University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

December 12, 2017

Regents Roundup — December 2017

December 7, 2017

Regents Roundup — December 2017

Topic: Regents

The following items were approved by the Board of Regents at its meeting Thursday.

Infrastructure improvements for East Ann Arbor Health and Geriatrics Center

The Board of Regents approved a $3.5 million project that will replace mechanical systems that need updating at the East Ann Arbor Health and Geriatrics Center, including heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The project will improve energy efficiency, reliability, occupant comfort and safety. The project will be funded from health system resources and is scheduled to be completed in the winter of 2019.

Storm water improvements planned for Central Campus

To reduce flooding in nearby buildings due to lack of capacity in the city storm water system that flows to the Allen Creek drain, an underground storm water infiltration system will be constructed east of South State Street near Angell Hall and Alumni Memorial Hall. The $4.5 million project will be funded from Utilities resources and investment proceeds and is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2018.

UM-Flint adds occupational therapy department

The UM-Flint School of Health Professions and Studies established a new Occupational Therapy Department effective Jan. 1, 2018. The university will launch an Occupational Therapy Doctorate program in fall 2019, the first in the state of Michigan. The program will enroll 40 students per cohort in the three-year, 110-credit hour program, requiring a total of 8.5 full-time equivalent faculty. This will be achieved by hiring eight full-time faculty and one full-time department/program director (0.5 faculty/0.5 administrative). SHPS plans to add additional programs in occupational therapy once the OTD program is situated.

Close proximity fireworks display at UM-Flint approved

A close proximity fireworks display as part of the city of Flint's New Year's Eve celebration was approved for the city of Flint Downtown Development Authority. The Dec. 31 fireworks display will be performed from the rooftop of the UM-Flint Harrison parking ramp. There are no adjoining buildings in relation to the parking ramp that is constructed of cement and structural steel. The ramp will be vacant during the fireworks display and access will remain restricted until the company selected to produce the fireworks show, Wolverine Fireworks Display Inc., vacates the premises.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure

K. Rivet Amico, associate professor of nursing, School of Nursing, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Jacob M. Haus, associate professor of kinesiology, School of Kinesiology, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Todd I. Herrenkohl, professor of social work, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Mehboob Hussain, professor of internal medicine, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Hernán López-Fernández, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Arvind U.K. Rao, associate professor of computational medicine and bioinformatics, Medical School, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Named professorships

*Robert F. Beck, Richard B. Couch Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through June 30, 2018.

Carmen Bugan, Helen L. DeRoy Visiting Professor in Honors, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2018 through May 31, 2019.

Linda M. Chatters, Paula Allen-Meares Collegiate Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work, effective Nov. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*James F. Driscoll, Arthur B. Modine Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Nicole Ellison, Karl E. Weick Collegiate Professor of Information, School of Information, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2022.

Barbara T. Felt, David G. Dickinson Collegiate Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

**Allen D. Hicken, Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies, LSA, effective Sept. 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018.

Joseph A. Himle, Howard V. Brabson Collegiate Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

A. Van Jordan, Robert Hayden Collegiate Professor of English Language and Literature, LSA, effective Dec. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2022.

*Sridhar Kota, Herrick Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

*John E. Laird, John L. Tishman Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

*Theodore B. Norris, Gérard A. Mourou Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

*Lutgarde M. Raskin, Altarum/ERIM Russell D. O'Neal Professor of Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Kathleen A. Stringer, Albert B. Prescott Professor of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2022.

Eliza Pei-Suen Tsou, Edward T. and Ellen K. Dryer Early Career Professor of Rheumatology, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2017 through Nov. 30, 2022.

Jenna Wiens, Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2019.

Administrative appointments

Nancy Bartlett, acting director, Bentley Historical Library, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through May 31, 2018.

*Mark S. Daskin, chair, Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Aug. 31, 2018.

Dana Dolinoy Cipolla, NSF International Department Chair of Environmental Health Sciences, and chair, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, effective Dec. 1, 2017 through Nov. 30, 2020.

Ronald M. Gilgenbach, Glenn F. and Gladys H. Knoll Department Chair of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, College of Engineering, effective Nov. 1, 2017 through May 31, 2020.

Joseph A. Himle, associate dean for faculty affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2020.

**Kambiz Khalili, associate vice president for student life, Student Life, effective Dec. 4, 2017.

Maria Carmen de Mello Lemos, associate dean for research and engagement, School for Environment and Sustainability, effective Dec. 1, 2017 through Aug. 31, 2019.

*Timothy G. Lynch, vice president and general counsel, Office of the Vice President and General Counsel, effective Jan. 7, 2018.

Mark S. Mizruchi, correction of a reappointment as director, Organizational Studies Program, and Barger Family Professor of Organizational Studies, LSA, effective July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2020.

Rogério M. Pinto, associate dean for research, School of Social Work, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2020.

Andrew L. Rosenberg, interim vice president for information technology and chief information officer, Office of the President, effective Dec. 7, 2017.

Kelly B. Sexton, associate vice president for research — technology transfer and innovation partnerships, U-M Office of Research, effective Jan. 16, 2018.

Simone Himbeault Taylor, change in title to senior associate vice president for student life, Student Life, effective Dec. 8, 2017.

Dearborn campus

Ulrich Kamp, professor of geology, Department of Natural Sciences, College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

*Ilir Miteza, associate provost for graduate, international, and online learning, Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2020.

*Lee S. Redding, chair, Department of Accounting and Finance, College of Business, effective Jan. 1, 2018 through June 30, 2021.

Flint campus

Mary Jo Sekelsky, interim vice chancellor for university advancement, Office of the Chancellor, effective Dec. 7, 2017.

*Reappointments

**Interim approval granted

Retirements

Pamela I. Brown, clinical associate professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2017. Brown received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1973 from Cornell University, a Master of Science degree in 1975 and Ph.D. in 1978 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and her medical degree in 1983 from Case Western Reserve University. She joined the U-M faculty in 1998. Brown's career focused on the clinical care of complex patients and medical education. She helped develop the Children's Intestinal Rehabilitation Program, which became one of the earliest collaborative multi-disciplinary team efforts between pediatric gastroenterology and pediatric surgery. She held a number of key leadership positions, including director of clinical operations in the Pediatric Gastroenterology Division and medical director of the Children's Intestinal Rehabilitation Program. Brown was a reviewer and contributor on the Institutional Review Boards of the Medical School. She also was actively involved in the Medical School's Clinical Track Appointments and Promotions Committee and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

Paul L. Carson, professor of radiology in the Medical School and professor of biomedical engineering in the College of Engineering, Dec. 30, 2017. Carson received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1965 from Colorado College and a Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in 1969 and 1971, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1981. A founding director of the Division of Basic Radiological Sciences, Carson recruited faculty and stimulated scientific research in medical imaging. His personal research focused on the development of diagnostic ultrasound contrast media and the potential therapeutic benefits of encapsulating chemotherapeutic agents within microbubbles. Carson authored 193 peer-reviewed publications and served on the board of directors of a number of national societies, including the Academy of Radiology Research and the American Institute of Physics. He also served as president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and received several awards, including the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine's Joseph H. Holmes Basic Science Pioneer Award. The Paul L. Carson, Ph.D. Collegiate Professorship in Radiology was created in recognition of his extensive contributions to U-M and the Department of Radiology.

Ronald M. Cresswell, professor of medicinal chemistry in the College of Pharmacy, Dec. 31, 2017. Cresswell received a Bachelor of Science degree and Ph.D. from the University of Glasgow in 1953 and 1960, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1991. Cresswell's career began in 1962 as a senior biochemist at the international pharmaceutical firm Burroughs Wellcome Co. His career there culminated in his responsibility for the company's worldwide research staff. He served as chief operating officer for a short time at Laporte Industries, Ltd., London, before joining the Worldwide Pharmaceutical Research and Development Division of the Warner-Lambert Company. The following year he was named chairman of the division, which became known as Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research, and in 1998 he was named senior vice president and chief scientific officer of the Warner-Lambert Company. Cresswell has been actively involved in the medicinal chemistry program in the College of Pharmacy, and holds more than 20 U.S. patents and many foreign equivalents. He received an honorary degree from the University of Strathclyde in 1997.

Martha Mitchell Funnell, research scientist, learning health sciences, Medical School, Jan. 3, 2018. Funnell received a Bachelor of Science degree from Lenoir Rhyne University in 1971 and a Master of Science degree from U-M in 1975. She joined the university's faculty in 1982. In 1983, she accepted a position in the U-M Diabetes Research and Training Center and she joined the Medical School's Department of Learning Health Sciences in 2006, where she held a number of appointments, including research investigator and research scientist. Funnell is best known for her research in patient empowerment. She has also been a leader in developing and implementing evidence-based standards for diabetes patient education. Funnell has served as co- or principal investigator for 12 funded educational and behavioral research projects, has given over 220 invited presentations and authored 150 peer-reviewed publications, 35 book chapters and seven books. Funnell served as the president of the American Diabetes Association, Health Care & Education and as the first nurse (and non-physician) to chair the National Diabetes Education Program. She has been recognized for her work with the Distinguished Service Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Association of Diabetes Educators.

Ari Gafni, professor of biophysics, LSA; professor of biological chemistry and research professor, Institute of Gerontology, Medical School, Jan. 2, 2018. Gafni received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1964 and a Master of Science degree in 1966 from Hebrew University. He received his Ph.D. in 1973 from the Weizmann Institute of Science, and he joined the U-M faculty in 1983. Gafni's research focused on protein folding diseases and understanding how to quantitatively explore the role of protein misfolding in human disease. Gafni's efforts led to important insights into the integrity of a protein's folded state throughout aging and in the context of specific diseases, such as Alzheimer's related diseases, and to the identification and characterization of cytotoxic protein states that influence human disease states. He played a pivotal role in the development of the biophysics undergraduate curriculum. Gafni was actively involved in a number of professional associations, including the Biophysical Society and the Gerontological Society of America. Gafni was named an American Heart Association Senior Investigator, elected a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and inducted in The Johns Hopkins University's Society of Scholars.

Zvi Gitelman, Preston R. Tisch Professor of Judaic Studies, professor of Judaic studies, and professor of political science, LSA, Dec. 31, 2017. Gitelman received a Bachelor of Hebrew Literature in 1962 from the Jewish Theological Seminary, a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1962 from Columbia College, and a Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1965 and 1968, respectively. Gitelman joined the U-M faculty in 1968. He played an integral role in the establishment of the Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies, and served as director of the center from 1995 to 2002. Gitelman studied ethnicity and politics, especially in former Communist countries, as well as Israeli politics, East European politics, and Jewish political thought and behavior. He is a co-editor of a forthcoming volume on Jewish thought, politics and literatures in the interwar period. Gitelman has authored books on Soviet Jewish life and politics, several of which were written before Soviet archives were available and during a period in which American scholarship was highly politicized by Cold War battles. He has also written several nuanced studies of the complexities of Jewish life in the Soviet Union and its successor states, including the 2012 "Jewish Identities in Postcommunist Russia and Ukraine: An Uncertain Ethnicity."

John W. Halloran, professor of materials science and engineering, College of Engineering, Dec. 31, 2017. Halloran received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri-Rolla and his Ph.D. in 1977 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the U-M faculty in 1990. Halloran's research focused on ceramic materials, with a special emphasis on their properties and manufacturing, including 3-D printing. He published more than 250 papers and patents, and participated in the commercialization of four university patents and innovations. Halloran was the editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society and a member of the World Academy of Ceramics. He served as chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering from 2000-05. Halloran advised 28 Ph.D. students. He was named the Alfred Holmes White Collegiate Professor from 2000-12 and the L.H. and F.E. Van Vlack Professor of Materials Science and Engineering from 2012-17. In 2011, he received the Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Award for Teaching Excellence.

Jean P. Krisch, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and professor of physics, LSA, Dec. 31, 2017. Krisch received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1960 from the University of Maryland and Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1962 and 1965, respectively. She joined the U-M faculty in 1974. Krisch's research focused on general relativity and some of its extensions. Working with collaborators in the United States, Canada, and Turkey, she explored the behavior of complex fluids in exact solutions to the Einstein field equations and the methods of adding rotation to static matter distributions. Krisch received two honorable mentions in the Babson Gravity Essay Contest for the essays, served as the undergraduate associate chair and has been a physics academic counselor for many years. She helped organize the first U-M Physics Summer Undergraduate Research Experience program at the European Organization for Nuclear Research in 1991. Krisch served as president of the National Society of Physics Students Council and as the national president of Sigma Pi Sigma Physics Honor Society. She has received numerous awards for her teaching and service, including the Amoco Good Teaching Award and the Sarah Goddard Power Award.

Robert W. Lash, chief of staff for clinical affairs, Michigan Medicine, and clinical professor of internal medicine, Medical School, Dec. 29, 2017. Lash received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1980 from Dartmouth College and medical degree in 1984 from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He joined the U-M faculty in 1996. Lash is a leader in the field of endocrine diseases. He was an active member of the Michigan Medicine guideline groups on these diseases and authored a number of book chapters and review articles on pituitary disease, bone disorders, and gestational diabetes. Lash edited the endocrine sections of two internal medicine handbooks and collaborated on published research projects on gestational diabetes and bone metabolism. He was involved in a number of committees, including as chair of the Executive Committee for Clinical Affairs and chair of the Medical Staff Quality Committee. Lash received numerous Medical School teaching awards, including the Senior Award and the Richard D. Judge Award for Excellence in Medical Student Teaching. He was inducted into the Medical School's League of Educational Excellence in 2012 and the Academy of Medical Educators in 2013.

James A. Leonard, clinical professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the Medical School, Dec. 31, 2017. Leonard received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1968 from the University of Detroit and a medical degree in 1972 from U-M. He joined the U-M faculty in 1975 and served as chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation from 1996 to 2006. Leonard is a leader in the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation, with special expertise in the care and treatment of amputee patients and those requiring prosthetics and orthotics. He has an extensive record of teaching medical students, residents and fellows as well as presenting at numerous conferences and seminars. Leonard was actively involved in a number of national organizations, including the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine and the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine. He received numerous awards, including the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation's Distinguished Clinician Award and three Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation's Silver Crutch Awards for excellence in resident teaching.

Alan M. Mellow, associate professor of psychiatry in the Medical School, Jan. 2, 2018. Mellow received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1973 from the University of Illinois, Chicago and Urbana. He received Ph.D. and medical degrees from Northwestern University in 1980 and 1981, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1988 and also held a joint appointment as a staff psychiatrist at the VA Ann Arbor Health System. Mellow's research focused on the pharmacology of dementia, the psychobiology and pharmacotherapy of geriatric alcoholism, outcomes in dementia and geriatric depression and pain-suicide relationships. He served on grant review committees for the VA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute on Aging. Mellow served as the founding chief of the university's Section of Geriatric Psychiatry from 1995 to 2009 and founding director of the university's Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship Program from 1990 to 2008. Mellow worked with multiple mentees over the years, and he published over 60 peer-reviewed publications and presented at over 70 conferences. Mellow has been listed as one of America's Top Doctors since 2001 and was cited as being in the top one percent of U.S. geriatric psychiatrists according to U.S. News & World Report in 2012.

Julia E. Richards, Harold F. Falls Collegiate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences, Medical School, and professor of epidemiology, School of Public Health, Oct. 31, 2017. Richards received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1971 from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in 1983 from the University of Wisconsin. She joined the U-M faculty in 1989, and was named the Harold F. Falls Collegiate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences in 2009. Richards is internationally recognized for her research in ophthalmic genetics. Her earliest work included the cloning of some of the first single copy mammalian genes in the early days of molecular biology. The main body of her work led to the identification of many genetic risk factors, genes and pathways involved in human eye diseases. Richards helped published two editions of "The Human Genome: A User's Guide," and authored more than 100 research articles, 20 book chapters, and 120 meeting abstracts. Richards' proposal, "Fountains of Youth for the Eye," was the winning entry for the National Eye Institute's Audacious Goals Challenge in 2013, and she was inducted into the Medical School's League of Research Excellence in 2011.

Robert Savit, professor of physics, LSA, Dec. 31, 2017. Savit received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969 from the University of Chicago and a Master of Science degree and Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1970 and 1973, respectively. He joined U-M as an assistant research scientist in 1978. Savit was trained as a high energy theorist at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. He has done seminal work not only in high energy physics but also in statistical mechanics, nonlinear dynamics and complex systems, and has applied these ideas to important problems in the biological and social sciences, including work on the theory of evolution and game theory. Savit has served as a consultant to several financial institutions, contract research organizations, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the government of Argentina. He was the founding director of the Program for the Study of Complex Systems and served as the associate chair for the undergraduate program in the Department of Physics. Savit received the Excellence in Education Award from LSA in 1991.

Donald Scavia, professor of environment and sustainability in the School for Environment and Sustainability, Dec. 31, 2017. Scavia received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1973 and a Master of Science degree in 1974 from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He earned his Ph.D. in 1980 from U-M and joined the university faculty in 2004. Scavia studied the effects of natural and anthropogenic stresses on Great Lakes and marine ecosystems. His work explored how models and integrated assessments can be used to transfer knowledge to the decision-making process. Scavia's research supported the development and application of integrated assessment, a tool that brings together natural science, social science, engineering and environmental policy making. His work led to the development of methods for predicting and managing the size of dead zones in the Great Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico as well as toxic algae in Lake Erie. Scavia published over 200 papers in refereed journals, edited two books, and contributed chapters to 28 others. At U-M, he mentored and advised several students and postdoctoral fellows, and chaired or served on 11 doctoral committees. Scavia held a number of leadership roles at the former School of Natural Resources and Environment, including director of the Michigan Sea Grant and associate dean for research. He also served as the director of the Graham Sustainability Institute, the Graham Family Professor, and the special counsel to the president for sustainability from 2009-16.

James M. Scheiman, professor of internal medicine in the Medical School, Sept. 16, 2017. Scheiman received a Bachelor of Science degree and medical degree from U-M in 1980 and 1982, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1987. Scheiman's clinical and research interests are in the areas of endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and analyses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug related gastrointestinal injury and prevention. He published more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, provided peer-review service for a number of journals and served on the editorial board for the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. Scheiman served as the director of the Advanced Endoscopy Training Program for 10 years, and mentored numerous fellows and junior faculty on their research projects. Scheiman served on a number of committees, including the U-M Senate Assembly, has been active in the American Gastroenterological Association and the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, and served as the American College of Gastroenterology Governor for Michigan.

Frank P. Stafford, professor of economics, LSA, and research professor in the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, Dec. 31, 2017. Stafford received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1962 from Northwestern University and his Master of Business Administration degree and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1964 and 1968, respectively. He joined the U-M faculty in 1969, and served as chair of the Department of Economics from 1980-83. He directed the Panel Study of Income Dynamics at the Survey Research Center in the Institute for Social Research from 1994 to 2009. Stafford's most influential work focused on how households allocate time and financial resources, both the factors that influence these decisions and their consequences. These studies often dealt with allocation of time within the household, including decisions about time devoted to leisure, child care and household work, and how these decisions responded to increases in market work by married women. He was instrumental in the design of complex panels and is a world-renowned expert on their analysis. In 2010, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics was listed as one of the 60 most influential projects in any field funded by the National Science Foundation in its history.

Tetsufumi Ueda, professor of pharmacology and research professor in the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, Medical School, Sept. 30, 2016. Ueda received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1966 from Kyoto University and a Ph.D. in 1971 from U-M. He joined the university faculty in 1978. Ueda made fundamental contributions in the areas of neuroscience and synaptic terminal biochemistry. During his postdoctoral fellowship and research associate appointment with Paul Greengard at Yale University, he identified and purified a major phosphorylated synaptic terminal protein known as synapsin. This discovery and the elucidation of its function in synaptic transmission were important developments in the understanding of specific protein function in the central nervous system. Ueda returned to U-M and continued protein phosphorylation studies in the central nervous system. His focus shifted when he discovered and elucidated the chemiosmotic mechanism underlying glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles. Next, he provided evidence for the coupling of local carbohydrate metabolism associated with the synaptic vesicle membrane to the production of adenosine triphosphate. More recently, Ueda has used his expertise concerning glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles to start a program to discover small molecule inhibitors of synaptic vesicle glutamate uptake.

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