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News for Faculty and Staff

October 25, 2014

Regents Roundup — December 2013

December 19, 2013

Regents Roundup — December 2013

The following items were approved by the Board of Regents at its meeting Thursday:

Design for Nuclear Engineering Laboratory renovation approved

The schematic design for the renovation of the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory on North Campus was approved. The project will increase usable floor space within the building, increasing the total square footage to 20,500 gross square feet.

The renovation will help accommodate the expansion needs of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences in the College of Engineering. It will create new space for flexible research laboratories, testing areas, offices and support spaces.

CoE is funding the $11.4 million renovation. It is scheduled for completion in fall 2015.

Final approval for research museum collection relocation project

The Varsity Drive Building Dry Collections Relocation Renovations project will renovate approximately 71,000 gross square feet of the Varsity Drive Building to accommodate relocating research museum collections, associated lab spaces, and some offices for the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Museums of Anthropology and Paleontology.

Environmentally-controlled areas will be created within the Varsity Drive Building to accommodate the relocation from the Alexander G. Ruthven Museums Building, the Campus Safety Services Building, and the Clarence Cook Little Science Building.

The $27.45 million project is being funded by LSA. It is scheduled for completion in winter 2015.

Moore Building renovation and expansion moves forward

Final approval was received for the Earl V. Moore Building Renovation and Brehm Pavilion project for the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. The renovation of approximately 28,000 gross square feet will relocate offices in order to increase the number, size and quality of music practice rooms.

The 34,000-gross-square-foot Brehm Pavilion addition will include three classrooms, a large lecture hall, jazz and percussion suite, labs for class piano, a large rehearsal hall, new building lobby and support spaces, and will include shelled space for future use. In addition the project will update the existing Moore Building fire detection and alarm system to be integrated with the system in the Brehm Pavilion.

Investment proceeds and gifts are funding the $24.32 million project scheduled for completion in fall 2015.

Life safety improvements planned for graduate library

The Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library Life Safety Upgrades project will upgrade the library’s 40-year-old fire detection and alarm system to meet current codes and standards, including those set by the Americans with Disabilities Act, and upgrade the emergency lighting system to improve the safety of building occupants and property.

The $3 million project, funded from university investment proceeds, is scheduled for completion next fall.

Cook Legal Research Library roofing to be replaced

Failing roofing on the ninth floor of the William W. Cook Legal Research Library will be replaced, with insulation and fireproofing added to the attic space below the roof deck to eliminate ice dams and roof leaks.

General fund resources will pay for the $1.7 million project that is scheduled to be completed next fall.

New UM-Dearborn department created

The establishment of a new department within the UM-Dearborn College of Education, Health and Human Services was approved. The Department of Health and Human Services combines the two previously approved department names of Department of Community and Public Health and the Department of Social Work.

UM-Dearborn’s School of Education officially became the College of Education, Health and Human Services Sept. 1, 2013. This change was made to allow the college to create new programs to help meet the demand of non-clinical health professions.

Ann Arbor campus

Faculty appointments with tenure:

Debra L. Barton, professor of nursing, effective Jan. 1.

Sharon H. Haar, professor of architecture, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, effective Jan. 1.

Named professorships

Debra L. Barton, Mary Lou Willard French Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, effective Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 2016.

Dr. Andrew P. Lieberman, Gerald D. Abrams Collegiate Professor, Medical School, effective Dec. 1, 2013-Aug. 31, 2018.

Stefan Nagel, Michael Stark Professor of Finance, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, effective Dec. 1, 2013-Nov. 30, 2018.

Lisa Nakamura, Gwendolyn Calvert Baker Collegiate Professor of American Culture and Screen Arts, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2014-Dec. 31, 2018.

Steven R. Ratner*, Bruno Simma Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, effective Feb. 1, 2014-Jan. 31, 2019.

Administrative appointments

Dr. Matthew L. Boulton, associate dean for global public health, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2014-Dec. 31, 2016.

Sara L. Forsdyke, chair, Department of Classical Studies, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2014-June 30, 2017.

Alec D. Gallimore, associate dean for academic affairs, College of Engineering, effective Jan. 1, 2014-Dec. 31, 2018.

June M. Howard, chair, Department of American Culture, LSA, effective Jan. 1, 2014-June 30, 2017.

Matthew L. Kaplan, interim director, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, effective Feb. 1.

Trivellore E. Raghunathan*, chair, Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, effective Jan. 1, 2014- Dec. 31, 2014.

Phillip E. Savage, interim chair, Department of Chemical Engineering, CoE, effective Jan. 1-July 31, 2014.

Steven P. Schwendeman*, chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, effective Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 2014.

Dearborn campus

Janine E. Janosky, professor of health and human services, effective Jan. 1, 2014, and dean, College of Education, Health and Human Services, effective Jan. 1, 2014-June 30, 2019.

Camron M. Amin, associate provost for graduate studies and online learning, Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 1, 2014-Dec. 31, 2014.

Susan A. Everett, chair, Department of Education, College of Education, Health and Human Services, effective Jan. 1, 2014-June 30, 2016.

Juliette K. Roddy, interim chair, Department of Health and Human Services, College of Education, Health and Human Services, effective Jan. 1, 2014-Dec. 31, 2015.

Flint campus

Vahid Lotfi, senior vice provost for academic affairs, UM-Flint, effective July 1, 2014-June 30, 2019.

Christine M. Waters*, associate provost and dean of undergraduate studies, effective July 1, 2014-June 30, 2019.

* Reappointments

Retirements

John R. Chamberlin, professor of public policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy; and professor of political science, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1970. Chamberlin’s research explored a wide range of topics including gender equity, legislative redistricting, nonprofit management and policy, representation, and voting methods. He sought to gain insights into how legislatures and polities arrange their choice mechanisms to be equitable, efficient and intelligible. He held key leadership positions including dean of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy (1997-99), and director of the Center for Ethics in Public Life.

Caroline B. Constant, Emil Lorch Collegiate Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning, and professor of architecture, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, effective Dec. 31. She joined the faculty in 2001. Her work challenged boundaries between architecture and landscape and between theory and practice. Constant’s record of creative achievement spans scholarly publications, book chapters and four books. She has been a fellow of the American Academy in Rome, a Fulbright Scholar, and a Helmut F. Stern Faculty Fellow. Her awards include the American Institute of Architects International Book Award and U-M’s Donna M. Salzer Award for Teaching Excellence.

Constance Ewing Cook, clinical professor of education, Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education in the School of Education; executive director, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching; and associate vice provost for academic affairs, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, effective Jan. 31, 2014. She served on the faculty of Albion College from 1979-86, and with the U.S. Department of Education’s Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education from 1987-90. At U-M, Cook was appointed executive director of CRLT in 1993, associate vice provost for academic affairs in 2006, and clinical professor of education in 2007. She worked to critically examine the elements of higher education pedagogy, advance faculty and graduate student instructor development, explore the implementation of novel instructional technologies, and foster excellence and innovation.

Rodney C. Ewing, Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor of Geological Sciences and professor of earth and environmental sciences, LSA; and professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences and professor of materials science and engineering, CoE, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1997. Ewing’s work has led to techniques that predict the long-term behavior of materials. He was granted a patent for the development of a highly durable material for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium. In 2012, he was appointed by President Obama to serve as chair of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, has served as chair of the Department of Geological Sciences, and has received awards including the Lomonosov Great Gold Medal of the Russian Academy.

Lauren D. Friesen, David M. French Professor and professor of theatre and dance, College of Arts and Sciences, UM-Flint, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1997. Friesen translated and edited plays, and his scholarly work explored ethics and spirituality in drama, religion and drama, and playwrights with spiritual or religious focus. His leadership as chair of the Department of Theatre and Dance was instrumental in the design and implementation of undergraduate and graduate degree programs in American theatre, art administration, dance, and theatre and technology. His awards include the Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festivals Gold Medallion for Excellence in Theatre.

Wendy E. Kerschbaum, associate professor of dental hygiene and director of the Dental Hygiene Program, School of Dentistry, effective Dec. 31. She joined the faculty in 1970 and served as director of the Dental Hygiene Program. A leading authority on dental hygiene education and health behavior research, Kerschbaum was instrumental in the development of U-M’s nationally recognized Dental Hygiene Program. She spearheaded the transition to the baccalaureate degree program, strengthened degree programs and implemented e-learning opportunities. Kerschbaum received the ADHA Educator of the Year Award in 2012. In her honor, the Student Chapter of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association established the annual Wendy Kerschbaum SADHA Emerging Leader Award.

Robert K. Lazarsfeld, Raymond L. Wilder Collegiate Professor of Mathematics and professor of mathematics, LSA, effective Dec. 31. Lazarsfeld joined the U-M faculty in 1997. A leading authority on algebraic geometry, he pioneered new directions of research and was instrumental in securing and managing a large Vertical Integration of Research and Education grant and other National Science Foundation grants. He served as editor and managing editor of the Journal of the American Mathematical Society and managing editor of the Michigan Mathematical Journal. His honors include the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Rudolf Mrazek, professor of history, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1990. Mrazek’s scholarly work focused on the history of modern Southeast Asia with special expertise in Indonesia history. His research critically examined and explored Indonesian-United States relations, major Indonesian nationalist leaders, Dutch colonialism through the prism of colonial technology, and colonial Jakarta. He was a prolific author and taught courses on modern Southeast Asian history, comparative history, history of colonial expansion, technology and nationalism, and oral history. His fellowships include a Ford Foundation Fellowship. Mrazek received the LSA Excellence in Research and Teaching Award.

Philip Myers, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and curator, Museum of Zoology, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1975. Myers is a leading scholar in mammalian systematics and biodiversity. His recent research explored the impact of climate change on the biogeography of northern hemisphere mammals. He successfully secured research grants and published numerous articles in leading peer-reviewed journals. He taught a wide range of courses and in 1995 launched the Animal Diversity Web, now a world-class educational resource for students from kindergarten to college. Myers has received numerous honors including LSA’s Excellence in Education Award and the Provost’s Teaching Innovation Prize.

Dr. Randolph M. Nesse, professor of psychiatry, Medical School; professor of psychology, LSA, and research professor, Institute for Social Research, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1977. Nesse is best known for his research in the field of evolutionary medicine, and as an author. He played an instrumental role in the establishment of the Evolution and Human Behavior Program and the Human Behavior and Evolution Society, serving as its president and chair of the publication committee. He received three Teacher of the Year Awards from the Department of Psychiatry and was elected a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

Eric S. Rabkin, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, professor of English language and literature, LSA; and professor of art and design, Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1970. An internationally known scholar and innovator, Rabkin explored several areas of study including fantasy and humanities computing, and recently studied and developed novel methods for digital learning and literacy. A prolific author, he also developed the world’s first writing intensive massive open online course for Coursera. Rabkin served as LSA associate dean for long-range planning and received honors including the Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award and the Golden Apple Award.

Richard A. Scott, professor of applied mechanics and engineering science, CoE, effective Dec. 31. Scott joined the faculty in 1967. Scott is a leading authority in the fields of dynamics of flexible mechanisms, dynamics of rotating composite shafts, optimization of damping treatments, and finite elements methods in solid mechanics and vibration. He authored numerous publications in leading engineering journals, and was actively involved in engineering academies and societies. Scott served as associate chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and received numerous honors including the Outstanding Teaching in Engineering Award, the Excellence in Service Award, and three Pi Tau Sigma Faculty of the Semester awards.

Barbara B. Smuts, professor of psychology, LSA, effective Dec. 31. She joined the faculty in 1983. An internationally recognized scholar, Smuts is best known for her pioneering research on friendships between adult female and male baboons. Her findings set the stage for subsequent work by others on animal social bonds. Smuts authored numerous journal articles, book chapters, and two books including “Primate Societies,” which remains a classic in the field. She served on a wide range of committees at U-M. Her honors include the Excellence in Education Award and the Excellence in Research Award. She was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Earl E. Werner, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the Edwin S. George Reserve, LSA, effective Dec. 31. He joined the faculty in 1986. Werner’s pioneering research focused on the nature of species interactions and the consequences on the structure of ecological communities. He authored more than 90 scientific papers, served as editor of the Ecology and Ecological Monographs, vice president of the Ecological Society of America, and on the scientific advisory board of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. Werner taught courses and seminars on a range of topics, oversaw the successful completion of 30 graduate degree dissertations, and received the George Mercer Award from the Ecological Society of America.

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