University of Michigan
News for Faculty and Staff

May 22, 2018

Cube access to be closed off during Michigan Union renovation

April 20, 2018

Cube access to be closed off during Michigan Union renovation

After a half-century of spinning, the University of Michigan's iconic Cube sculpture is taking a sabbatical.

Construction crews will need to close Regents' Plaza to help stage construction for the Michigan Union renovation project. Part of that work includes enclosing the Cube for protection.

Fencing will go up around the Michigan Union on April 30 as it closes temporarily for the renovation. The Cube will be enclosed on May 14, and will remain closed to the public until fall 2019.

The Union will undergo its most extensive renovation since it opened in 1919. The project will create social space on the main level by enclosing the courtyard, and expand and improve lounge and study spaces.

One of Mark Schlissel's first stops after being approved as U-M's 14th president in January 2014 was Regents' Plaza, where he give the Cube a ceremonial spin. (Photo by Scott C. Soderberg, Michigan Photography)

During the renovation, units and departments housed in the Union will be temporarily relocated to other spaces on campus. Food service will not be available in the Union during the renovation.

Commissioned by the U-M Class of 1965 and officially titled “Endover,” the revolving cube is one of three such sculptures designed by U-M alumnus and sculptor Bernard "Tony" Rosenthal. It measures 15 feet wide by 15 feet tall and was installed on Regents' Plaza in 1968.

Additional construction projects happening in the State Street area include:

William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center

The new $10 million facility will accommodate replacement spaces from the current Trotter Center and will contain a multipurpose room with the ability to host approximately 300 people.

LSA renovation and addition

The project will revitalize approximately 24,000 square feet on the first floor and construct an addition of approximately 21,000 square feet.

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