an application for a Class C License and Catering by Sodexo Management Inc. for the International Champions Cup Soccer Tournament scheduled to take place July 28 at Michigan Stadium. Relevent Sports, a division of RSE Ventures, requested that U-M obtain a Concessionaire's Application for a Liquor License for use during the event. Relevent will contract for the concessions with Sodexo, the university's current concessionaire for athletic venues. Michigan law permits the Michigan Liquor Control Commission to issue a license for the sale of alcohol at an event such as this.

UM-Flint unit name to change

The School of Health Professions at UM-Flint will become the College of Health Sciences effective July 1. The new name will more accurately reflect the diverse scope and stature of the programs within the unit. It also aligns with strategic initiatives within the unit to enhance teaching, expand research and community engagement, and develop new programs. Changing the unit name from a school to a college is consistent with other units of health science programs within the state universities of Michigan.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

David A. Nordsletten, associate professor of biomedical engineering, Medical School and College of Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2018.

Brendan Nyhan, professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, effective Sept. 1, 2018.

Named professorships

Kathryn Babayan, Richard Hudson Research Professor of History, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2018.

*James R. Baker Jr., Ruth Dow Doan Professor of Biologic Nanotechnology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2019.

*Ruma Banerjee, Vincent Massey Collegiate Professor of Biological Chemistry, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Liliana Borcea, Peter Field Collegiate Professor of Mathematics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Carol J. Boyd, Deborah J. Oakley Collegiate Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through May 31, 2019.

*Charles L. Brooks III, Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Maria Castro, R.C. Schneider Collegiate Professor, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

Lucia H.S. Cevidanes, Drs. Thomas M. and Doris Graber Endowed Professor of Dentistry, School of Dentistry, effective June 1, 2018 through May 31, 2023.

*Daniel A. Crane, Frederick Paul Furth Sr. Professor of Law, Law School, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023.

*G. Michael Deeb, Herbert Sloan Collegiate Professor of Cardiac Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*John O. DeLancey, Norman F. Miller Professor of Gynecology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Susan J. Douglas, Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

James Douglas Engel, Elizabeth C. Crosby Collegiate Professor, Medical School, effective May 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*Leela M.P. Fernandes, Glenda Dickerson Collegiate Professor of Women's Studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Paul G. Gauger, William J. Fry Professor of Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Theodore G. Goodson III, Richard Barry Bernstein Collegiate Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Deborah L. Gumucio, James Douglas Engel Collegiate Professorship, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Ellen D. Katz, Ralph W. Aigler Professor of Law, Law School, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023.

*Edward Webb Keane Jr., George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Anthropology, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Vikramaditya S. Khanna, William W. Cook Professor of Law, Law School, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023.

*Valerie A. Kivelson, Thomas N. Tentler Collegiate Professor of History, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Pedro Lowenstein, Richard Schneider Collegiate Professor, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Anna K. Mapp, Edwin Vedejs Collegiate Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Andrei S. Markovits, Karl W. Deutsch Collegiate Professor of Comparative Politics and German Studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Adam J. Matzger, Charles G. Overberger Collegiate Professor of Chemistry, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Nina A. Mendelson, Joseph L. Sax Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023.

*James D. Morrow, A.F.K. Organski Collegiate Professor of World Politics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Lisa A. Nakamura, Gwendolyn Calvert Baker Collegiate Professor of American Culture and Screen Arts, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Rachel R. Neis, Jean and Samuel Frankel Professor of Rabbinic Literature, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*William J. Novak, Charles F. and Edith J. Clyne Professor of Law, Law School, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023.

*John M. O'Shea, Emerson F. Greenman Collegiate Professor of Anthropological Archaeology, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Kathy Sue O'Shea, Crosby-Kahn Collegiate Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

Jonathan T. Overpeck, William B. Stapp Collegiate Professor of Environmental Education, School for Environment and Sustainability, effective June 1, 2018.

*Francis D. Pagani, Otto Gago, M.D. Professor of Cardiac Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Scott E. Page, Leonid Herwicz Collegiate Professor of Political Science, Complex Systems and Economics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Himanshu J. Patel, Joe D. Morris, M.D. Collegiate Professor of Cardiac Surgery, Medical School, effective Sept.1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Martin J. Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy, Robert W. Parry Collegiate Professor of Chemistry and Biophysics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Yongbin Ruan, William Fulton Collegiate Professor of Mathematics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Oren Sagher, William F. Chandler Collegiate Professor of Neurosurgery, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

Lonnie D. Shea, Steven A. Goldstein Collegiate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, effective April 1, 2018 through March 31, 2023.

Elizabeth K. Speliotes, Keith S. Henley, M.D. Collegiate Professor of Gastroenterology, Medical School, effective May 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Jason R. Spence, H. Marvin Pollard Collegiate Professor of Gastroenterology, II, Medical School, effective May 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*Xiaobing Tang, Helmut F. Stern Professor of Chinese Studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

Yossi Turner, Louis and Helen Padnos Visiting Professor of Judaic Studies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Kon-Well Wang, Stephen P. Timoshenko Collegiate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Yukiko Yamashita, James Playfair McMurrich Collegiate Professor of Life Sciences, Medical School, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Virginia R. Young, Cecil J. and Ethel M. Nesbitt Professor of Actuarial Mathematics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Jianzhi Zhang, Marshall W. Nirenberg Collegiate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

*Bing Zhou, Donald A. Glaser Collegiate Professor of Physics, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

Administrative appointments

Ellen M. Arruda, Tim Manganello/Borg Warner Department Chair of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2023.

Debra Chopp, associate dean for experiential education, Law School, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

*Angela D. Dillard, associate dean for undergraduate education, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019.

Jason R. Dye, chair, Army Officer Education Program, effective June 1, 2018 through May 31, 2021.

Robert Ernst, associate vice president for student life, Student Life, and executive director, University Health Services, Student Life, effective June 1, 2018.

Andreas Gailus, chair, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

*Gottfried J. Hagen, chair, Department of Near Eastern Studies, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2020.

Susan M. Juster, chair, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2020.

*Jody R. Lori, associate dean for global affairs and community engagement, School of Nursing, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

*Knute J. Nadelhoffer, director, Biological Station, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2020.

Ravi Pendse, vice president for information technology and chief information officer, effective Aug. 1, 2018 through July 31, 2023.

Christopher J. Poulsen, associate dean for natural sciences, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2022.

*Andrew J. Shryock, chair, Department of Anthropology, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

**Candace E. Terhune-Flannery, assistant dean for administration and operations, School of Social Work, effective April 1, 2018 through March 31, 2022.

*Jeffrey Veidlinger, director, Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

*Jonathan D. Wells, director, Residential College, LSA, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019.

Tenure changes

M. Anne Pitcher, transfer of tenure to professor of Afroamerican and African studies, with tenure; and professor of political science, with tenure, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018.

Heather A. Thompson, correction of tenure status to professor of Afroamerican and African studies, with tenure; professor of history, with tenure; and professor in the Residential College, without tenure, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017.

David B. Wooten, change of tenure status to professor of marketing, with tenure, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective July 1, 2018.

Dearborn campus

Domenico Grasso, professor of public policy and administration, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters;and professor of sustainable engineering, College of Engineering and Computer Science, effective Sept. 1, 2018.

Georgina Hickey, interim chair, Department of Natural Sciences, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, effective May 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019.

*Michael A. Lachance, associate dean, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

Flint campus

Jennifer E. Alvey, chair, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice, College of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019.

*Scott D. Johnson, dean, School of Management, effective July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

Hisyar Ozsoy, correction to leave end date, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through May 31, 2018.

*Reappointments

**Interim approval granted

Retirements

Hugh D. Aller, Ralph B. Baldwin Professor of Astronomy and professor of astronomy, LSA, May 31, 2018. Aller received Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees and his Ph.D. from U-M in 1964, 1966 and 1968, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1969. Within LSA, Aller served as assistant to the dean for computing from 1989-90 and chair of the Department of Astronomy from 1990-2000. In 1967, he published a seminal paper that reported the discovery of the time variation of the polarized emission from quasi-stellar radio sources. This, together with the discovery of flux density variability by W.A. Dent several years earlier, established the field of active galactic nuclei (AGN) variability studies, in which Aller remained a major contributor for his entire career. He developed automatic computer control for the 26-m radio telescope of the U-M Radio Astronomy Observatory. This dramatically increased the efficiency of observing and allowed for more than 1 million observations of AGN at the centimeter wavelength to be taken during the observatory's lifetime. These data were pivotal in revealing the nature of AGN and their radio band emission: shocked relativistic jets, originating in the supermassive black hole in the nucleus of the AGN parent galaxy.

Paul E. Berry, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and curator of the Herbarium, LSA, May 31, 2018. Berry received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1975 from Haverford College and his Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. in 1979 and 1980 from Washington University, St. Louis. He joined the U-M faculty in 2006. He served as the interim director of the Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum from 2007-08. Berry is recognized internationally as a leader in the study of plant systematics and evolution. He worked worldwide on the evolution and diversification of some of the most difficult groups of plants, with a special interest in the systematics and biogeography of the largest genera of flowering plants. Berry also studied South American plants, and was an editor and prime mover for the multivolume Flora of the Venezuelan Guayana. As director of U-M's Herbarium, he focused on expanding and modernizing the gathering of digital data as well as its distribution to the research community and the public. Berry served on a number of editorial and grant review boards, and was president of the American Society of Plant Taxonomists from 2007-08.

Jerry O. Blackstone, professor of music (conducting), School of Music, Theatre & Dance, May 31, 2018. Blackstone received his Bachelor of Music degree in 1974 from the Wheaton College Conservatory of Music, a Master of Music degree in 1975 from Indiana University, and a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in 1986 from the University of Southern California. He joined the U-M faculty in 1988. Blackstone conducted the university's Chamber Choir and administered a choral program of eleven choirs. He is one of the nation's most recognized and acclaimed choral clinicians, guest conductors, and conducting teachers. In 2006, he received two Grammy Awards, "Best Choral Performance" and "Best Classical Album," as the chorus master for the Naxos recording of William Bolcom's Songs of Innocence and of Experience. He served as coordinator and then chair of the renowned Department of Conducting for more than 25 years. As conductor of the Men's Glee Club, Blackstone led the ensemble on tours throughout the world, and his leadership of the U-M All-State Program at Interlochen and the MI Youth Ensembles Program led to the founding of MPulse Ann Arbor, an extensive summer arts program for high school students. From 2003-15, Blackstone served as the conductor and music director of the University Musical Society Choral Union.

Katarina Tomljenović Borer, professor of kinesiology, School of Kinesiology, May 31, 2018. Borer received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1962 and a Ph.D. in 1966 from the University of Pennsylvania. She joined the U-M faculty in 1977. Borer actively engaged students in her research on exercise endocrinology, and valued guiding students through the process of doing research and learning about regulated biological processes while integrating diverse phenomena to fully comprehend the function. Her research explored the effects of hormones during exercise within the context of biological functions or physiological events. Borer's explanation of hormone action in exercise emphasized the mechanism of action, which is fundamental to developing an advanced understanding of metabolism as well as somatic and physiological adaptation to training. Borer's academic legacy includes an endowed lectureship that funds an annual presentation by a noted scholar in exercise physiology.

Robyn J. Burnham, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences, and associate curator in the Herbarium Museum, LSA, May 31, 2018. Burnham received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1980 from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1983 and 1987, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1991. Burnham's research explored a number of topics, including population biology, biogeography and systematics of dominant neotropical lianas. Her record of publications includes journal articles, book reviews, field guides and contributed meeting papers. Burnham co-edited the comprehensive book "The Ecology of Lianas" in 2015. She served as editor of the journal Paleobiology from 2004-07, and was a member of several professional associations, including the Association for Tropical Biology and the Botanical Society of America. Burnham designed a number of innovative courses on plant diversity and neotropical plants, engaged students in her research and shepherded an informal group that kept plant-oriented undergraduate students abreast of jobs, internships, grants and other opportunities. She received the Excellence in Teaching Award from LSA in 2006.

Kim S. Cameron, William Russell Kelly Professor of Business Administration and professor of organizational behavior and human resource management, Stephen M. Ross School of Business; and professor of education, School of Education, May 31, 2018. Cameron received a Bachelor of Science degree and Master of Science degree in 1970 and 1971, respectively from Brigham Young University. He earned a Master of Arts degree in 1976 and a Ph.D. in 1978 from Yale University. Cameron joined the U-M faculty in 1984 and, after serving in administrative positions at other institutions, returned to the university in 2000. He helped co-found the Center for Positive Organizations at U-M, which in 2012 was awarded the Research Center Impact Award by the Academy of Management. Cameron's past research on organizational virtuousness, downsizing, effectiveness, quality culture and the development of leadership excellence has been published in more than 130 academic articles and 15 scholarly books. He was recognized as being among the top 10 scholars in the organizational sciences whose work has been most frequently downloaded from Google. Cameron served as chair of the Department of Management and Organizations from 1985-89 and associate dean for executive education from 2011-14 in the Ross School.

Mary E. Corcoran, professor of political science and professor of women's studies, LSA; professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy; and research associate professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, May 31, 2018. Corcoran received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Pembroke College in 1968 and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975. She joined the U-M faculty in 1976. Corcoran's scholarly work has been primarily concerned with understanding the sources of population differences in income and occupation. Her approach has been a model of interdisciplinarity, drawing upon and contributing to methods and insights in political science, sociology, social work and women's studies, while holding research appointments in the Survey Research Center and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Corcoran's pioneering work on wage gaps continues to shape the field, some 40 years after her first landmark publication on the subject. Her attention to the ways trajectories and transitions cumulate and organize inequality has become a standard part of the toolkit for understanding inequality. Corcoran led the revival of the public policy and social science doctoral program at the Ford School, and received the Sarah Goddard Power Award in 2004 and the Rackham Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award in 2010.

Alison Cornish, professor of Italian, LSA, May 31, 2018. Cornish received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1984 from the University of California, Berkeley, a Master of Arts degree in 1987 from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. in 1990 from Stanford University. She joined the U-M faculty in 1995. Cornish taught undergraduate courses and graduate seminars in Italian Medieval studies, particularly on Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Ariosto, and Italian through Opera. She published two monographs: "Vernacular Translation in Dante's Italy: Illiterate Literature" (2011) and "Reading Dante's Stars" (2000). She also authored the introduction, notes and headnotes of Stanley Lombardo's 2017 translation of Dante Alighieri's "Paradiso," and co-edited, "Sparks and Seeds: Medieval Italian Literature and Its Afterlife: Essays in Honor of John Freccero." Cornish was a dedicated teacher who promoted a culture of cooperative learning in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. She received the Excellence in Education Award from LSA in 1996.

Madhav M. Deshpande, professor of Sanskrit and professor of linguistics, LSA, May 31, 2018. Deshpande received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Fergusson College in 1966, a Master of Arts degree from the University of Poona in 1968, and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1972. He joined the U-M faculty in 1973. Deshpande has gained international renown for his analyses of Sanskrit grammar, becoming the world's leading expert on the fourth-century BCE grammarian Pāṇini. A prolific scholar, he was the author or editor of 25 books and published 138 scholarly articles in English, with additional scholarly articles in his native Marathi. Deshpande was also an accomplished author in Sanskrit, publishing plays and poems composed in Sanskrit as well as poetry in Marathi. In 1997, he published a textbook titled "Saṃskr̥tasubodhinī: A Sanskrit Primer," which remains widely used for instruction in Sanskrit across the Anglophone world. Deshpande's extensive learning in Sanskrit literature, and in the field of linguistics more broadly, made him an invaluable mentor to generations of graduate students in Sanskrit studies, linguistics, Hindu studies, Indian philosophy and Buddhist studies. He served on 45 dissertation committees at the university over the course of his career.

Paul V. Dunlap, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, LSA, May 31, 2018. Dunlap received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1975 from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. in 1984 from the University of California, Los Angeles. He joined the U-M faculty in 2001. Dunlap's research focused on symbiotic relationships between microbes and marine vertebrates. He was particularly fascinated with the luminescent bacteria that generate light when associated with their flashlight fish host. Research in his laboratory yielded discoveries covering the full spectrum of contemporary biology, from genetics to biochemistry, physiology, ecology and evolution. In the classroom, Dunlap introduced hundreds of students to the spectacular world of microbes. He developed and taught an advanced microbiology course that addressed the metabolic and evolutionary diversity of microbes. He mentored numerous undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students in research projects. Dunlap also served the university as a member of numerous committees, including graduate student admissions committees, faculty search committees, and the Military Officer Education Programs Committee.

Dena Goodman, Lila Miller Collegiate Professor of History and Women's Studies, professor of history, and professor of women's studies, LSA, May 31, 2018. Goodman received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974 from Cornell University, and a Master of Arts degree and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1978 and 1982, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 2000. Goodman is an internationally renowned, award-winning European historian whose scholarship has radically revised the understanding of the French Enlightenment. She ranks at the top of cultural historians of 18th-century France, and she is widely recognized for her interdisciplinary nature and ability to reshape current understanding of important ideas. Goodman held major fellowships from the Mellon Foundation and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2015-16 she was the Dibner Distinguished Fellow in the History of Science and Technology at the Huntington Library. In April 2016, Goodman assumed the presidency of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Her scholarship has been honored with several awards, including the International Society for the Study of European Ideas' Maxwell Prize and the Society for French Historical Studies' William Koren, Jr. Prize. Goodman is the originator and co-director of a collaborative project for publishing digital translations into English of 18th-century texts.

Samuel R. Gross, Thomas G. and Mabel Long Professor of Law and professor of law, Law School, May 31, 2018. Gross received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Columbia College in 1968, and his law degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1973. He joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Gross is a leading scholar of evidence law, the death penalty, false convictions, racial profiling, eyewitness identification and the relationship between pretrial bargaining and trial verdicts. As a cooperating attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund in New York and the National Jury Project in California, he litigated a series of test cases on jury selection in capital trials and worked on the issue of racial discrimination in the application of the death penalty. Gross co-authored "Death and Discrimination: Racial Disparities in Capital Sentencing," as well as the leading casebook "A Modern Approach to Evidence: Texts, Problems, Transcripts, and Cases." Gross earned national recognition for his work as a senior editor and co-founder of the National Registry of Exonerations, a detailed online database of all known exonerations in the United States since 1989. Along with several reports written for the National Registry of Exonerations, Gross co-authored a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that estimated the percentage of defendants sentenced to death in the United States since 1973 to be more than 4 percent.

Berit Ingersoll-Dayton, professor of social work, School of Social Work, May 31, 2018. Ingersoll-Dayton received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from Oberlin College, and her Master of Social Work, Master of Arts and Ph.D. from U-M in 1977, 1981 and 1982, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1992, and served as the director of the Joint Doctoral Program in Social Work and Social Science from 2010-16. Ingersoll-Dayton is the author of more than 70 journal articles and book chapters as well as two books. She was the principal investigator and co-principal investigator on research and training grants funded by the National Institute on Aging, the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, and the Michigan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, among others. Her accomplishments in research, scholarship, and service have earned her such recognition as being selected as a Hartford Geriatric Social Work National Research Mentor and being elected a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America. Ingersoll-Dayton's research focused on social support and clinical research with respect to families in later life. She has provided extensive mentorship to a generation of faculty, post-doctoral trainees, and graduate students.

Ronald F. Inglehart, Amy and Alan Lowenstein Professor of Democracy, Democratization, and Human Rights and professor of political science, LSA, May 31, 2018. Inglehart received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Northwestern University in 1956, and a Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1962 and 1967, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1967. Inglehart is a leader in the fields of comparative government and politics, political development and political psychology. He created the study of postmaterialism, which, as he describes it, is a "value orientation that emphasizes self-expression and quality of life over economic and physical security." Inglehart helped found the Euro-Barometer surveys and has served as the long-term director of the World Values Survey. He was also the co-director of the Laboratory for Comparative Social Research at the Higher School of Economics in St. Petersburg, Russia. Inglehart was a visiting professor or visiting scholar in Brazil, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, South Korea, Switzerland and Taiwan, and served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of State and the European Union. He is a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

Nancy K. Janz, professor of health behavior and health education, School of Public Health, May 31, 2018. Janz received a Bachelor of Science degree, a Master of Science degree and a Ph.D. from U-M in 1969, 1972 and 1986, respectively. She joined the faculty in 1991, and held several roles throughout her career, including interim co-chair and associate chair of the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, associate director of the Center for Managing Chronic Disease, and associate dean for academic affairs in SPH. Janz is a nationally recognized leader in the examination of psychosocial factors that influence preventive health behaviors, including screenings in breast and colorectal cancer. She has written extensively about the use of behavioral theory in understanding adherence to cancer screenings. A major area of her scholarly work has involved the impact of chronic disease and its treatment on health-related quality of life. Janz authored and co-authored more than 150 papers. She is a founding member of the Cancer Surveillance and Outcomes Research Team, where her role in several projects has been to better understand the information and support needs of women with breast cancer as well as the impact racial and ethnic differences have on breast cancer, its treatment and quality of life over time. She was a mentor and teacher to a generation of public health students.

Vassilios Lambropoulos, C. P. Cavafy Professor of Modern Greek Studies, professor of Modern Greek studies, and professor of comparative literature, LSA, May 31, 2018. Lambropoulos received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Athens in 1975 and a Ph.D. from the University of Thessaloniki in 1980. He joined the U-M faculty in 1999. Lambropoulos brought national and international recognition to Modern Greek studies with his teaching, research and leadership. He was the director of the Modern Greek Program from 1999-2018, building the curriculum to offer an undergraduate minor and major as well as graduate studies. His research in the fields of comparative literature and classical receptions covered diverse areas from Modern Greek literature to pre-Socratic philosophy, political theory, pop and classical music and ethics. Lambropoulos published three books, two co-edited books, two special issues of journals and the complete works of modernist author Melpo Axioti. Lambropoulos received a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Teachers in 1992 and a LSA/OVPR Michigan Humanities Award in 2005, and was an Alexander S. Onassis Visiting Professor at three American universities in 2007. He served as a vice president of the Modern Greek Studies Association's executive board and as the humanities editor of its Journal of Modern Greek Studies.

Karen Markey, professor of information, School of Information, May 31, 2018. Markey received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1975 from The Johns Hopkins University, and a Master of Library and Information Science degree and Ph.D. from Syracuse University in 1977 and 1981, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Markey devoted her research, teaching and service to improving user access to online search systems. Her research helped shape the design and development of online catalogs, the first search systems available to everyday people. In the mid-1980s, Markey's Dewey Decimal Classification Online Project was the first to incorporate a library classification as a library user's tool in a search system. Her research on authority control was a precursor to today's do-you-mean prompts that divert users from their misspelled and incorrect keywords to corrected ones. As the principal investigator of the IMLS-sponsored BiblioBouts Project, Markey led a team that designed, developed, and evaluated an online social game that covertly taught undergraduate students how to conduct library research while they complete their assigned papers. This work led to a Provost's Innovative Teaching Prize and a book titled "Designing Online Information Literacy Games Students Want to Play." Professor Markey also authored two editions of a major textbook for teaching aspiring librarians how to master the current information-rich environment.

Mary Ellen McLean, clinical associate professor of dentistry, School of Dentistry, April 30, 2018. McLean received a Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Creighton University in 1985. She joined the U-M faculty in 1997. McLean has been a mainstay as an instructor in the Vertically Integrated Clinics where she supervised predoctoral dental students as they provided patient care. She was the director of Clinical Foundations I, a lecture and preclinical laboratory course focused on the development of basic diagnostic and restorative skills, from 2000-14. McLean also served as a course director or row instructor of numerous other lecture courses, seminars and preclinical courses. She was inducted as a faculty member into the Omicron Kappa Upsilon National Dental Honor Society in 2004 and received the D1 Instructor of the Year Award in 2009. McLean published seven peer-reviewed articles and 16 research abstracts, and was a member of numerous task forces and dental school committees, including the Admissions Committee, the Bylaws Committee, and the Executive Committee. She also served on the UM-Ann Arbor Military Officer Education Program Committee from 2004-08. She was a member of the American Dental Association, the Michigan Dental Association, and the American Dental Education Association. McLean served in the Air Force Reserves until her retirement at the rank of colonel in 2011.

David J. Moore, associate professor of kinesiology, School of Kinesiology, May 31, 2018. Moore received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of the West Indies St. Augustine, Trinidad, in 1970, a Master of Business Administration degree from Middle Tennessee State University in 1975, and a Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1984. He joined the U-M faculty in 1988. Moore's research focused on consumer behavior and the psychological processes behind consumers' decision making within the marketing domain. His work made significant contributions to the field of sport consumer behavior. Moore served as an editorial board member of the Journal of Advertising and the Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice. His undergraduate courses explored a number of topics, including marketing management, brand strategy and advertising campaigns, sales force management, professional selling strategy, consumer behavior, marketing research, sport marketing and international marketing. Moore was a member of the American Marketing Association, the Association for Consumer Research, the Society for Consumer Psychology, and the Sport Marketing Association. He received the Best Reviewer Award from the Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice in 2014.

Homer A. Neal, interim president emeritus, vice president emeritus for research, Samuel A. Goudsmit Distinguished University Professor of Physics, and professor of physics, LSA, May 31, 2018. Neal received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1961 from Indiana University, and a Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from U-M in 1963 and 1966, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1987. He served as the vice president for research from 1993-97, interim president from 1996-97, and director of the UM ATLAS Collaboratory Project from 1997-2016. Neal is a world-leading expert in the studies of particle spins and polarizations. He pursued his research at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, the Fermilab and the Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire (CERN). He had important roles in the discoveries of the two fundamental particles in the last quarter century: the top quark in 1995 at the Fermilab and the Higgs boson in 2012 at CERN. After the U.S. Congress canceled the super collider, Neal led a group of faculty to join the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The group made critical contributions to the discovery of the Higgs boson. While serving on the National Science Board, Neal played a pivotal role in the establishment of the National Science Foundation's Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

Anita Norich, Tikva Frymer-Kensky Collegiate Professor of English and Judaic Studies, professor of English language and literature, and professor of Judaic studies, LSA, May 31, 2018. Norich received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1973 from Barnard College, and a Master of Arts degree, Master of Philosophy degree and Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1974, 1976 and 1979, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1983. Norich began her career as a specialist in British Victorian literature, before becoming one of the world's indispensable experts on modern Yiddish literature. The author of dozens of articles and book reviews, she has also published three books. Her forthcoming volume is an introduction to and translation of Kadya Molodovsky's "From Lublin to New York: Rivke Zilberg's Journal." Her recent archival discovery of two previously unknown novels by Molodovsky promises to overturn standard views in the field — that American women Yiddish writers composed poetry but not novels, and that fiction of the Holocaust was not written until after the Holocaust. The recipient of multiple fellowships, Norich has been a member of many editorial boards; worked as a scholarly reviewer of manuscripts and applications for leading journals, presses, and foundations; served on external committees evaluating programs at peer universities; and was a frequent invited lecturer. At U-M, she served as the executive director of the Frankel Institute for Judaic Studies.

G. Peter Scott, professor of mathematics, LSA, May 31, 2018. Scott received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1965 from Oxford University, and a Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of Warwick in 1966 and 1969, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Scott studied geometric group theory as well as low-dimensional geometry and topology. In geometry and topology, he is best known for his fundamental research on three-dimensional manifolds, but his work also encompassed important contributions to the theory of Kleinian groups, differential geometry, and the study of minimal surfaces. In geometric group theory, he pioneered the study of subgroup separability and explored canonical splittings of groups. Scott published 60 research papers with several co-authors, and supervised 21 Ph.D. students. He served for a total of 11 years on three separate occasions as chair of the Doctoral Committee. This position supervised and monitored the academic progress of approximately 100 mathematics doctoral students. He was also director of graduate admissions for a year. Scott has served on several other departmental committees, including terms on the Executive Committee, the Long Range Planning Committee, and the Personnel Committee. He was awarded the Berwick Prize by the London Mathematical Society in 1986, and named a fellow of the American Mathematical Society in 2012.

George J. Siedel, III, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Williamson Family Professor of Business Administration, and professor of business law, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, May 31, 2018. Siedel received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of Wooster in 1967, his law degree from U-M in 1970, and his Diploma in Comparative Legal Studies from Cambridge University in 1971. He joined the U-M faculty in 1974, and served as associate dean of the Ross School from 1993-98. Siedel is best known for his research on proactive law, including his books "Proactive Law for Managers: A Hidden Source of Competitive Advantage" and "Using the Law for Competitive Advantage." Siedel's research awards include the Hoeber Award, the Bunche Award and the Maurer Award from the Academy of Legal Studies in Business. Siedel was the founding director of the Washington Campus Undergraduate Studies Program, which enables hundreds of U-M students to study public policy in Washington, D.C. From 1988-93, he also served as the national director of the Minority Summer Institute, a program designed to encourage minority students to enroll in business school doctoral programs. Siedel received a number of teaching awards, including the Professor of the Year from the Consortium of Universities for International Studies in 2014.

Michael Sivak, Distinguished Research Scientist and research professor at the University of Michigan Transporta­tion Research Institute, April 5, 2018. Sivak received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1972 from the City University of New York, and a Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from U-M in 1975 and 1976, respectively. He joined U-M as a senior research associate in 1977. In 2001, he received the Distinguished Research Scientist Award and title from the U-M Office of Research. In the first phase of his research, Sivak focused on visibility and lighting in road transportation. His investigations in human visual capabilities and limitations contributed to a better understanding of how to improve vehicle headlamps, signals and rearview mirrors. In the second phase of his research, he was concerned with the safety and sustainability of road transportation. This led Sivak to examine the benefits and limitations of autonomous and electric vehicles relative to conventional vehicles, and to consider which types consumers prefer. For the past 10 years, Sivak directed highly cited monthly monitoring of the fuel economy of vehicles sold in the United States. He was also the co-inventor on two patents. Sivak was honored with the Leon Gaster Award from the Society of Light and Lighting and the A.R. Lauer Safety Award from the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

Peter Sparling, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Rudolf Arnheim Distinguished University Professor of Dance, and professor of dance, School of Music, Theatre & Dance, May 31, 2018. Sparling received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Julliard School in 1973, and was a member of the José Limón Dance Company and the principal dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company. He had extensive experience as the artistic director of the Peter Sparling Dance Company in New York City as well as in Ann Arbor, and joined the U-M faculty in 1984. Sparling had extensive experience as an artistic director, choreographer, performer, lecturer, video artist, writer, dance/arts consultant and teacher. His videodance "Babel" was selected for the 2007 New York Dance on Camera Festival, the 2008 American Dance Festival Dance Film & Video Festival, and has toured the world. His made-for-TV work "Climbing Sainte-Victoire" was broadcast on Michigan Television in April 2009, and his screendance "The Snowy Owl" was featured at the Short Film Corner of the 2015 Cannes Film Festival. Sparling presented at the Society of Dance History Scholars and the Southeastern College Art Conference, and co-chaired "Meanings and Makings of Queer Dance" at U-M in 2012.

Douglas E. Van Houweling, professor of information, School of Information, May 31, 2018. Van Houweling received a Bachelor of Science degree from Iowa State University in 1965 and a Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1974. He joined the U-M faculty as the vice provost for information technology from 1984-95, and an adjunct professor from 1985-95. He was appointed a professor of information in 1996. He also served as the School of Information's associate dean for research and innovation from 2010-14. Van Houweling was serving as chief information officer at U-M and chairman of the board of the Michigan Educational Research Information Triad (MERIT) when the National Science Foundation awarded MERIT the responsibility for the operation and management of the NSFnet national backbone — the foundation upon which the global internet was built. During MERIT's seven-year tenure, internet traffic and connectivity grew by more than 400 percent per year. When the NSFnet project began transitioning the internet backbone to commercial providers in 1992, more than 6,000 networks were connected, including one third of which were outside the United States. Van Houweling was also chairman of the Board of Advanced Network and Services Corp. From 1997-2010, he served as the president and chief executive officer of Internet2, the national research and education network for the United States.